Monthly Archives: August 2013

CARTOON OF THE DAY: BASHAR ASSAD AND MILEY CYRUS

SYRIA CARTOON

Daryl Cagle is the publisher of Cagle.com and owner of Cagle Cartoons, Inc, which distributes editorial cartoons and columns to over 850 newspapers.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

HATEWATCH: WHITE SUPREMACIST CRAIG COBB DEFENDS PLANS FOR NORTH DAKOTA TOWN ON NEW HATE FORUM

White Supremacist Craig Cobb Defends Plans for North Dakota Town on New Hate Forum

Heidi Beirich on August 28, 2013,
Stanley Edward Diggs is the owner of the new racist web forum White Nations.

White supremacists are atwitter after the disclosure by Hatewatch last week that Craig Cobb and other extremists have been buying up properties in the tiny town of Leith, N.D., with the intention of creating an all-white enclave.

Lengthy threads have popped up on the hate forums Stormfront and Vanguard News Network (VNN), with many white supremacists endorsing the idea of a white living space. But most of the action is taking place in a relatively new Internet forum, White Nations, which started this past May after its owner, “Fred O’Malley,” was kicked off VNN.

Craig Cobb wants to build a park to honor William Pierce, the neo-Nazi founder of the National Alliance, in the vacant lot on the left in Leith, N.D.

It is clear from Cobb’s posts on White Nations that he hasn’t given up on his dream of a white homeland, even given the bad press and uproar in Leith that has come in the wake of Hatewatch’s investigation. To show that he is staying put in Leith, Cobb has posted pictures of his plans for the town. As an example, he put up one photo showing the site where he intends to create “Dr. William L. Pierce Pvt. Park of Leith,” in honor of the longtime leader of the neo-Nazi National Alliance.

Cobb has received nothing but positive support on White Nations. That is especially true about its founder “Fred O’Malley,” with whom he is clearly close, based on an interview with Cobb by the SPLC. In the real world, O’Malley is actually Stanley Edward Diggs of Houma, La., or “Stan” as Cobb called him during the interview. For some time, Diggs had been posting on VNN on various topics, including why women need to “STAY AWAY FROM NIGGERS” and how “Guns level the field with government goons.” [In the past, Diggs has targeted the SPLC, posting a picture at one point of a staffer’s wife]. His posts on his new site are in the same racist vein.

Diggs owns a remodeling and roofing company, A-1-A Construction, in Houma (there is a Ripoff Report on the company here). He was booted from VNN earlier this year along with other prominent white supremacists, including Cobb, after a series of sophomoric exchanges. In the interview with the SPLC, Cobb refused to explain why he and Diggs were kicked off VNN. Repeated calls to Diggs’ phone were not returned.

White Nations is also moderated by Cynthia W. Slay, who posts there as “WitchesChild.” On Stormfront and VNN, Slay goes as “WolfsCompass” and “BrennaWolf.” She did not return phone calls for comment.

Cobb’s White Nations posts have been defiant, and he continues his aggressive promotion of North Dakota as a homeland for white supremacists. One post made the point that fellow white supremacist and Leith property owner April Gaede and her “mate” Mark Harrington have earned as much as $1,500 a week for doing unskilled labor that is in high demand due to the state’s oil and gas boom. Cobb is also publicizing how close one of the boomtowns, Dickinson, is to Leith, and encouraging white supremacists to call realtors and say this: “I am interested in buying some property in the Grant County, Leith, Carson, Elgin, New Leipzig, Mott, Lark and Flasher areas. I heard about Craig Cobb’s project in Leith. The Third Reich, NS, and Hitler are mentioned in our holy religious texts, but I am not a Neo Nazi, whatever that is. Can you send me your MLS list or advise me? Would that be OK?”

In another post, Cobb confirmed that he was fired by Border States Paving of Fargo and he has written about possibly filing a complaint with the EEOC over his dismissal. He has asked his fellow white supremacists to write to the company to complain. Many of them have, for which Cobb has effusively thanked them. Cobb is also looking into whether he has somehow been the victim of housing discrimination.

SOURCE

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE VICTIMS OF ENFORCED DISAPPEARANCES: AUGUST 30, 2013

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE VICTIMS OF ENFORCED DISAPPEARANCES

Quick Facts

The International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances is annually observed on August 30.

Name

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances 2013

Friday, August 30, 2013

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances 2014

Saturday, August 30, 2014

The United Nations (UN) observes the International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances on August 30 each year.

Mothers at Bolivar Square in Bogota, Colombia, holding photos of their children, who are victims of enforced disappearance.©iStockphoto.com/jcarillet

What do people do?

On August 30 each year, organizations such as the UN and Amnesty International play an active role in raising awareness that enforced disappearance is a crime and should not be used as a tool to deal with situations of conflict. Many activists openly share personal stories, via the media or public event, about victims of enforced disappearances and the impact that these disappearances have on their families and communities.

Public life

The International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances is a UN observance and not a public holiday.

Background

Enforced disappearance is used as a strategy to spread terror within the society. It occurs when people are arrested, detained or abducted against their will and when governments refuse to disclose the whereabouts of these people. Enforced disappearance is a global problem and is not restricted to a specific region of the world.

In December 2010, the UN officially declared that it would annually observe the International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances on August 30 each year, starting from 2011.

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Tue Aug 30 2011 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Thu Aug 30 2012 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Fri Aug 30 2013 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Sat Aug 30 2014 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Sun Aug 30 2015 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Tue Aug 30 2016 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Wed Aug 30 2017 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Thu Aug 30 2018 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Fri Aug 30 2019 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance
Sun Aug 30 2020 International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances United Nations observance

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

AUGUST 28, 2013: THE 1963 MARCH ON WASHINGTON: A DREAM DEFRERRED

Much ado has been made in the last  few weeks on the upcoming 50TH Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. Many people across the nation are singing praises of”Hallelujah, all is well within these United States!”

“We have a Black president in the White House, isn’t that proof enough that we live in a post-racial nation?”

“We’ve come a long way and racism (as well as sexism–that old bugaboo that so many treat as if it does not exist) is a thing of the past!”

But———–has this nation really come to terms with its sordid and sadistic past? Has America really become the Land of the Free, and the Home of the Brave?

Are we still faced with the vilification of blackness; has it really gone Poof! away, just like that? I do not see where it has.

I see much of the anger, rage, and pissed off response of so many people when race is brought up, that it no longer is a surprise to me after all these years, when the angered response comes from the fact that if race is not discussed, it will just go away:

amptoons the ones i like cartoonCartoon courtesy of Amptoons

Facts are, it will not go away, until it is honestly dealt with in how it affects so many lives via education, economics/labor, law, health, sex, politics, religion, entertainment, and war.

Has the possesiveness of whiteness gone the way of the Allosaurus? Has America become a nation where racial profiling is a thing of the past; where shopping while black, driving while black, living while black is no longer the norm:

norman rockwell cop painting

Has America finally become a nation where the worship of whiteness no longer occurs? Where the possessivness of whiteness no longer validates one citizen’s humanity over another one, because of the color of their skin:

Norman%20Rockwell%20ThanksgivingYes, America no longer publicly burns to death her Black citizens, while city, county, state and federal government not only looked the other way, but condoned such barbarism, de jure and de facto:

Lynching_of_Laura_Nelson,_May_1911Sure, lynching spectacles no longer occur the way they did in this nation’s history, but, still in the present, the denigration of Black citizens; the character assassinations of Black citizens; the on a daily, weekly, monthly and yearly basis of death from a thousand paper cuts still happens in the lives of so many Black Americans.

Can America truly celebrate itself as a nation which has come to terms with its violent mistreatment of her Black citizens? Can America say that “We are free at last, free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”?

Can America truly say that her Black citizens can live in peace and not be treated as pariahs? As non-citizens? But instead as full citizens of this country, no longer judged on the color of their skin, but on the content of their character:

whites only in our communityDr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke of the Beloved Community; a nation where all had their humanity given respect and equal protection under the law:

Our goal is to create a beloved community and this will require a qualitative change in our souls as well as a quantitative change in our lives. ~ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Love is creative and redemptive. Love builds up and unites; hate tears down and
destroys. The aftermath of the ‘fight with fire’ method which you suggest is
bitterness and chaos, the aftermath of the love method is reconciliation and
creation of the beloved community. Physical force can repress, restrain, coerce,
destroy, but it cannot create and organize anything permanent; only love can do
that. Yes, love—which means understanding, creative, redemptive goodwill, even
for one’s enemies—is the solution to the race problem.
—Martin Luther King, Jr., 1957


But the end is reconciliation; the end is redemption; the end is the creation of
the beloved community. It is this type of spirit and this type of love that can
transform opposers into friends. The type of love that I stress here is not
eros, a sort of esthetic or romantic love; not philia, a sort of reciprocal love
between personal friends; but it is agape which is understanding goodwill for
all men. It is an overflowing love which seeks nothing in return. It is the love
of God working in the lives of men. This is the love that may well be the
salvation of our civilization.
from “The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation’s Chief Moral Dilemma,” 1957

America still has not arrived at that beloved community.

She still has not realized that where one group suffers, all others in turn will suffer as well.

When it comes to health, according to the National Research Council report, it was found that American citizens are sicker and with shorter life spans than citizens in 16 other wealthy nations. Spending more on the military complex instead of social services that help citizens is a sign of callous disregard for the citizens of this nation. America ranks No. 1 for diabetes in adults over age 20, and No. 2 for deaths from coronary artery disease and lung disease. The Japanese smoke more than Americans, but outlive us; the French and Germans drink more than us, but outlive us. Much is spent on healthcare, but, it is not the amount that is spent, but how it is spent. Caring for the overall health of all Americans pays off in the long run. It is a simple matter of pay now, or have a hell of a bill to pay later in the future.

You cannot call yourself the greatest nation in the world when you still have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the light from out of the darkness.

Is America a true and just nation towards all her people, in the year 2013?

Only you, dear readers, can decide that for yourselves.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

INTERNATIONAL DAY AGAINST NUCLEAR TESTS: AUGUST 29, 2013

INTERNATIONAL DAY AGAINST NUCLEAR TESTS

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day against Nuclear Tests is annually observed on August 29. The day raises awareness of the dangers of nuclear weapons and a closer approach to eliminating the use of those weapons.

Name

International Day against Nuclear Tests

Alternative name

Día Internacional contra las Pruebas Nucleares

International Day against Nuclear Tests 2013

Thursday, August 29, 2013

International Day against Nuclear Tests 2014

Friday, August 29, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day against Nuclear Tests brings public awareness and education about the effects of global nuclear weapon tests. The day aims to end nuclear testing and to promote peace and security.

International Day against Nuclear TestsInternational Day Against Nuclear Tests aims to educate and bring awareness about the effects of nuclear testing.©iStockphoto.com/endopack

What do People Do?

The International Day against Nuclear Tests aims to raise people’s awareness on the need to prevent nuclear catastrophes to avert devastating effects on humankind, the environment and the planet. Many people use the day as an opportunity to share their perspective on the issue of nuclear weapons and testing.  Different organizations may host educational and public activities to bring awareness of the use of nuclear weapons and the dangers involved with nuclear weapons testing and usage.

Public Life

The International Day against Nuclear Tests is a global observance but it is not a public holiday.

Background

The history of nuclear testing began on July 16, 1945, when an atomic bomb was used at a desert test site in Alamogordo, New Mexico, in the United States. More than 2000 nuclear tests were carried out worldwide between 1945 and 1996. Nuclear weapons tests are generally broken into different categories reflecting the test’s medium or location:

  • Atmospheric tests.
  • Underwater tests.
  • Underground tests.

Over the years, there have been calls to ban nuclear test to ensure the protection of people’s lives and the environment around them. The UN approved a draft resolution in late 2009 for an international day against nuclear tests to raise public awareness about the threats and dangers of nuclear weapons.  It was also hoped that UN’s member states would move towards the idea of nuclear disarmament.

The International Day against Nuclear Tests was declared to be annually held on August 29, which marks the closing of one of the world’s largest nuclear test sites (in Kazakhstan) in 1991. The day is devoted to enhancing public awareness and education about the effects of nuclear weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions. It also promotes the need for a nuclear weapon-free world. The day’s first official observance was marked for August 29, 2010.

International Day against Nuclear Tests Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Sun Aug 29 2010 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Mon Aug 29 2011 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Wed Aug 29 2012 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Thu Aug 29 2013 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Fri Aug 29 2014 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Sat Aug 29 2015 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Mon Aug 29 2016 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Tue Aug 29 2017 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Wed Aug 29 2018 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Thu Aug 29 2019 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance
Sat Aug 29 2020 International Day against Nuclear Tests United Nations observance

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE REMEMBRANCE OF THE SLAVE TRADE AND ITS ABOLITION: AUGUST 23, 2013

INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE REMEMBRANCE OF THE SLAVE TRADE AND ITS ABOLITION

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is held on August 23 each year to remind people of the tragedy of the transatlantic slave trade.

Local names

Name Language
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition English
Día Internacional del Recuerdo de la Trata de Esclavos y de su Abolición Spanish

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 2013

Friday, August 23, 2013

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 2014

Saturday, August 23, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is annually observed on August 23 to remind people of the tragedy of the transatlantic slave trade. It gives people a chance to think about the historic causes, the methods and the consequences of slave trade.

UN International Day for the remembrance of the Slave Trade and its AbolitionThe UN’s International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition reminds people of the tragedy of slave trade.©iStockphoto.com/Erik Kolstad

What do people do?

Each year the UN invites people all over the world, including educators, students and artists, to organize events that center on the theme of this day. Theatre companies, cultural organizations, musicians and artists take part on this day by expressing their resistance against slavery through performances that involve music, dance and drama.

Educators promote the day by informing people about the historical events associated with slave trade, the consequences of slave trade, and to promote tolerance and human rights. Many organizations, including youth associations, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations, actively take part in the event to educate society about the negative consequences of slave trade.

Public life

The UN’s International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is a United Nations observance worldwide but it is not a public holiday.

Background

In late August, 1791, an uprising began in Santo Domingo (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic) that would have a major effect on abolishing the transatlantic slave trade. The slave rebellion in the area weakened the Caribbean colonial system, sparking an uprising that led to abolishing slavery and giving the island its independence. It marked the beginning of the destruction of the slavery system, the slave trade and colonialism.

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition was first celebrated in many countries, in particular in Haiti, on August 23, 1998, and in Senegal on August 23, 1999. Each year the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) reminds the international community about the importance of commemorating this day. This date also pays tribute to those who worked hard to abolish slave trade and slavery throughout the world. This commitment and the actions used to fight against the system of slavery had an impact on the human rights movement.

Symbols

UNESCO’s logo features a drawing of a temple with the “UNESCO” acronym under the roof of the temple and on top of the temple’s foundation. Underneath the temple are the words “United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization”. This logo is often used in promotional material for the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Sun Aug 23 1998 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Mon Aug 23 1999 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Wed Aug 23 2000 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Thu Aug 23 2001 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Fri Aug 23 2002 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Sat Aug 23 2003 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Mon Aug 23 2004 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Tue Aug 23 2005 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Wed Aug 23 2006 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Thu Aug 23 2007 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Sat Aug 23 2008 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Sun Aug 23 2009 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Mon Aug 23 2010 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Tue Aug 23 2011 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Thu Aug 23 2012 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Fri Aug 23 2013 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Sat Aug 23 2014 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Sun Aug 23 2015 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Tue Aug 23 2016 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Wed Aug 23 2017 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Thu Aug 23 2018 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Fri Aug 23 2019 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance
Sun Aug 23 2020 International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nations observance

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

WORLD HUMANITARIAN DAY: AUGUST 19, 2013

WORLD HUMANITARIAN DAY

Quick Facts

The United Nations’(UN) World Humanitarian Day focuses on increasing public awareness about humanitarian service worldwide and is annually observed on August 19.

Name

World Humanitarian Day

Alternative name

Día Mundial Humanitario

World Humanitarian Day 2013

Monday, August 19, 2013

World Humanitarian Day 2014

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) World Humanitarian Day is held on August 19 each year. The day honors all humanitarians who have worked in the promotion of the humanitarian cause, and those who have lost their lives in the cause of duty.

The day aims to increase public awareness about humanitarian assistance activities worldwide and the importance of international cooperation.

What Do People Do?

World Humanitarian Day is a day dedicated to humanitarians worldwide, as well as to increase public understanding of humanitarian assistance activities. The day aims to honor humanitarian workers who have lost their lives or injured themselves in the course of their work, and to acknowledge the ongoing work of humanitarian staff around the world.

Many communities and organizations try to increase the importance of humanitarians by distributing publicity and information material. Additionally, some try to speak to the press to help spread these key messages of World Humanitarian Day, while other groups organize public events worldwide that feature humanitarian work.

For the year 2010 and beyond, it is anticipated that World Humanitarian Day will focus on particular humanitarian themes to help increase public awareness.

Public Life

World Humanitarian Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

Humanitarians provide life-saving assistance to millions of people worldwide. They place their own lives at risk to help others in conflict zones and areas of natural hazards. More than 700 humanitarian workers have died or experienced the most dangerous situations while trying to help those in need. Humanitarians provide support for different world challenges such as hunger, gender-based violence, refugees and displaced people, help for children, as well as clean water and access to sanitation.

World Humanitarian Day was established by the General Assembly of the UN in December 2008 and was first observed in August 2009. The date of August 19 is the anniversary date of the 2003 Canal Hotel bombing in Baghdad where twenty-two people lost their lives including, the UN’s High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General to Iraq, Sergio Vieira de Mello.

The total number of people affected by natural disasters has risen over the past decade, and about 211 million people are directly affected each year. Women and children are especially affected because of their ongoing struggles with poverty, insecurity, hunger, poor health and environmental decline. There are new and difficult challenges that arise each year that will require more flexible funding and adaptable humanitarian work. The increasing economic crisis and global challenges such as poverty, global health problems, increase prices and the rising number of people on the move, increases the need for humanitarians each year.

Symbols

World Humanitarian Day does not have a logo because the day does not “belong” to the UN or any other agency or organization.  The media documents support the day by capturing images that show people helping others that are in need of assistance.

World Humanitarian Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Aug 19 2010 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Fri Aug 19 2011 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Sun Aug 19 2012 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Mon Aug 19 2013 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Tue Aug 19 2014 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Wed Aug 19 2015 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Fri Aug 19 2016 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Sat Aug 19 2017 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Sun Aug 19 2018 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Mon Aug 19 2019 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance
Wed Aug 19 2020 World Humanitarian Day United Nations observance

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized