HATEWATCH: COMPANY SELLS GUN OIL LACED WITH PIG FAT TO DENY MUSLIMS PARADISE

Company Sells Gun Oil Laced with Pig Fat to Deny Muslims Paradise

by Ryan Lenz on May 26, 2011

Silver Bullet gun oil bottles

UPDATE: The manufacturer of Silver Bullet Gun Oil, who goes by the name Midnite Rider, contacted Hatewatch late last night in response to an interview request. In the brief E-mail exchange that followed, he continued his attack on Islam and refused to reveal his identity. “I don’t have 24 hour full security detail like our president,” he wrote. In response to concerns the story raised, his only reply was that he hoped his gun oil would offend Muslims. “It is designed as an affront to an entire belief structure,” he wrote. “You have seen what the people this oil is designed for did to folks who draw simple cartoons or burn certain pieces of paper, right? Benefiting mankind does not exempt one from the wrath of the insane.”

A mysterious company called Silver Bullet Gun Oil has begun selling a line of products for automatic weapons that allegedly contains 13% liquefied pig fat for the expressed purpose of killing Muslims and denying them “a place in paradise,” Hatewatch has learned.

“No longer is paradise guaranteed to the so-called ‘Martyrs’ who die for Allah,” one YouTube video advertisement proclaims in text. “You are fools, on a fool’s mission. Lied to and led by False Prophets and Cowards. … You cannot win, and Will be consigned to Allah’s Hell for eternity if you die from a weapon using Silver Bullet Gun Oil!”

Consumption of pork is forbidden in Islam. So the belief behind the oil is that a person killed with a bullet that travels down the barrel of a gun greased in pig fat would be desecrated. Even if the gun oil is never used, the manufacturer boasts, its mere existence will terrorize Muslims and result in an effective “counter-Islamic terrorist force multiplier.”

It could also provoke violent backlashes from Muslims who feel their faith is being attacked. In early April, at least 20 people were killed in riots in Afghanistan provoked by Terry Jones, a Florida pastor who burned a Koran.

The oil’s manufacturer goes by the nom de guerre, “Midnite Rider – Servant of Yahweh,” an Old Testament name for God, but his real identity is unknown. Despite that anonymity, several things are clear: the oil is being marketed to soldiers and Marines deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, and it is designed to amplify the kind of anti-Muslim sentiment spread by such groups as Brigitte Gabrielle’s ACT! for America, Pamela Geller’s Stop the Islamization of America, and others.

Hatewatch recently purchased several bottles of the gun oil to determine if the company was real. The gun oil arrived in a box postmarked from Courtland, Va., a town of about 1,300 people 50 miles southwest of Norfolk. Included with the gun oil were decals and playing cards – the ace of spades printed with the words “One Shot, One Soul” to put on the bodies of dead Muslims. Also included in the package was a biography of a World War I American general who supposedly executed 49 Muslims in the Philippines with bullets soaked in pig’s blood.

Silver Bullet gun oil stickers

Midnite Rider makes the dubious claim that police tactical teams and “many members” of all U.S. military branches use the oil. It could not be determined if there is any truth to this claim. He continues: “Many, many of allah’s [sic] misfits, murderers and morons have been turned away from his gates of ‘Paradise’ due to their stench of swine,” he brags. Hatewatch today sent a message to the manufacturer through its website seeking comment, but did not immediately receive a response.

Several testimonials on the site are attributed to military members offering reviews of the product. One, written by a man identified as “Matt M,” begins, “Midnite Rider, you are a [sic] honest to goodness 100% USDA, grade AAA shining Fucking GENIUS. … This is the most brilliant mind fucking warfare idea I’ve ever seen.” Another testimonial is attributed to a supposedly moderate Muslim soldier. “Your product is great,” he writes. “Old school propaganda type shit with teeth.”

It is also impossible to determine if the testimonials are real, or if the company has made any sales directly to military personnel, but several online forums for firearms enthusiasts touted the oil. Boyd Collins, a civilian spokesman for the U.S. Army Materiel Command, which oversees the Army’s equipment, said he had never heard of the gun oil, though he conceded that a soldier or Marine could theoretically purchase the oil on his or her own and use it on the battlefield.

Since the war in Afghanistan began in October 2001, a number of companies have sold products to soldiers that have painted the U.S. military as party to nothing less than a holy war. Last year, the U.S. military was criticized after purchasing riflescopes from Trijicon engraved with Bible passages. Also last year, a military veteran who worked at Camp Lejeune, N.C., was turned away from post because his car was emblazoned with anti-Islamic decals, including a sticker that said “ISLAM = TERRORISM.”

Advertisements for the oil appear prominently on the webpage of the Arizona Citizens Militia (ACM), a border militia the Southern Poverty Law Center lists as an antigovernment “Patriot” group. ACM said the advertisements were placed there arbitrarily, but declined to comment further.

Midnite Rider offers a glimpse for his rationale behind creating the oil – and brags about covertly selling thousands of bottles since 2005 – in an essay titled “Political Correctness, Refuge of the Weak.” “If you do not put forth a strong front, instilling fear of retribution for acts of terror, you will be perceived as having weakness which can and will be exploited.”

SOURCE

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I am not going to go into haram and halal concerning the involuntary consumption of pork products, in this case, pig lard, that Muslims may come into contact with. This seller of this product shows his woeful ignorance of Islam. Muslims who through no knowledge of their own, ingest or have injected into their bodies this pig lard if they are shot by a bullet that has traces of pig lard will not automatically be sent straight to Jahannam. Only God (Jehovah/Yahweh/Allah) knows who among us will go to Heaven/Jannah or Hell, and being on the receiving end of a pig lard laced bullet will not send a Muslim to Jahannam.

What I have is one question:

What size straight jacket does this loony wear?

It is not enough that he has no intelligent knowledge of the Quran on the consumption of pig or any animal considered unclean to eat. If a Muslim eats pig because she is starving, she will be forgiven for that, for it is better to eat and live and devoutly do right by all people per Allah, than to starve to death because pork is the only food available.

As for the U.S.military use of this oil, I would hope that no U.S. soldier knowingly uses this crap. America has created enough enemies for herself through the decades, and the use of this ….pig slop, is just another nail in the coffin for bad relations for America. Bad, dangerous actions that will cause more U.S. soldier’s deaths, since the Islamic insurgents do know how to read and do have access to the Internet.

As for the seller of this so-called “gun oil”, a straight jacket is not enough for him.

He should be charged with attempted murder of U.S. soldiers and U.S. civilians. His lack of knowledge and understanding of Islamic laws on pork, and his putting in danger U.S. soldiers says a lot about his stupid, craven, and addled mentality.

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A VISIT FROM THE KU KLUX, BY FRANK BELLEW

Visit of the Ku-Klux

Visit of the Ku Klux, by Frank Bellew. First appeared on February 24, 1872 in Harper’s Weekley. Wood engraving.

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INTERNATIONAL DAY OF INNOCENT CHILDREN VICTIMS OF AGGRESSION: JUNE 4, 2011

 

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF INNOCENT CHILDREN VICTIMS OF AGGRESSION

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression is observed on June 4 each year.

Local names

Name
Language
International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression English
Día internacional de los Niños Víctimas Inocentes de Agresión Spanish

International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 2011

Saturday, June 4, 2011

International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 2012

Monday, June 4, 2012
List of dates for other years

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression is observed on June 4 each year. The purpose of the day is to acknowledge the pain suffered by children throughout the world who are the victims of physical, mental and emotional abuse. This day affirms the UN’s commitment to protect the rights of children.
UN International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Agression
This photo is used for illustrative purposes only. It does not imply the attitudes, behaviour or actions of the model in this photo. ©iStockphoto.com/Sean_Warren

What do people do?

The International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression celebrates the millions of individuals and organizations working to protect and preserve the rights of children. For example, the Global Movement for Children, with leadership from Nelson Mandela and Graca Machel, is an inspiring force for change that involves ordinary people and families worldwide. The ”Say Yes for Children” campaign, endorsed by more than 94 million people, calls for 10 positive actions to be taken to improve the lives of children.

This day is a time for individuals and organizations all over the world to become aware of the impact of monstrosity of abuse, in all its forms, against children. It is also a time when organizations and individuals learn from or take part in awareness campaigns centered on protecting children’s rights.

Public life

The UN International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

On 19 August 1982, at its emergency special session on the question of Palestine, the General Assembly, appalled at the great number of innocent Palestinian and Lebanese children victims of Israel’s acts of aggression, decided to commemorate June 4 of each year as the International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression. According to the United Nations in China, the statistics of child abuse include:

  • More than two million children killed in conflict in the last two decades.
  • About 10 million child refugees cared for by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR).
  • In the Latin America and in the Caribbean region about 80 thousand children die annually from violence that breaks out within the family.

Child abuse is now in the spotlight of global attention and the UN is working hard to help protect children around the world. One key factor is the process of international negotiation and action centered around the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression Observances

Weekday
Date
Year
Name
Holiday type
Where it is observed
Sat Jun 4 1983 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Mon Jun 4 1984 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Tue Jun 4 1985 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Wed Jun 4 1986 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Thu Jun 4 1987 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sat Jun 4 1988 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sun Jun 4 1989 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Mon Jun 4 1990 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Tue Jun 4 1991 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Thu Jun 4 1992 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Fri Jun 4 1993 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sat Jun 4 1994 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sun Jun 4 1995 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Tue Jun 4 1996 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Wed Jun 4 1997 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Thu Jun 4 1998 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Fri Jun 4 1999 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sun Jun 4 2000 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Mon Jun 4 2001 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Tue Jun 4 2002 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Wed Jun 4 2003 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Fri Jun 4 2004 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sat Jun 4 2005 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sun Jun 4 2006 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Mon Jun 4 2007 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Wed Jun 4 2008 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Thu Jun 4 2009 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Fri Jun 4 2010 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Sat Jun 4 2011 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Mon Jun 4 2012 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Tue Jun 4 2013 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Wed Jun 4 2014 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day  
Thu Jun 4 2015 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nation day

SOURCE

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BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA: PVT. SARAH LOUISE KEYS, A PIONEER IN LEGAL RESISTANCE

Much has been stated about the contributions that Black American men have made to this nation. Often forgotten, ignored, and disregarded, are the numerous contributions and achievements that so many Black American women have done in various fields:  the labor movement; health care; business; entertainment; legal resistance; the military.

Starting this week, but recurring on Mondays, I will post on the laudable contributions that Black women have made to this country. This is something I have been meaning to do ever since I started my blog, but, I have often put up a post here, a post there, on the achievements of Black American women. I have decided that it is now or never. The posts will be highlights of a particular field that Black women made inroads into, or a stand-alone post on a Black woman who challenged racism, sexism, and many other isms, in her endeavors.

Today’s post features Pvt. Sarah Louise Keys.

Before Mrs. Rosa Parks made her stand by sitting down and defying racial segregation on a Montgomery, Alabama city bus, Pvt. Keys took a stand against segregation when she was ordered to render her seat to a White passenger, while she traveled, in full uniform, on a bus bound for her home.

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NOT AT THE BACK OF THE BUS

Private Sarah Louise Keys was in the first generation of members of the Women’s Army Corps to serve in an officially integrated military. In August 1962 she was an information clerk and receptionist at the Army hospital at Fort Dix, New Jersey, when she received a furlough to go home to North Carolina. She was wearing her uniform when she stepped on the bus and took her seat near the front of the bus. At Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, a new driver came onto the bus to replace the one who had been driving since New Jersey. He asked Pvt. Keys to change seats with a White Marine who was sitting near the back of the bus.

Pvt. Keys refused.

That was the beginning of one of the most important cases in civil rights history. The bus driver had all of his passengers move to a second bus, provided by the bus company, refusing to allow Pvt. Keys to board. She was forcibly removed to the police station, where she was charged with disorderly conduct and jailed overnight, with no phone call allowed. She was released the following afternoon after paying a twenty-five dollar fine.

Pvt. Sarah Keys’ family was outraged and persuaded her to go to court, but she lost. Then a friend suggested that the Keys family hire Dovey Johnson, another Black military woman. After fighting to be admitted to the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC), Ms. Johnson had become one of thirty-seven Black women in the first class of commissioned officers in the WAAC in 1942. After WWII she attended Howard University Law School and practiced in Washington, DC. Pvt. Keys hired Ms. Johnson to represent her, and the two military women, working together,began to fight for equality and dignity on a legal battlefield.

The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia refused to hear the suit, stating that it was out of its jurisdiction. Pvt. Keys and Ms. Johnson, along with her law partner Julius Robertson, then went to the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) and filed a suit alleging unjust discrimination, undue and unreasonable prejudice, false arrest, and imprisonment on the basis of race and color. At first, the ICC refused to review the case, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board ruling. The reviewing commissioner claimed that precedent did not apply in the matter of a private business. But Pvt. Keys’ lawyers kept fighting until they were able to get a review by the full commission.

The decision of that commission, handed down in November of 1955, reversed the “separate but equal” policy established in 1989. Black passengers who paid the same amount for their fares must be given the same service.

Excerpted from “Black Women in America, Vol. 2″, Second Edition, by Darlene Clark Hine, et. al., Oxford University Press, 2005, pg. 266.

For more information, see Judith Bellafaire, “Challenging the System: Two Army Women Fight for Equality.” Women in Military Service For America Memorial Foundation, Inc.  http://womensmemorial.org/Education/BHMSys.html

See also, Sarah Keys vs. Carolina Coach Company.

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MEMORIAL DAY: BLACK AMERICA’S CONTRIBUTION

Today was Memorial Day. After all of the picnics, parades, barbeques, and family get-togethers, how many people know the meaning behind why Memorial Day is celebrated?

Most of all, how many know of the first Memorial Day that was celebrated May 1, 1865, in the port city of Charleston, South Carolina, by recently freed Black Americans who honored the Union Civil War dead of the conflict? During the final year of the war, the Confederates had converted the city’s Washington Race Course and Jockey Club into an outdoor prison. Union captives were imprisoned under inhumane conditions in the interior of the track; at least 257 died of disease and were hastily buried in a mass grave behind the grandstand.

Ex-enslave black workmen went to the site, after the Confederate evacuation of Charleston and reburied the Union dead properly, and built a high fence around the cemetery. They whitewashed the fence and built an archway over an entrance on which they inscribed the words, “Martyrs of the Race Course”, thus creating the first day of memorializing the fallen dead.

How many know of the erasing of memory, and history, of these compassionate and patriotic ex-enslaves who showed reverence for the dead and interred them with dignity and kindness?

How many know of the 700 Black women who carried wreaths,  flowers and crosses to decorate the graves of the Union soldiers? How many know of the 3,000 Black children who sung “John Brown’s Body” and “The Star-Spangled Banner”  in praise for the Union dead who not only fought to keep the union intact, but also fought to free the enslaves? How many know of the Black ministers who recited from the Bible and said prayers over the remains of the soldiers?

Not many, I would say.

**************************************************************************

Op-Ed Contributor

Forgetting Why We Remember

By DAVID W. BLIGHT

Published: May 29, 2011
 

MOST Americans know that Memorial Day is about honoring the nation’s war dead. It is also a holiday devoted to department store sales, half-marathons, picnics, baseball and auto racing. But where did it begin, who created it, and why?

At the end of the Civil War, Americans faced a formidable challenge: how to memorialize 625,000 dead soldiers, Northern and Southern. As Walt Whitman mused, it was “the dead, the dead, the dead — our dead — or South or North, ours all” that preoccupied the country. After all, if the same number of Americans per capita had died in Vietnam as died in the Civil War, four million names would be on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, instead of 58,000.

Officially, in the North, Memorial Day emerged in 1868 when the Grand Army of the Republic, the Union veterans’ organization, called on communities to conduct grave-decorating ceremonies. On May 30, funereal events attracted thousands of people at hundreds of cemeteries in countless towns, cities and mere crossroads. By the 1870s, one could not live in an American town, North or South, and be unaware of the spring ritual.

But the practice of decorating graves — which gave rise to an alternative name, Decoration Day — didn’t start with the 1868 events, nor was it an exclusively Northern practice. In 1866 the Ladies’ Memorial Association of Columbus, Ga., chose April 26, the anniversary of Gen. Joseph Johnston’s final surrender to Gen. William T. Sherman, to commemorate fallen Confederate soldiers. Later, both May 10, the anniversary of Gen. Stonewall Jackson’s death, and June 3, the birthday of Jefferson Davis, were designated Confederate Memorial Day in different states.

Memorial Days were initially occasions of sacred bereavement, and from the war’s end to the early 20th century they helped forge national reconciliation around soldierly sacrifice, regardless of cause. In North and South, orators and participants frequently called Memorial Day an “American All Saints Day,” likening it to the European Catholic tradition of whole towns marching to churchyards to honor dead loved ones.

But the ritual quickly became the tool of partisan memory as well, at least through the violent Reconstruction years. In the South, Memorial Day was a means of confronting the Confederacy’s defeat but without repudiating its cause. Some Southern orators stressed Christian notions of noble sacrifice. Others, however, used the ritual for Confederate vindication and renewed assertions of white supremacy. Blacks had a place in this Confederate narrative, but only as time-warped loyal slaves who were supposed to remain frozen in the past.

The Lost Cause tradition thrived in Confederate Memorial Day rhetoric; the Southern dead were honored as the true “patriots,” defenders of their homeland, sovereign rights, a natural racial order and a “cause” that had been overwhelmed by “numbers and resources” but never defeated on battlefields.

Yankee Memorial Day orations often righteously claimed the high ground of blood sacrifice to save the Union and destroy slavery. It was not uncommon for a speaker to honor the fallen of both sides, but still lay the war guilt on the “rebel dead.” Many a lonely widow or mother at these observances painfully endured expressions of joyous death on the altars of national survival.

Some events even stressed the Union dead as the source of a new egalitarian America, and a civic rather than a racial or ethnic definition of citizenship. In Wilmington, Del., in 1869, Memorial Day included a procession of Methodists, Baptists, Unitarians and Catholics; white Grand Army of the Republic posts in parade with a black post; and the “Mount Vernon Cornet Band (colored)” keeping step with the “Irish Nationalists with the harp and the sunburst flag of Erin.”

But for the earliest and most remarkable Memorial Day, we must return to where the war began. By the spring of 1865, after a long siege and prolonged bombardment, the beautiful port city of Charleston, S.C., lay in ruin and occupied by Union troops. Among the first soldiers to enter and march up Meeting Street singing liberation songs was the 21st United States Colored Infantry; their commander accepted the city’s official surrender.

Whites had largely abandoned the city, but thousands of blacks, mostly former slaves, had remained, and they conducted a series of commemorations to declare their sense of the meaning of the war.

Related

The largest of these events, forgotten until I had some extraordinary luck in an archive at Harvard, took place on May 1, 1865. During the final year of the war, the Confederates had converted the city’s Washington Race Course and Jockey Club into an outdoor prison. Union captives were kept in horrible conditions in the interior of the track; at least 257 died of disease and were hastily buried in a mass grave behind the grandstand.

After the Confederate evacuation of Charleston black workmen went to the site, reburied the Union dead properly, and built a high fence around the cemetery. They whitewashed the fence and built an archway over an entrance on which they inscribed the words, “Martyrs of the Race Course.”

The symbolic power of this Low Country planter aristocracy’s bastion was not lost on the freedpeople, who then, in cooperation with white missionaries and teachers, staged a parade of 10,000 on the track. A New York Tribune correspondent witnessed the event, describing “a procession of friends and mourners as South Carolina and the United States never saw before.”

The procession was led by 3,000 black schoolchildren carrying armloads of roses and singing the Union marching song “John Brown’s Body.” Several hundred black women followed with baskets of flowers, wreaths and crosses. Then came black men marching in cadence, followed by contingents of Union infantrymen. Within the cemetery enclosure a black children’s choir sang “We’ll Rally Around the Flag,” the “Star-Spangled Banner” and spirituals before a series of black ministers read from the Bible.

After the dedication the crowd dispersed into the infield and did what many of us do on Memorial Day: enjoyed picnics, listened to speeches and watched soldiers drill. Among the full brigade of Union infantrymen participating were the famous 54th Massachusetts and the 34th and 104th United States Colored Troops, who performed a special double-columned march around the gravesite.

The war was over, and Memorial Day had been founded by African-Americans in a ritual of remembrance and consecration. The war, they had boldly announced, had been about the triumph of their emancipation over a slaveholders’ republic. They were themselves the true patriots.

Despite the size and some newspaper coverage of the event, its memory was suppressed by white Charlestonians in favor of their own version of the day. From 1876 on, after white Democrats took back control of South Carolina politics and the Lost Cause defined public memory and race relations, the day’s racecourse origin vanished.

Indeed, 51 years later, the president of the Ladies’ Memorial Association of Charleston received an inquiry from a United Daughters of the Confederacy official in New Orleans asking if it was true that blacks had engaged in such a burial rite in 1865; the story had apparently migrated westward in community memory. Mrs. S. C. Beckwith, leader of the association, responded tersely, “I regret that I was unable to gather any official information in answer to this.”

Beckwith may or may not have known about the 1865 event; her own “official” story had become quite different and had no place for the former slaves’ march on their masters’ racecourse. In the struggle over memory and meaning in any society, some stories just get lost while others attain mainstream recognition.

AS we mark the Civil War’s sesquicentennial, we might reflect on Frederick Douglass’s words in an 1878 Memorial Day speech in New York City, in which he unwittingly gave voice to the forgotten Charleston marchers.

He said the war was not a struggle of mere “sectional character,” but a “war of ideas, a battle of principles.” It was “a war between the old and the new, slavery and freedom, barbarism and civilization … and in dead earnest for something beyond the battlefield.” With or against Douglass, we still debate the “something” that the Civil War dead represent.

The old racetrack is gone, but an oval roadway survives on the site in Hampton Park, named for Wade Hampton, former Confederate general and the governor of South Carolina after the end of Reconstruction. The old gravesite of the Martyrs of the Race Course is gone too; they were reinterred in the 1880s at a national cemetery in Beaufort, S.C.

But the event is no longer forgotten. Last year I had the great honor of helping a coalition of Charlestonians, including the mayor, Joseph P. Riley, dedicate a marker to this first Memorial Day by a reflecting pool in Hampton Park.

By their labor, their words, their songs and their solemn parade on their former owners’ racecourse, black Charlestonians created for themselves, and for us, the Independence Day of a Second American Revolution.

David W. Blight, a professor of history and the director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale, is the author of the forthcoming “American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era.”

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WORLD NO-TOBACCO DAY: MAY 31, 2011

 

WORLD NO TOBACCO DAY

Quick Facts

World No Tobacco Day draws attention to the health problems caused by tobacco use.

Local names

Name Language
World No Tobacco Day English
Día Mundial Sin Tabaco Spanish

World No Tobacco Day 2011

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

World No Tobacco Day 2012

Thursday, May 31, 2012
See list of observations below

People, non-governmental organizations and governments unite on World No Tobacco Day to draw attention to the health problems that tobacco use can cause. It is held on May 31 each year.
Hand saying no thanks to a packages of cigarettes offered
World No Tobacco Day focuses on informing people about health problems associated with tobacco use. ©iStockphoto.com/Anneke Schram

What do people do?

World No Tobacco Day is a day for people, non-governmental organizations and governments organize various activities to make people aware of the health problems that tobacco use can cause. These activities include:

  • Public marches and demonstrations, often with vivid banners.
  • Advertising campaigns and educational programs.
  • People going into public places to encourage people to stop smoking.
  • The introduction of bans on smoking in particular places or types of advertising.
  • Meetings for anti-tobacco campaigners.

Moreover, laws restricting smoking in particular areas may come into effect and wide reaching health campaigns may be launched.

Public life

World No Tobacco Day is not a public holiday.

Background

Tobacco is a product of the fresh leaves of nicotiana plants. It is used as an aid in spiritual ceremonies and a recreational drug. It originated in the Americas, but was introduced to Europe by Jean Nicot, the French ambassador to Portugal in 1559. It quickly became popular and an important trade crop.

Medical research made it clear during the 1900s that tobacco use increased the likelihood of many illnesses including heart attacks, strokes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), emphysema and many forms of cancer. This is true for all ways in which tobacco is used, including:

  • Cigarettes and cigars.
  • Hand rolling tobacco.
  • Bidis and kreteks(cigarettes containing tobacco with herbs or spices).
  • Pipes and water pipes.
  • Chewing tobacco.
  • Snuff.
  • Snus(a moist version of snuff popular in some countries such as Sweden).
  • Creamy snuff (a paste consisting of tobacco, clove oil, glycerin, spearmint, menthol, and camphor sold in a toothpaste tube popular in India).
  • Gutkha (a version of chewing tobacco mixed with areca nut, catechu, slaked lime and other condiments popular in India and South-East Asia).

On May 15, 1987, the World Health Organization passed a resolution, calling for April 7, 1988, to be the first World No Smoking Day. This date was chosen because it was the 40th anniversary of the World Health Organization. On May 17, 1989, the World Health Organization passed a resolution calling for May 31 to be annually known as World No Tobacco Day. This event has been observed each year since 1989.

Themes

The themes of World No Tobacco Day have been:

  • 2009 – Tobacco health warnings.
  • 2008 – Tobacco-free youth.
  • 2007 – Smoke free inside.
  • 2006 – Tobacco: deadly in any form or disguise.
  • 2005 – Health professionals against tobacco.
  • 2004 – Tobacco and poverty, a vicious circle.
  • 2003 – Tobacco free film, tobacco free fashion.
  • 2002 – Tobacco free sports.
  • 2001 – Second-hand smoke kills.
  • 2000 – Tobacco kills, don’t be duped.
  • 1999 – Leave the pack behind.
  • 1998 – Growing up without tobacco.
  • 1997 – United for a tobacco free world.
  • 1996 – Sport and art without tobacco: play it tobacco free.
  • 1995 – Tobacco costs more than you think.
  • 1994 – Media and tobacco: get the message across.
  • 1993 – Health services: our windows to a tobacco free world.
  • 1992 – Tobacco free workplaces: safer and healthier.
  • 1991 – Public places and transport: better be tobacco free.
  • 1990 – Childhood and youth without tobacco: growing up without tobacco.
  • 1989 – Initial observance.

Symbols

Images that symbolize World No Tobacco Day are:

  • Clean ashtrays with flowers in them.
  • Ashtrays with images of body parts, such as the heart and lungs, which are damaged by tobacco use.
  • No smoking signs.
  • Symbols of death, such as gravestones and skulls, with cigarettes.
  • Images of the diseases caused by tobacco use.

These images are often displayed as posters, on Internet sites and blogs, on clothing and public transport vehicles.

World No Tobacco Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Wed May 31 1989 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Thu May 31 1990 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Fri May 31 1991 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sun May 31 1992 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Mon May 31 1993 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Tue May 31 1994 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Wed May 31 1995 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Fri May 31 1996 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sat May 31 1997 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sun May 31 1998 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Mon May 31 1999 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Wed May 31 2000 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Thu May 31 2001 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Fri May 31 2002 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sat May 31 2003 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Mon May 31 2004 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Tue May 31 2005 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Wed May 31 2006 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Thu May 31 2007 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sat May 31 2008 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sun May 31 2009 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Mon May 31 2010 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Tue May 31 2011 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Thu May 31 2012 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Fri May 31 2013 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sat May 31 2014 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  
Sun May 31 2015 World No Tobacco Day United Nation day  

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INTERNATIONAL DAY OF UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPERS: MAY 29, 2011

 

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPERS

Quick Facts

The International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers is an occasion to pay tribute to people who served in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations.

Local names

Name Language
International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers English
Día Internacional del Personal de Paz de las Naciones Unidas Spanish

International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers 2011

Sunday, May 29, 2011

International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers 2012

Tuesday, May 29, 2012
List of dates for other years

The International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers is a day to remember those who served in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations. They also honor the memory of people who died in the name of peace.
United Nations soldiers stand at the ready.
Many UN workers are remembered for their work in peacekeeping operations. ©iStockphoto.com/ Sean_Warren

What do people do?

Many activities are organized on this day. Activities include:

  • Notes in official UN documents and schedules.
  • Presentations during UN meetings and events.
  • Memorial services and wreath laying events for those who died in peace keeping missions.
  • Presentation of the Dag Hammarskjöld Medal as a way to honor military, police and civilian personnel who lost their lives while working for UN peacekeeping operations.
  • Awarding peacekeeping medals to military and police officers who are peacekeepers.
  • The launch of photographic and multimedia exhibitions on the work of UN peacekeepers.

The events take place in places such as the UN headquarters in New York in the United States, as well as Vienna, Australia, and other locations worldwide.

Public life

The International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers is not a public holiday.

Background

The UN Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO) was founded on May 29, 1948. UNTSO’s task was to assist peacekeepers to observe and maintain a cease-fire. This cease-fire marked the end of the hostilities between Israel and the Arab League forces. The hostilities started after the end of the British Mandate of Palestine on May 14, 1948. On December 11, 2002, the UN General assembly designated May 29 as the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers. The day was first observed on May 29, 2003.

The International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers is a tribute to people who serve or have served in UN peacekeeping operations. The peacekeepers are honored for their high level of professionalism, dedication and courage. People who died for peace are also remembered.

Symbols

UN Peacekeepers are usually clearly recognizable. They often display the UN flag and the letters “UN” on their clothing, equipment and vehicles. They also wear hats, helmets or other clothing with UN colors.

International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu May 29 2003 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Sat May 29 2004 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Sun May 29 2005 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Mon May 29 2006 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Tue May 29 2007 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Thu May 29 2008 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Fri May 29 2009 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Sat May 29 2010 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Sun May 29 2011 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Tue May 29 2012 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Wed May 29 2013 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Thu May 29 2014 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  
Fri May 29 2015 International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers United Nation day  

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