HAPPILY NATURAL: NATURAL FESTIVAL ADDRESSES EPIDEMIC OF DEADLY CHEMICALS IN BEAUTY PRODUCTS

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Happily Natural Day
Ph: 404-981-2797
Natural Festival Addresses Epidemic of Deadly Chemicals in Beauty Products
Atlanta, Georgia – August 08, 2013 – Would you knowingly risk your life to be considered beautiful? Black women are more likely than all other women to die of breast cancer while simultaneously spending more than 7 billion dollars annually on beauty products, more than any other ethnicity. These products are applied daily to the body; on the hair and skin. Unfortunately studies are now showing that many of the ingredients found in cosmetic beauty products; ranging from hair relaxers and shampoos to nail polishes and skin moisturizers have links to not only cancer, but also immune system disorders, infertility, even neurotoxicity and hormone disruption. There is a silent killer in our community; found in the bathrooms of black households throughout the country.
Hair relaxers and skin lighteners that are marketed specifically to black women often contain chemicals that are known to be carcinogenic. Due to poor regulation standards no protection exists for people of color who have traditionally been put at risk in regard to environmental health issues. The responsibility is left to the consumer to discern what is healthiest for them. Unbeknownst to many; the products they may be supporting financially for aesthetic purposes, are poisoning their bodies and causing harm and even death.
Happily Natural Day will address this epidemic of deadly ingredients in beauty products through an innovative workshop featuring L’Angela “Honeysuckle Moon” Lee, natural skin therapist and plant based wellness educator.
“It is necessary to make conscious choices about not only what we elect to put into our bodies as food,” says Lee, “but we must also become knowledgeable about what ingredients we are placing onto our skin as a care regimen,” The alarming revelation of deadly chemicals existing in cosmetic beauty products is ominous when placed in the context of diet related illness in the African American community and its resultant health disparities. However, addressing the issues related to a toxic beauty industry are of paramount importance to the festival founder; Duron Chavis. “Happily Natural Day is bigger than a natural hair event, our focus has been to address the needs of the black community over the past decade”. Happily Natural Day celebrates its 11th year in 2013, launching for the 5th consecutive time in Atlanta Georgia since its inception in Richmond Virginia in 2003.
“The multi-billion dollar cosmetics industry,” Lee continued, “has been structured in the spirit of blind consumption and destructive necessity. This means, essentially, that the masses’ health will suffer significantly as gravely carcinogenic, chemical-based products are topically applied, repeatedly, in an effort to correct or cover up a perceivable problem.” Her workshop Roots, Trees and Flowers is a natural spa session and workshop which shares the sacred approaches to skin maintenance, redirection and rejuvenation through the proper integration of handcrafted, herbotanical and mineral skin care recipes.
Happily Natural Day is free to the public. Attendees are encouraged to attend the African vendor marketplace featuring one of a kind arts and craft items and health and wellness products from businesses from all around the country. The festival takes place at South Cobb Recreation Center 875 Six Flags Dr, Austell, Georgia 30168 on Saturday August 24th from 11 am to 7pm.

About Happily Natural Day

Happily Natural Day has a decade long history of bringing under represented issues in the African American community to light in an entertaining way. From natural haircare to urban agriculture the festival features world renown scholars, beauty professionals, visual and performing artists from around the world. Our vendor marketplace highlights independent business from around the country and our attendees are given a chance to support minority businesses while developing relationships with people of like minds who are dedicated to uplifting community.

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SKYWATCH: PERSEIDS PEAK THIS WEEKEND, SEEING A PLANET DIRECTLY, AND MORE

News

National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

Subaru Sees New “Planet” Directly

August 6, 2013                                                                | A new companion found by direct imaging reveals a potentially cloudless gas giant oddly far from a young sun. > read more

Under Stress, Asteroids May Be Fragile

August 8, 2013                                                                | A new microgravity experiment demonstrates the weird, unstable fluidity of asteroid surfaces, with potential consequences for visiting craft. > read more

Dead Stars Caught Colliding

August 5, 2013                                                                | Astronomers have detected a signal that looks like it’s from two neutron stars crashing together. The observations could be solid evidence for the hypothesized culprits of short gamma-ray bursts. > read more

Curiosity’s Views of Gale Crater

August 6, 2013                                                                  | Since its arrival in August 2012, NASA’s newest robotic rover has been taking snapshots of the flat Martian plain on which it landed and the tantalizing topography that looms in the distance. > read more

Observing

Oshin Zakarian

Get Ready for the 2013 Perseids

August 2, 2013                                                                | Plan to be up late on the nights of August 11-12 and 12-13. Weather permitting, that’s when Perseid meteors will flash across virtually Moonless skies. > read more

Supernova Still Bright in M74

July 28, 2013                                                                | An exploding star in the galaxy M74 in Pisces, discovered on July 25th, was still about magnitude 12.5 as of August 8th — in reach of many backyard telescopes. > read more

Tour August’s Sky by Eye and Ear!

July 26, 2013                                                                  | This month is famous for the Perseid meteor shower, which arrives like  clockwork on the 12th and 13th. It’s also the best time of year to see the beautiful Milky Way arching overhead in early evening. > read more

Community

"Striking Sparks" winners

Len Nelson / SCAS

Wanted: More Young Stargazers

August 7, 2013                                                                | The Astronomical League is tackling a serious threat to the future of organized amateur astronomy: a dearth of stargazers in their teens, 20s, and 30s. > read more

Free eBook: Shooting Stars

August 2, 2013                                                                | Sky & Telescope‘s newest eBook takes a peek into the history, art, and science of meteor-watching. Download FREE with registration. > read more

This Week’s Sky at a Glance

This Week’s Sky at a Glance

August 9, 2013                                                                  | The Perseid meteors are hitting their peak, not much affected by the light of the Moon as it crosses evening constellations. > read more

            SkyWeek Television Show
Watch SkyWeekAs seen on PBS television stations nationwide

Sponsors: Meade Instruments Woodland Hills Camera & Telescope

Click here to watch this week's episode

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HATEWATCH: WHITE STUDENT UNIONS: WHITE NATIONALIST MINOR LEAGUE?

 

White Student Unions: White Nationalist Minor League?

Hatewatch Staff on August 2, 2013, Posted in White Nationalism
Patrick Sharp started Patrick Sharp started “White Student Union” at Georgia State University

Editor’s note: Further information about Sharp’s activities in the white nationalist movement has come to light. Sharp is a member of the white supremacist website Stormfront, where his user profile lists him as a sustaining member who joined in December 2011. The website Liberty Lamp has the screenshots, though it appears Sharp has changed his nickname on both Stormfront and YouTube since Liberty Lamp posted the shots yesterday. As a result, his original username, “psharp94” no longer appears on Stormfront. He is now “sportline” (formerly “frozenpie77”) on Stormfront and “barron levi” (formerly “frozenpie77”) on YouTube.

Matthew Heimbach created quite a stir at Towson University in Baltimore when he created his “White Student Union” last year and proceeded to launch night patrols to keep students safe from black-on-white crime.

Now, such organizations are sprouting on more campuses.  This week, we got news that a White Student Union (WSU) had been formed at George State University in downtown Atlanta. Its mission is to “unite white students to advocate for their interests and the interests of white people, while celebrating heritage, culture, promoting a sense of ‘white identity,’ and working in unison with other campus organizations to tackle issues that affect us all.”

Until yesterday, the WSU’s website linked to the Traditionalist Youth Network (TYN), which it referred to as a “sister organization.” The white nationalist TYN, which was started earlier this year with Heimbach’s help, appears to be serving as an informal umbrella for white student unions.

The Georgia State student newspaper, The Signal, noted yesterday that when the WSU’s founder, Patrick Sharp, an 18-year-old student from Birmingham, Ala., was confronted with some of the images on the TYN site, he denied that his group is racist and said that he invited black students to participate. Soon thereafter, the link and reference to TYN as a sister organization had been erased from the group’s website. The TYN, meanwhile, still lists the Georgia State WSU as a chapter.

Given the TYN’s links to white nationalism and the very public history of the White Student Union at Towson, it seems disingenuous for Sharp to claim that black students are welcome in his White Student Union.

Sharp may not be open about his white nationalism, but he has left Internet footprints that certainly point in that direction. Earlier this year, for example, he posted at the white nationalist American Renaissance site. The post highlighted a book about 1960s civil rights activities in Birmingham, Ala., by “Paul Kersey,” who blogs at Stuff Black People Don’t Like and at the white nationalist site VDARE. “Seeing as how this is my city,” Sharp wrote, “I’ll have to check this out.”

The Atlanta-based blog Biscuette did its own digging into Sharp and his WSU. In a  post yesterday, “le biscuette” noted that on Sharp’s Facebook page his “likes” included the TYN, a “White History Month” page (a sponsor of an upcoming motorcycle ride against a mythical “white genocide”) and Verum Justica, an anti-Islamic group that models itself after ancient Christian crusaders. He also responded to a post by TYN regarding the formation of the WSU. The profile was unavailable yesterday but was back up today. Nevertheless, it appears Sharp has made most of it private, as the more inflammatory “likes” that Biscuette pointed out are no longer visible, nor are most of his posts.

Heimbach is not so coy about his white nationalism. He recently posted a piece on the TYN site titled “I Hate Freedom,” which said: “Non-whites do not have the rights or freedom to move into white nations. This is our home and our kith and kin.”  Further, “Those who promote miscegenation, usury, or any other forms of racial suicide should be sent to re-education centers, not tolerated.”

On its website, the Towson WSU links unabashedly to white nationalist websites and to groups like the Council of Conservative Citizens, the descendant of the White Citizens Councils formed in the Deep South to oppose desegregation in the 1950s and 1960s.  The neo-Confederate League of the South is also listed on the Towson WSU site; the League calls for a second Southern secession and a society dominated by whites. American Renaissance is another link; the group’s founder, Jared Taylor, has claimed that, “When blacks are left entirely to their own devices, Western civilization – any kind of civilization – disappears.”

In May, Heimbach announced that the Towson WSU would merge with the TYN.

Heimbach’s co-administrator at the Traditionalist Youth Network is Matt Parrott, former head of an Indiana chapter of the crudely racist CCC and founder of Lighthouse Literature, a white nationalist online bookstore that closed in July 2012 after about 18 months in business.

Heimbach’s WSU – a direct descendant of his Towson chapter of Youth for Western Civilization, which collapsed in the spring of 2012 – garnered lots of media attention when it launched “campus patrols” ostensibly to protect students from crime. A February post at the Towson WSU site claimed that the patrols were meant to protect students from “black crime.” The post claimed that, “For those who are not Towson students it seems hard to fathom that every single day black predators prey upon the majority white Towson University student body.”

Heimbach is, in fact, extremely active in white nationalist groups. He is the president of what the CCC calls its Baltimore “subchapter.” He’s also a member of the League of the South and a frequent attendee at white nationalist conferences and gatherings like the recent American Renaissance meeting outside Nashville, Tenn., where he asked speakers how to move forward in creating a white homeland.

The Towson WSU’s notoriety has managed to spawn at least one other imitator. This past spring, Richard Railey, a 57-year-old community college student in Texas, started a white student union (not listed at TYN). He is also attempting to establish a “white history month” on campus to combat what he claims is “discrimination against Caucasians,” and he’s trying to get official college recognition of his group. Railey, who is pursuing a degree in applied science, was in the past elected a Tarrant County, Texas, precinct chair and has served as an election judge. In 2012, he complained to the Fort Worth Weekly that the presence of a copy of Ebony magazine at a polling place was “extremely inappropriate and probably a federal election law violation” because it was “an attempt to intimidate, bully, and threaten white voters.”

Railey, who calls himself “Mstr Rick,” keeps a blog, which links to American Renaissance and to the American Freedom Party (formerly American Third Position), a white nationalist political party. He claims that he has become “enamored” of the “White Ethno-Centrist Movement.” “White people are my people,” he writes, and “challenging the deeply entrenched anti-white bias of multiculturalists [sic] orthodoxies is a moral imperative for whites.”

SOURCE

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Newsflash to both of you, Mr. Sharp and Mr. Railey:

You are known by the company that you keep, as your actions speak loud and clear:

“Further information about Sharp’s activities in the white nationalist movement has come to light. Sharp is a member of the white supremacist website Stormfront, where his user profile lists him as a sustaining member who joined in December 2011. The website Liberty Lamp has the screenshots, though it appears Sharp has changed his nickname on both Stormfront and YouTube since Liberty Lamp posted the shots yesterday. As a result, his original username, “psharp94” no longer appears on Stormfront. He is now “sportline” (formerly “frozenpie77”) on Stormfront and “barron levi” (formerly “frozenpie77”) on YouTube.”

“Railey, who calls himself “Mstr Rick,” keeps a blog, which links to American Renaissance and to the American Freedom Party (formerly American Third Position), a white nationalist political party. He claims that he has become “enamored” of the “White Ethno-Centrist Movement.”

As for that last statement you made, Mr. Railey:

“White people are my people,” he writes, and “challenging the deeply entrenched anti-white bias of multiculturalists [sic] orthodoxies is a moral imperative for whites.”

All human beings are your people.

You are just too hateful and racist to see that.

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CARTOON OF THE DAY: PAKISTAN PRISON

pakistan cartoon of the dayArend van Dam studied psychology st the University of Amsterdam and went on to become an illustrator, comic artist and cartoonist.

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INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE WORLD’S INDIGENOUS PEOPLE: AUGUST 9, 2013

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE WORLD’S INDIGENOUS PEOPLE

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of the World’s Indigenous People is observed on August 9 each year to promote and protect the rights of the world’s indigenous peoples.

Local names

Name Language
International Day of the World’s Indigenous People English
Día Internacional de las Poblaciones Indígenas Spanish

International Day of the World’s Indigenous People 2013

Friday, August 9, 2013

International Day of the World’s Indigenous People 2014

Saturday, August 9, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of the World’s Indigenous People is observed on August 9 each year to promote and protect the rights of the world’s indigenous population. This event also recognizes the achievements and contributions that indigenous people make to improve world issues such as environmental protection.

Indigenous cultures across the planet are recognized on International Day of the World’s Indigenous People.Illustration based on artwork from ©iStockphoto.com/Darek Niedzieski/Nicolette Neish/Victor Maffe

What do people do?

People from different nations are encouraged to participate in observing the day to spread the UN’s message on indigenous peoples. Activities may include educational forums and classroom activities to gain an appreciation and a better understanding of indigenous peoples. Events may include messages from the UN secretary general and other key leaders, performances by indigenous artists, and panel discussions on reconciliation.

Public life

The UN’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous People is a United Nations day of observance but it is not a public holiday.

Background

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous People is celebrated on August 9 each year to recognize the first UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations meeting in Geneva in 1982. On December 23, 1994, the UN General Assembly decided that the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People should be observed on August 9 annually during the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People.

In 2004 the assembly proclaimed the Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People (2005-2014). The assembly also decided to continue observing the International Day of Indigenous People annually during the second decade. The decade’s goal was to further strengthen international cooperation for solving problems faced by indigenous peoples in areas such as culture, education, health, human rights, the environment, and social and economic development.

In April 2000, the Commission on Human Rights adopted a resolution to establish the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues that was endorsed by the Economic and Social Council. The forum’s mandate is to discuss indigenous issues related to culture, economic and social development, education, the environment, health and human rights.

Symbols

Artwork by Rebang Dewan, a Chackma boy from Bangladesh, was chosen as the visual identifier of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. It has also been seen on material to promote the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People. It features two ears of green leaves facing each other and cradling a globe resembling planet earth. Within the globe is a picture of a handshake (two different hands) in the middle and above the handshake is a landscape background. The handshake and the landscape background are encapsulated by blue at the top and bottom within the globe.

For this occasion, Rebang Dewan’s artwork is often seen together with a pale blue version of the UN logo with the words “We the peoples” written in the middle. The logo is set on a darker blue background. The UN logo is often associated with marketing and promotional material UN events. It features a projection of a world map (less Antarctica) centered on the North Pole, enclosed by olive branches. The olive branches symbolize peace and the world map represents people in the world.

International Day of the World’s Indigenous People Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Wed Aug 9 1995 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Fri Aug 9 1996 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sat Aug 9 1997 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sun Aug 9 1998 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Mon Aug 9 1999 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Wed Aug 9 2000 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Thu Aug 9 2001 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Fri Aug 9 2002 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sat Aug 9 2003 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Mon Aug 9 2004 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Tue Aug 9 2005 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Wed Aug 9 2006 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Thu Aug 9 2007 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sat Aug 9 2008 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sun Aug 9 2009 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Mon Aug 9 2010 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Tue Aug 9 2011 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Thu Aug 9 2012 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Fri Aug 9 2013 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sat Aug 9 2014 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sun Aug 9 2015 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Tue Aug 9 2016 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Wed Aug 9 2017 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Thu Aug 9 2018 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Fri Aug 9 2019 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance
Sun Aug 9 2020 International Day of the World’s Indigenous People United Nations observance

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IN REMEMBRANCE: 8-4-2013

MICHAEL ANSARA, ACTOR WHO PLAYED COCHISE AND KANG

By ALISON J. PETERSON
Published: August 2, 2013

  • Michael Ansara, a busy and widely recognizable character actor who was best known for portraying American Indians and later a Klingon in three different “Star Trek” series, died on Wednesday at his home in Calabasas, Calif. He was 91.

NBC, via Photofest

Michael Ansara in “Star Trek” as the Klingon leader Kang.

NBC, via Photofest

Mr. Ansara in “Law of the Plainsman” as an Apache lawman.

NBC, via Photofest

Mr. Ansara in the television series “I Dream of Jeannie”.

His former agent, Michael B. Druxman, announced the death on Friday, saying the cause was complications of Alzheimer’s disease.

Born in Syria, Mr. Ansara mostly played ethnic roles, Indians being a particular specialty. He became a star in the 1950s on the ABC television show “Broken Arrow,” a fictionalized account of the friendship between the Apache chief Cochise, played by Mr. Ansara, and the Indian agent Tom Jeffords, played by John Lupton.

“Broken Arrow” was on the air from 1956 to 1958. A year later, Mr. Ansara was back on television as another Apache, on the short-lived NBC series “Law of the Plainsman.” This time he played a United States marshal with a Harvard degree.

Indian roles kept coming, on shows like “Wagon Train” and “Gunsmoke” and in movies like “Texas Across the River” (1966). But he was also cast as an Egyptian taskmaster in “The Ten Commandments,” the 1956 epic with Charlton Heston; as Judas Iscariot in “The Robe” (1953), with Richard Burton and Jean Simmons; and an Arabian prince who kidnaps an American movie star, played by Elvis Presley, in “Harum Scarum” (1965).

His long résumé included characters who were Italian, Hispanic and, once in a while, even Americans of no particular ethnicity.

In one of his most memorable roles he embodied another species altogether, as the evil Klingon leader Kang in “Star Trek.” He played the part, complete with wing-like eyebrows, on the original television series in 1968 and reprised the role for two of its TV descendants: “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” and “Star Trek: Voyager.” He was one of a handful of actors to play the same part on three different “Star Trek” series.

Mr. Ansara was a guest star on many of the most well-known television series of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, including “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin,” “The Rifleman,” “The Untouchables,” “Perry Mason,” “The Outer Limits,” “Ben Casey,” “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” “Lost in Space,” “Bewitched,” “The Fugitive,” “The Mod Squad,” “The Streets of San Francisco,” “Hawaii 5-0” and “Kojak.”

He last appeared on screen in “Long Road Home,” an independent film made in 1999, in which he played a man who unexpectedly becomes the guardian of his estranged grandson. Most recently he provided the voice of Mr. Freeze in the animated TV series “Batman” and “Batman Beyond.”

Michael Ansara was born on April 15, 1922, in a small town in Syria. His family moved to Massachusetts when he was 2 and Los Angeles when he was 10.

He studied at Los Angeles City College and originally planned to become a doctor, but changed his mind after he began studying acting at the Pasadena Playhouse in an effort to overcome shyness. He began his career onstage and made his screen debut in the 1944 thriller “Action in Arabia.”

Mr. Ansara was married three times. His first marriage, to the actress Jean Byron, who would go on to play the mother on “The Patty Duke Show,” lasted from 1949 to 1956. After his divorce, the publicity department at 20th Century Fox set him up on a date with the actress Barbara Eden, best known as Jeannie on “I Dream of Jeannie.” They were married in 1958.

He later appeared in a few episodes of Ms. Eden’s show, each time as a different character. The two divorced in 1973. They had one son, Matthew, who died of an accidental drug overdose in 2001.

Mr. Ansara’s survivors include his wife of 36 years, the actress Beverly Kushida; and a sister, Rose Browers.

Although Cochise on “Broken Arrow” was his career-defining role, Mr. Ansara found himself frustrated by its limitations. “Cochise could do one of two things,” he once said: “stand with his arms folded, looking noble; or stand with his arms at his sides, looking noble.”

SOURCE

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NATALIE DE BLOIS, AN ARCHITECT WHOSE WORK STOOD OUT, EVEN IF SHE DID NOT

Demetrius Freeman/The New York Times

Natalie de Blois helped guide the design of buildings like the Lever House, whose suave steel-and-glass facades still exude the cool confidence of postwar Park Avenue.

By

Published: July 31, 2013

  • In architecture’s “Mad Men” era, there was a woman.

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Ms. de Blois, a senior designer at the architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, was the hidden hand behind a number of modernist buildings in New York.

David W. Dunlap/The New York Times

The former Union Carbide headquarters, the tall tower at center, was another of Ms. de Blois works.

David W. Dunlap/The New York Times

The Pepsi-Cola headquarters.

Almost invisibly in her own day, Natalie de Blois, of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, helped guide the design of three of the most important corporate landmarks of the 1950s and ‘60s — the headquarters of Lever Brothers, Pepsi-Cola and Union Carbide — whose suave steel-and-glass facades still exude the cool confidence of postwar Park Avenue.

“There wasn’t anybody in the country quite like Natalie, because there was no one else working for a firm quite like Skidmore,” said Beverly Willis, the founder and chairwoman of the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation in New York, which seeks to raise the general consciousness about the role of women in the building industry.

“At that point, there were only five or six women across the U.S. who had a substantial architectural practice,” Ms. Willis said. “And, of course, Natalie was doing bigger buildings, and she was doing them in the heart of Manhattan. These were celebrated buildings that the press fawned over, but Natalie’s name was never mentioned.”

Gordon Bunshaft was the Skidmore partner whose name is most closely associated with the Union Carbide Corporation Headquarters of 1960, 270 Park Avenue, now the headquarters of JPMorgan Chase & Company; Lever House of 1952, 390 Park Avenue; and the former Pepsi-Cola Corporation World Headquarters of 1960, 500 Park Avenue.

“Natalie and Gordon Bunshaft were a team,” Ms. Willis said. “He took all the credit and she did all the work.”

Debates can always be had about the provenance of almost any significant architectural project, particularly one coming out of an office as large and collaborative as Skidmore (where my father was a partner until his death in 1973). No one person can ever wholly claim credit.

But there is little doubt that Ms. de Blois, who died last week, was long denied her due. That was acknowledged 40 years ago by Nathaniel A. Owings, a founding partner of the firm, in his autobiography, “The Spaces In Between: An Architect’s Journey.”

Of Ms. de Blois, he wrote: “Her mind and hands worked marvels in design — and only she and God would ever know just how many great solutions, with the imprimatur of one of the male heroes of S.O.M., owed much more to her than was attributed by either S.O.M. or the client.”

God knew she was often slighted.

Just before a meeting about the International Arrivals Building planned at Idlewild Airport (now Kennedy International), Mr. Bunshaft looked at Ms. de Blois and said: “You can’t come to the meeting unless you go home first and change your clothes. I don’t like green.” Ms. de Blois did just that, she recalled in a 2004 interview in the S.O.M. Journal.

Ms. de Blois was pregnant with the third of her four sons — Frank, Robert, Patrick and Nicholas — when she was invited to the opening of the Connecticut General Life Insurance Company Headquarters in Bloomfield, Conn., on which she had worked. “You know,” Mr. Bunshaft said, “don’t come to the opening if you haven’t had that baby yet.”

Perhaps she persevered in the face of such treatment because construction ran in her blood. She was born on April 2, 1921, in Paterson, N.J. Her father, an engineer like his father and his father’s father, encouraged his daughter when she dreamed of becoming an architect.

After she received an architecture degree from Columbia University in 1944, Ms. de Blois began working at a small firm on East 57th Street. When she resisted a colleague’s romantic advances, she was let go because he said he couldn’t concentrate with her around. But her boss did her a favor: he introduced her to Louis Skidmore, whose office was downstairs.

Mr. Skidmore hired her. She practiced in New York until the early 1960s, when she moved to Skidmore’s Chicago office, where she was made an associate partner. Over time, her portfolio included the Terrace Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, the Hilton Hotel in Istanbul and the Equitable Building in Chicago. She left the firm in 1974, having never been elevated to full partnership.

By then, however, her reputation had begun to catch up with her achievements.

“When I was a young architect in the ‘70s and ‘80s, there weren’t that many older women architects who had worked on a scale other than domestic,” said Sara Caples, a principal in Caples Jefferson Architects in Long Island City, Queens. “It was definitely encouraging to know that was out there.”

The more she learned, Ms. Caples said, the more she appreciated the fact that Ms. de Blois was not simply a female architect, but a good one.

“She was a designer who was a great practitioner of lightness in architecture,” Ms. Caples said, “with an elegant sense of proportion.”

Ms. de Blois died on July 22 in Chicago, at 92.

Her buildings survive. Beautifully.

SOURCE

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GEORGE SCOTT, SLUGGER WHO BOOMED ‘TATERS’ IN FENWAY

Associated Press

George Scott, standing left, with, from left, Carlton Fisk, Jim Rice and Butch Hobson after a 1977 game against Baltimore.

By

Published: July 29, 2013

  • George Scott, whose slugging and sharp fielding at first base helped propel the Boston Red Sox to their 1967 “Impossible Dream” American League pennant, died on Sunday in Greenville, Miss. He was 69.

His death was confirmed by the Washington County coroner, Methel Johnson, The Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville reported. The Boston Herald said in November that Scott had diabetes and had difficulty walking.

Playing 14 seasons in the major leagues, the right-handed-batting Scott was a three-time All-Star and hit 271 home runs, or taters, as he called them. He was credited with popularizing the term in the 1970s, though its precise origin as a baseball expression is murky.

Scott hit 19 home runs, drove in 82 runs and batted .303 for the 1967 Red Sox. His batting average was fourth best in the American League.

The Sox won the pennant — their first in 21 years — on the season’s final day after finishing in ninth place the previous year. The team’s formidable roster also included Carl Yastrzemski, Tony Conigliaro and Rico Petrocelli and the pitching ace Jim Lonborg. But the Red Sox lost the World Series in seven games to the St. Louis Cardinals.

Listed at 6 feet 2 inches and 210 pounds, Scott was evidently well over that, to the consternation of Dick Williams, the manager of the ’67 Sox. But Scott was agile at first base, winning eight Gold Glove awards. He also occasionally played third base.

Scott became known as the Boomer — a designation later bestowed on the free-spirited and outsized pitcher David Wells — for his prodigious home runs.

But a tater was a tater, no matter the length.

“Anything over 450 feet, I’d call it a long tater,” Scott told The Clarion-Ledger of Jackson, Miss., in 2007. “A short tater was one that barely got over the wall.”

George Charles Scott Jr. was born on March 23, 1944, in Greenville, the youngest of three children. His father, a laborer in cotton fields, died when he was a baby. His mother, Magnolia, worked several jobs to support the family. Scott was a baseball, basketball and football star in high school before being signed by the Red Sox in 1962.

As a rookie in 1966, he hit 27 home runs and was named an All-Star, though he led the league in strikeouts with 152.

Scott played for the Red Sox through the 1971 season and then was traded to the Milwaukee Brewers. He tied Reggie Jackson, then with the Oakland A’s, for the league lead in home runs in 1975 with 36 and was No. 1 in runs batted in that season with 109.

He returned to the Red Sox in 1977, played two full seasons in his second stint in Boston, and then split the 1979 season with the Red Sox, the Kansas City Royals and the Yankees before retiring.

He had 1,992 hits, 1,051 R.B.I. and a .268 batting average for his career.

Despite his battles with his weight, he stole 10 bases for the ’67 Red Sox and 16 for the ’72 Brewers.

A list of survivors was not immediately available.

After leaving the major leagues, Scott played and managed in the Mexican League and managed independent teams in the minors.

He was honored by the Brewers in April with a bobblehead giveaway day. One of the most popular Red Sox players of his time, he was inducted into the team’s Hall of Fame in 2006 and followed the Sox closely on TV.

“I don’t watch the Brewers,” he told The Boston Herald last year. “I don’t watch the Royals. I don’t watch the Yankees. But I watch the Red Sox, every pitch.”

SOURCE

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EILEEN BRENNAN, STALWART OF FILM AND STAGE

Warner Brothers Pictures, via Associated Press

Eileen Brennan as Capt. Doreen Lewis in “Private Benjamin.”

By

Published: July 30, 2013

  • Eileen Brennan, a smoky-voiced actress who had worked in show business for more than 20 years before gaining her widest attention as a gleefully tough Army captain in both the film and television versions of “Private Benjamin,” died on Sunday at her home in Burbank, Calif. She was 80.

Columbia Pictures, via Photofest

Ms. Brennan in the 1971 film “The Last Picture Show.”

Her manager, Kim Vasilakis, confirmed the death on Tuesday, saying the cause was bladder cancer.

Ms. Brennan had had a solid career on the New York stage and in films like “The Last Picture Show” and “The Sting” when she was cast for the film “Private Benjamin,” a 1980 box-office hit starring Goldie Hawn in the title role.

Ms. Brennan played Capt. Doreen Lewis, the slow-burning commanding officer of a pampered, privileged young woman who joins the Army and finds that she isn’t anybody’s little princess anymore. The performance brought Ms. Brennan an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actress. She reprised the role in 1981 in a CBS sitcom based on the film, with Lorna Patterson in the Goldie Hawn role. The TV performance brought Ms. Brennan the Emmy Award for best supporting actress in a comedy, variety or music series.

But she was forced to leave “Private Benjamin” when she was hit by a car and critically injured in Venice, Calif. Without her, the series died in 1983.

While recovering Ms. Brennan became addicted to pain medication and underwent treatment. She later developed breast cancer.

She returned to television in 1985 in a new sitcom, “Off the Rack,” with Edward Asner, but the show lasted only six episodes. Afterward she made guest appearances on other shows, but she never recaptured the attention she had known in the past — as the toast of Off Broadway in “Little Mary Sunshine,”as a film actress in the 1970s, and as an honored comedy star just before her accident.

Verla Eileen Regina Brennen was born on Sept. 3, 1932, and grew up in Los Angeles, the daughter of a newspaper reporter who also worked in sales and a former actress. Later in life, dealing with her own alcohol dependency, she talked about the alcoholism in her family when she was a child.

After attending Georgetown University, she studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, performed in summer stock and worked as a singing waitress.

Her first big role was as the title character in Rick Besoyan’s “Little Mary Sunshine,” a 1959 parody of operettas that played at the Orpheum Theater. She won an Obie Award for her portrayal of the show’s spunky, fluttery-eyed heroine. A year later she complained to The New York Times that she had been “hopelessly typecast as that kookie girl.”

Perhaps to prove otherwise, she promptly starred in the national tour of “The Miracle Worker,” as Helen Keller’s gravely serious teacher, Annie Sullivan.

In 1963, Ms. Brennan earned positive reviews as Anna in a City Center revival of “The King and I.” In 1964, she was cast as Irene Molloy, the young widow, in the original Broadway production of “Hello, Dolly!,” with Carol Channing.

Among later stage performances, she appeared in John Ford Noonan’s “A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talking,” a critically praised 1980 two-woman show with Susan Sarandon, and Martin McDonagh’s dark comedy “The Cripple of Inishmaan” (1998), in which she played an alcoholic Irishwoman.

Ms. Brennan made her television debut in “The Star Wagon,” a 1966 PBS special, based on Maxwell Anderson’s play about a man who invented a time machine. Her film debut came a year later, in “Divorce American Style,” a comedy starring Debbie Reynolds and Dick Van Dyke.

After a brief stint as an original cast member (along with Ms. Hawn) of “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In,” the 1960s sketch-comedy series, she did her first picture, playing a world-weary Texas waitress in “The Last Picture Show” (1971), directed by Peter Bogdanovich.

Mr. Bogdanovich cast her again in “Daisy Miller” (1974), as a society hostess, and in “At Long Last Love” (1975), as a singing maid.

Ms. Brennan played a madam with a heart of gold in the Oscar-winning 1973 film “The Sting” and appeared in two comedy-noir films written by Neil Simon, “Murder by Death” (1976) and “The Cheap Detective” (1978).

In later years, she appeared in “Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous” (2005), as William Shatner’s mother (despite being a year younger than he was). But she was most visible making guest appearances on television.

In addition to the Emmy she won, Ms. Brennan received six other Emmy nominations. Two were for “Private Benjamin.” The others were for her work in “Taxi,” “Newhart,” “Thirtysomething” and “Will & Grace,” in which she played Sean Hayes’s formidable acting teacher.

Throughout her career she talked openly about addiction. “It’s so horrible and it can be so disastrous, yet there’s something about the sensitivity of the human being that has to face it,” she said in a 1996 interview. “We’re very sensitive people with a lot of introspection, and you get saved or you don’t get saved.”

Ms. Brennan was married from 1968 to 1974 to David John Lampson, an aspiring actor. Their two sons, Patrick and Sam, survive her, along with a sister, Kathleen Howard, and two grandchildren.

SOURCE

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FROM SUNDAY REVIEW

Readers’ Submissions
Louise Whitbeck Fraser

Forgotten Heroes

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

In response to an essay by Margalit Fox, we asked readers to submit stories of people who had an impact on society but had been lost to history. Here is a selection of the submissions.

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HATEWATCH: OATH KEEPERS RALLY REVEALS RADICAL POLITICS OF GROUP

Oath Keepers Rally Reveals Radical Politics of Group

Ryan Lenz on July 25, 2013,

Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes has always trusted his intellectual pedigree to keep him above the fray.

Boasting a Yale Law School degree and a smooth-talking manner, Rhodes from the start described the group he formed in 2009 — made up largely of law enforcement officials and past and present members of the military — as merely standing up for the Constitution and American liberties. When he urged his members to resist orders to impose martial law or create detention camps, he said, his were merely theoretical worries. After all, he said, Hessian mercenaries once did help the British during the American Revolution and Japanese Americans were rounded up and detained in internment camps during World War II.

He was no conspiracy theorist.

But nearly four years later, if there were any questions still remaining about what the Oath Keepers really are, an event the group has planned for this weekend should lay them all to rest. Starting on Friday at the Farragut State Park outside Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, the Oath Keepers are hosting the Northwest Patriots and Self Reliance Rally. The lineup of participating allies is revealing.

There will be a workshop on colloidal silver — a substance that many on the radical right believe is a cure for all kinds of ailments that the government has kept secret from the people. In fact, the substance has no known medical use and, if used with the frequency that some radicals do, turns human skin blue.

There will be seminars on Agenda 21, a United Nations sustainability plan that has no legal enforcement mechanisms or requirements, but that the radical right is convinced is a secret plot to impose socialism on the United States.

There will be representatives from the John Birch Society — a primary proponent of the Agenda 21 conspiracy theory, the idea that fluoridation of water is a Communist plot, and the charge that President Dwight D. Eisenhower was a Communist agent. Also scheduled to attend are Sheriff Richard Mack, a long-time darling of the antigovernment “Patriot” movement who has been encouraging county sheriffs to resist federal gun laws, and Chuck Baldwin, a far-right pastor and “constitutionalist” who moved to Montana several years ago to battle the incursions of the federal government.

Also featured will be training sessions on hand-to hand combat, nighttime military patrols, survival firearms, and preparation of “bug-out bags” — all of these an obvious reflection of the radical right’s obsessive fear that the government is about to move against the American people, seizing their guns and ending liberty.

“If you’re concerned about the future of America, if you’ve awakened to the peril facing our American heritage, our Judeo Christian way of life and the very existence of our future as a nation, if you realize the importance of preparing for an uncertain future and striving for a self-sufficient lifestyle, then there will only be one place to be,” a promotional radio advertisement about the rally says.

These kind of end-of-freedom fears are not new. So-called “preparedness expos” were common during the first wave of the antigovernment “Patriot” movement during the 1990s. Toward the end of that decade, with many on the far right predicting a “Y2K” crash at the millennial date change, tens of thousands of those on the right rushed to the expos to prepare for imminent hard times.

All this seems to obviously fly in the face of Rhodes’ assertion that he is no conspiracy theorist of wild-eyed radical. But, in fact, almost since the beginning, the Oath Keepers struggled to explain away the extremism in their ranks.

Last year, Rhodes and others raced to distance themselves from Charles Dyer, a former Marine and self-described Oath Keeper who led police on a cross-country chase amid allegations he raped his 7-year-old daughter. Although many Oath Keepers claimed Dyer was the victim of a government conspiracy to silence Patriots, he was later convicted.

In 2011, hundreds of armed Oath Keepers descended on the tiny town of Quartzsite, Ariz., to weigh in on a fight between the town’s elected officials, arguing, in effect, that the tiny, desert outpost was the first battle in the fight against the much-feared, socialistic “New World Order.”

Most recently, Mark Kessler, a self-described Oath Keeper and police chief in tiny Gilberton, Penn., formed a paramilitary militia group called the Constitutional Security Force to fight against proposed gun control legislation. Few knew of it until this week, when Kessler posted a profanity-laced video online that got wide attention. “Fuck all you lib-tards out there,” a heavily armed Kessler says in the video. “As a matter of fact, read my shirt,” he says, turning around to show the camera a T-shirt printed with the words, “Liberals take it in the ass.”

Rhodes has shown his paranoia about a coming dictatorship, or loss of freedom, before. Two years ago, he moved to Montana to be part of an “American Redoubt” to make a kind of last-ditch defense of the Constitution. Now, with his latest set of friends in Idaho, he seems to have gone even further to the extreme right.

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