HATEWATCH: NEW RACIAL INCIDENT HITS TEXAS TOWN, SITE OF TRUCK-DRAGGING MURDER

New Racial Incident Hits Texas Town, Site of Truck-Dragging Murder

by Don Terry on June 5, 2013

After watching a surveillance video of two white male police officers slam a black woman’s head into a countertop and yank her to the floor by her hair in the town lockup, the Jasper, Texas, City Council voted unanimously on Monday to fire the men, less than a month after the brief but violent encounter on a Sunday morning in May.

Jasper Police Brutality

The incident has awakened the East Texas town’s ghosts.

The officers were fired four days before the 15th anniversary this Friday of one of the most horrific racially motivated murders in recent U.S. history – the truck-dragging slaying of Jasper resident James Byrd Jr., a 49-year-old black man.

On the night of June 7, 1998, three white men chained Byrd to their pickup by his ankles and dragged him three miles along a remote country road to his death, decapitating him and scattering pieces of his body in over 75 locations. The men, two of whom were known white supremacists, were convicted in the murder and, in 2011, one of them was executed. Another remains on death row, pending continuing appeals, and the third is serving a life term.

Without the legacy of that killing, which drew the attention of much of the world, it seems unlikely that this recent clash of black and white in a small East Texas town would have received nearly as much attention.

Resisting arrest charges against the woman, Keyarika Diggles, 25, have  been dropped and the City Council has asked the district attorney to  explore criminal charges against the fired officers – Ricky Grissom and  Ryan Cunningham.

“People hear Jasper, Texas, and they think James Byrd,” Christine Stetson, one of the lawyers representing Diggles, told Hatewatch. “I think it’s impossible to have behavior like this on the part of law enforcement and have it not create fear on the part of African-American citizens in Jasper. It brings back terrible memories for lots and lots of people who live there.

“Jasper wants to think they have come a long way from 1998 to today,” Stetson added. “I think city officials have told the world, ‘We’ve made leaps and bounds,’ and then you see this and you say to yourself, ‘Really how far have we come?’”

Stetson and her firm are also representing Rodney Pearson, Jasper’s first black police chief, who was fired last year by the City Council. Pearson is suing Jasper in federal court, alleging he was terminated because of his race. His firing, according to black community leaders, left racial tension in the town of about 8,000 residents at “an all-time high.”

But Jasper’s mayor, Mike Lout, who is white, told Hatewatch that race relations in Jasper, which he said is almost equally divided between black and white, are not much different than anywhere else.

“Jasper was one of the first towns around here to integrate the schools,” Lout said. “It was one of the first towns around here to have a black mayor and a black president of the school board.

“I remember when people said the town was so divided, when James Byrd got killed,” the mayor continued. “I don’t think it was all that divided. Everybody I knew thought how horrible it was.”

Lout said that when the City Council watched the video of the two officers throwing Diggles to the floor, “everybody was disgusted.”

He said memories of the Byrd case had nothing to do with the decision to fire the officers, a decision, he said, “I think everybody is pretty happy about.”

“I wouldn’t give a damn if everybody involved was all black or all white,” the mayor said. “Mistreating people is mistreating people.”

Lout said police took Diggles into custody at her home on May 5, a Sunday morning, for failing to pay a $320 fine for an earlier disorderly conduct offense. He said she was taken to the town lockup, where she was allowed to make a telephone call in an attempt to raise the money for the fine.

During the video of the incident, one of the officers is seen suddenly hanging up the phone as Diggles is using it. She looks disgusted and walks away, apparently saying something to the officer. There’s no audio on the video.

Lout said she had been on the phone for 48 minutes when the officer disconnected the call, telling her he had to get back out on the street.

Diggles and the officer seem to be exchanging angry words as the officer backs her up against a wall. They begin wrestling when a second officer appears, and the officers together slam Diggles, head first, into a countertop. Then one of officers grabs Diggles by the hair and she is yanked to the floor.

They handcuff her and then one of the officers grabs by her the ankle and attempts to drag her across the floor toward a cell. But her shoe comes off and the officer stumbles and falls. He regains his feet and the two officers drag her into a cell.

Lout said that from watching the video, it was clear that harsh words were exchanged on both sides before the incident turned violent.

“She got mad, they got mad,” he said. “But they’re held to a higher standard. They’re the police.”

Stetson, Diggles’ lawyer, said Diggles is missing a “huge chunk of her hair on top of her head.”

When she was slammed into the countertop, Stetson said, Diggles’ braces were dislodged and she broke a tooth.

“The tooth shattered,” Stetson said. “She’s going to the dentist today to have it removed.”

SOURCE

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Two grown men who were supposed to uphold the law, decide to viciously break it.

Excessive force. Physical assault and battery. Malicious and willful abuse of power under color of authority.

It is a miracle that these two officers were fired. You can count on one hand the number of officers fired for engaging in such abuse of power.

“Stetson, Diggles’ lawyer, said Diggles is missing a “huge chunk of her hair on top of her head.”

What are the odds of Ms. Diggles receiving treatment for her hair that was torn out? Not much chance of that happening.

“When she was slammed into the countertop, Stetson said, Diggles’ braces were dislodged and she broke a tooth.”

“The tooth shattered,” Stetson said. “She’s going to the dentist today to have it removed.”

Obviously they would rather pull her destroyed tooth instead of repairing or replacing it. Easier to just rip it out instead of doing a crown, bridge, or dental implant.

Ms. Diggles should sue for pain and suffering, and for medical expenses incurred due to the two officers ganging upon her and beating her.

Now that they are out of a job due to their actions, they will have plenty of time to contemplate visits to the unemployment office and regret the error of their ways.

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JAMES BYRD, JR. ( MAY 2, 1949 – JUNE 7, 1998): THE TEXAS TRUCK-DRAGGING INCIDENT – 15TH ANNIVERSARY

This Friday, June 7, 2013, will be the 15TH Anniversary of the dragging death of James Byrd in the town of Jasper, Texas.

At the time the public became aware of the incident, it became the most well-known and horrific hate crime to date since the era of lynching of Black Americans in decades.

Three White men, two who were known white supremacists, attacked, viciously beat, and tied Byrd to a pickup truck, driving over an asphalt road, dragging him to his death as his head hit the side of a culvert severing it from his body as pieces of him were left strewn over many miles.

The three men drove Byrd to a secluded area out-of-town, beat him viciously, urinated on him and then chained both his ankles to their pickup truck and proceeded to drag him for three miles. Brewer later claimed that Berry cut Byrd’s throat before he was dragged. Medical examiner and forensic evidence suggested instead that Byrd had been trying to keep his head up while being dragged, as he was pulled behind the pickup truck along the rough country road. An autopsy revealed that Byrd was very much alive during the dragging. Byrd died after his right arm and head were torn after his body hit a culvert Byrd’s brain and skull were found intact, indicating that he was consciousness and fully aware of his tremendous suffering while being dragged.

After dragging Byrd to his death, King, Brewer and Berry threw his remains on the steps of a Black American church located on Huff Creek Road. They then went to a barbecue. When authorities investigated the area where Byrd’s body was dragged, they found a wrench with the name “Berry” written on it and a cigarette lighter with the word “Possum” on it. Possum was King’s prison nickname.  The next morning, pieces of Byrd’s body were found scattered across a seldom-used road. In all, the police found 81 places where Byrd’s remains were scattered. Twenty-four hours later, Jasper’s District Attorney, along with state law enforcement authorities working with the FBI, determined that since Brewer and King were well-known white supremacists, the murder was a hate crime. All three were tried and convicted of murder.

Lawrence Russell Brewer – convicted and sentenced to death; Shawn Allen Berry (driver of truck) – convicted and sentenced to life in prison (parole date: 6/7/2038); John William King, convicted and sentenced to death.

Lawrence Russell Brewer was executed for his part in the murder in the Huntsville Unit on September 21, 2011. The day before his execution, Brewer told  KHOU 11 News in Houston, Texas the following statement: “As far as any regrets, no, I have no regrets. No, I’d do it all over again, to tell you the truth.”

Brewer ordered a large meal before his execution. The meal included two chicken fried steaks, a triple-meat bacon cheeseburger, a large bowl of fried okra, a pound of barbecue, three fajitas, a meat lover’s pizza, a pint of ice cream, and a slab of peanut butter fudge with lots of crushed peanuts. Maybe in an act to thumb his nose or to show some last attempt of contempt, he did not eat any of the meal. The entire meal was thrown out, causing the Texas prison officials to end the 87-year-old traditionof giving last meals to condemned inmates.

Legislation on hate crimes in Texas was stepped up when the  77th Texas Legislature passed the James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Act. With the signature of Governor Rick Perry who took over the balance of Governor George Bush’s unexpired term, the act became Texas state law in 2001.In 2009, the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act expanded the 1969 United States federal hate-crime law to include crimes motivated by a victim’s actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, or disability.

Some time before his death, James Byrd, Jr. was stated to have said he always wanted to be famous. He always wanted to be remembered in people’s mind forever.

Needless to say, he never counted on having to suffer from such an horrific death to forever remain in millions of people’s minds.

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COLORLINES: HOW BAD 3RD GRADE MATH LEGITIMIZES INJUSTICE

How Bad Third-Grade Math Legitimizes Injustice

Two months into sequestration, it’s proving a disaster. And the study that justified it still doesn’t add up.

Economic Justice contributor Imara Jones reports.

Report: Immigration Enforcement Takes Heavy Toll On Kids’ Physical And Mental Health

Seth Freed Wessler looks at a new report that reveals immigration reform could save thousands of children from suffering.

Got a Question About LGBT Organizing in the South? Let’s Hear It

At 2pm EST on Tuesday, June 11, Jamilah King will host a live video chat with LGBT rights organizers in the South.

Kid President’s Got a Plan to Fix U.S. Education [VIDEO] Everyone’s favorite future president has a message for the country.

Susan Rice Becomes Third African American to Lead National Security This week President Obama announced he would assign U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice to the role of national security advisor.

Civil Rights Activist Chokwe Lumumba Elected Mayor of Jackson, Miss. The former Jackson City Councilman received about 85 percent of the vote.

‘Awkward Black Girl’ Issa Rae to Play Role as Nina Simone ‘Rae will play Nina Simone in an upcoming biopic of Lorraine Hansberry.

Brittney Griner’s Nike Contract Just the Latest of Her Barrier-Breaking Moves Not only is Griner the first openly gay athlete to sign with Nike, her contract will allow her to wear clothes branded as menswear.

Good News in Mississippi: School-To-Prison Pipeline Closes A consent decree essentially cancels most, if not all, police intervention for any issues that can’t be “safely and appropriately handled under school disciplinary procedures.”

Cheerios Ad Starring Interracial Family Ignites Racist Hate Storm Last week Cheerios released a commercial featuring an interracial couple and their daughter and you’d think it would be no big deal. Not so.

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WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY: JUNE 5, 2013

 

WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY

Quick Facts

World Environment Day is held each year on June 5. It is one of the  principal vehicles through which the United Nations (UN) stimulates worldwide  awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and action.

Local names

Name Language
World Environment Day English
Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente Spanish

World Environment Day 2013

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

World Environment Day 2014

Thursday, June 5, 2014

World Environment Day is held each year on June 5. It is one of the principal vehicles through which the United Nations (UN) stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and action.

UN Worl Enviroment D ayWorld Environment Day promotes ways to improve the earth’s environment, such as conserving forests.

©iStockphoto.com/John Woodworth

What do people do?

World Environment Day is celebrated in many ways in countries such as Kenya, New Zealand, Poland, Spain and the United States. Activities include street rallies and parades, as well as concerts, tree planting, and clean-up campaigns. In many countries, this annual event is used to enhance political attention and action towards improving the environment. This observance also provides an opportunity to sign or ratify international environmental conventions.

Public life

The UN World Environment Day is not a public holiday, so public life is not affected.

Background

World Environment Day was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1972 to mark the opening of the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. Another resolution, adopted by the General Assembly the same day, led to the creation of UNEP. It is hosted every year by a different city and commemorated with an international exposition through the week of June 5.

Symbols

The main colors featured in many promotions for this event are natural colors depicting nature, the earth and its natural resources. These colors are often softer shades of green, brown and blue. Images of natural the earth’s features, such as snowy mountains, clean beaches, unpolluted rivers, and photos of natural flora and fauna, including fern leaves, are used to promote campaigns supporting the day.

World Environment Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Jun 5 1980 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Fri Jun 5 1981 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sat Jun 5 1982 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sun Jun 5 1983 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Tue Jun 5 1984 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Wed Jun 5 1985 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Thu Jun 5 1986 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Fri Jun 5 1987 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sun Jun 5 1988 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Mon Jun 5 1989 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Tue Jun 5 1990 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Wed Jun 5 1991 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Fri Jun 5 1992 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sat Jun 5 1993 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sun Jun 5 1994 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Mon Jun 5 1995 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Wed Jun 5 1996 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Thu Jun 5 1997 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Fri Jun 5 1998 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sat Jun 5 1999 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Mon Jun 5 2000 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Tue Jun 5 2001 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Wed Jun 5 2002 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Thu Jun 5 2003 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sat Jun 5 2004 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sun Jun 5 2005 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Mon Jun 5 2006 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Tue Jun 5 2007 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Thu Jun 5 2008 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Fri Jun 5 2009 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sat Jun 5 2010 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Sun Jun 5 2011 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Tue Jun 5 2012 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Wed Jun 5 2013 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Thu Jun 5 2014 World Environment Day United Nations observance
Fri Jun 5 2015 World Environment Day United Nations observance

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INTERNATIONAL DAY OF INNOCENT CHILDREN VICTIMS OF AGGRESSION: JUNE 4, 2013

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF INNOCENT CHILDREN VICTIMS OF AGGRESSION

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Innocent Children Victims  of Aggression is observed on June 4 each year.

Local names

Name Language
International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression English
Día internacional de los Niños Víctimas Inocentes de Agresión Spanish

International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 2013

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 2014

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression is observed on June 4 each year. The purpose of the day is to acknowledge the pain suffered by children throughout the world who are the victims of physical, mental and emotional abuse. This day affirms the UN’s commitment to protect the rights of children.

UN International Day of Innocent Children Victims of AgressionThis photo is used for illustrative purposes only. It does not imply the attitudes, behaviour or actions of the model in this photo.©iStockphoto.com/Sean_Warren

What do people do?

The International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression celebrates the millions of individuals and organizations working to protect and preserve the rights of children. For example, the Global Movement for Children, with leadership from Nelson Mandela and Graca Machel, is an inspiring force for change that involves ordinary people and families worldwide. The ”Say Yes for Children” campaign, endorsed by more than 94 million people, calls for 10 positive actions to be taken to improve the lives of children.

This day is a time for individuals and organizations all over the world to become aware of the impact of monstrosity of abuse, in all its forms, against children. It is also a time when organizations and individuals learn from or take part in awareness campaigns centered on protecting children’s rights.

Public life

The UN International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

On 19 August 1982, at its emergency special session on the question of Palestine, the General Assembly, appalled at the great number of innocent Palestinian and Lebanese children victims of Israel’s acts of aggression, decided to commemorate June 4 of each year as the International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression. According to the United Nations in China, the statistics of child abuse include:

  • More than two million children killed in conflict in the last two decades.
  • About 10 million child refugees cared for by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR).
  • In the Latin America and in the Caribbean region about 80 thousand children die annually from violence that breaks out within the family.

Child abuse is now in the spotlight of global attention and the UN is working hard to help protect children around the world. One key factor is the process of international negotiation and action centered around the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Sat Jun 4 1983 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Mon Jun 4 1984 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Tue Jun 4 1985 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Wed Jun 4 1986 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Thu Jun 4 1987 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sat Jun 4 1988 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sun Jun 4 1989 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Mon Jun 4 1990 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Tue Jun 4 1991 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Thu Jun 4 1992 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Fri Jun 4 1993 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sat Jun 4 1994 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sun Jun 4 1995 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Tue Jun 4 1996 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Wed Jun 4 1997 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Thu Jun 4 1998 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Fri Jun 4 1999 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sun Jun 4 2000 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Mon Jun 4 2001 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Tue Jun 4 2002 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Wed Jun 4 2003 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Fri Jun 4 2004 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sat Jun 4 2005 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sun Jun 4 2006 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Mon Jun 4 2007 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Wed Jun 4 2008 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Thu Jun 4 2009 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Fri Jun 4 2010 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Sat Jun 4 2011 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Mon Jun 4 2012 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Tue Jun 4 2013 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Wed Jun 4 2014 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance
Thu Jun 4 2015 International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression United Nations observance

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GLOBAL DAY OF PARENTS: JUNE 1, 2013

From the United Nations’ website, June 1, 2013 was Global Day of Parents:

GLOBAL DAY OF PARENTS

The Global Day of Parents is observed on the 1st of June every year. The Day was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in 2012 with resolutionA/RES/66/292 and honours parents throughout the world. The Global Day provides an opportunity to appreciate all parents in all parts of the world for their selfless commitment to children and their lifelong sacrifice towards nurturing this relationship.

In its resolution, the General Assembly also noted that the family has the primary responsibility for the nurturing and protection of children and that children, for the full and harmonious development of their personality, should grow up in a family environment and in an atmosphere of happiness, love and understanding.

The resolution recognizes the role of parents in the rearing of children and invites Member States to celebrate the Day in full partnership with civil society, particularly involving young people and children.”

SOURCE

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WORLD NO TOBACCO DAY: MAY 31, 2013

 

WORLD NO TOBACCO DAY

Quick Facts

World No Tobacco Day draws attention to the health problems caused by tobacco use.

Local names

Name Language
World No Tobacco Day English
Día Mundial Sin Tabaco Spanish

World No Tobacco Day [WHO] 2013

Friday, May 31, 2013

World No Tobacco Day 2014

Saturday, May 31, 2014

People, non-governmental organizations and governments unite on World No Tobacco Day to draw attention to the health problems that tobacco use can cause. It is held on May 31 each year.

Hand saying no thanks to a packages of cigarettes offeredWorld No Tobacco Day focuses on informing people about health problems associated with tobacco use.

©iStockphoto.com/Anneke Schram

What do people do?

World No Tobacco Day is a day for people, non-governmental organizations and governments organize various activities to make people aware of the health problems that tobacco use can cause. These activities include:

  • Public marches and demonstrations, often with vivid banners.
  • Advertising campaigns and educational programs.
  • People going into public places to encourage people to stop smoking.
  • The introduction of bans on smoking in particular places or types of advertising.
  • Meetings for anti-tobacco campaigners.

Moreover, laws restricting smoking in particular areas may come into effect and wide reaching health campaigns may be launched.

Public life

World No Tobacco Day is not a public holiday.

Background

Tobacco is a product of the fresh leaves of nicotiana plants. It is used as an aid in spiritual ceremonies and a recreational drug. It originated in the Americas, but was introduced to Europe by Jean Nicot, the French ambassador to Portugal in 1559. It quickly became popular and an important trade crop.

Medical research made it clear during the 1900s that tobacco use increased the likelihood of many illnesses including heart attacks, strokes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), emphysema and many forms of cancer. This is true for all ways in which tobacco is used, including:

  • Cigarettes and cigars.
  • Hand rolling tobacco.
  • Bidis and kreteks (cigarettes containing tobacco with herbs or spices).
  • Pipes and water pipes.
  • Chewing tobacco.
  • Snuff.
  • Snus (a moist version of snuff popular in some countries such as Sweden).
  • Creamy snuff (a paste consisting of tobacco, clove oil, glycerin, spearmint, menthol, and camphor sold in a toothpaste tube popular in India).
  • Gutkha (a version of chewing tobacco mixed with areca nut, catechu, slaked lime and other condiments popular in India and South-East Asia).

On May 15, 1987, the World Health Organization passed a resolution, calling for April 7, 1988, to be the first World No Smoking Day. This date was chosen because it was the 40th anniversary of the World Health Organization. On May 17, 1989, the World Health Organization passed a resolution calling for May 31 to be annually known as World No Tobacco Day. This event has been observed each year since 1989.

Themes

The themes of World No Tobacco Day have been:

  • 2009 – Tobacco health warnings.
  • 2008 – Tobacco-free youth.
  • 2007 – Smoke free inside.
  • 2006 – Tobacco: deadly in any form or disguise.
  • 2005 – Health professionals against tobacco.
  • 2004 – Tobacco and poverty, a vicious circle.
  • 2003 – Tobacco free film, tobacco free fashion.
  • 2002 – Tobacco free sports.
  • 2001 – Second-hand smoke kills.
  • 2000 – Tobacco kills, don’t be duped.
  • 1999 – Leave the pack behind.
  • 1998 – Growing up without tobacco.
  • 1997 – United for a tobacco free world.
  • 1996 – Sport and art without tobacco: play it tobacco free.
  • 1995 – Tobacco costs more than you think.
  • 1994 – Media and tobacco: get the message across.
  • 1993 – Health services: our windows to a tobacco free world.
  • 1992 – Tobacco free workplaces: safer and healthier.
  • 1991 – Public places and transport: better be tobacco free.
  • 1990 – Childhood and youth without tobacco: growing up without tobacco.
  • 1989 – Initial observance.

Symbols

Images that symbolize World No Tobacco Day are:

  • Clean ashtrays with flowers in them.
  • Ashtrays with images of body parts, such as the heart and lungs, which are damaged by tobacco use.
  • No smoking signs.
  • Symbols of death, such as gravestones and skulls, with cigarettes.
  • Images of the diseases caused by tobacco use.

These images are often displayed as posters, on Internet sites and blogs, on clothing and public transport vehicles.

World No Tobacco Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Wed May 31 1989 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Thu May 31 1990 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Fri May 31 1991 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sun May 31 1992 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Mon May 31 1993 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Tue May 31 1994 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Wed May 31 1995 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Fri May 31 1996 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sat May 31 1997 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sun May 31 1998 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Mon May 31 1999 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Wed May 31 2000 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Thu May 31 2001 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Fri May 31 2002 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sat May 31 2003 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Mon May 31 2004 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Tue May 31 2005 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Wed May 31 2006 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Thu May 31 2007 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sat May 31 2008 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sun May 31 2009 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Mon May 31 2010 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Tue May 31 2011 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Thu May 31 2012 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Fri May 31 2013 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sat May 31 2014 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance
Sun May 31 2015 World No Tobacco Day United Nations observance

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