Monthly Archives: April 2016

WORLD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY DAY [WIPO]: APRIL 26, 2016

World Intellectual Property Day

World Intellectual Property Day is observed on April 26 each year with a variety of events and activities worldwide. It aims to increase people’s awareness and understanding of intellectual property (IP). World Intellectual Property Day is sometimes referred as World IP Day.

World Intellectual Property Day
World Intellectual Property Day focuses on increasing people’s awareness and understanding of all aspects of intellectual property.
©iStockphoto.com/samdiesel

What Do People Do?

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) works together with various government agencies, non-government organizations, community groups and individuals to hold different events and activities to promote World Intellectual Property Day each year. Activities and events may include (but are not exclusive to):

  • Stage concerts or other public performances centered around the around the World IP Day theme, with the performers delivering messages which encourage respect for creators and creativity.
  • Essay competitions for young people on themes relating to intellectual property, innovation, piracy, counterfeiting, and other similar issues.
  • Seminars or free lectures in universities to build awareness of intellectual property and its benefits among students, faculty and researchers.
  • Exhibits in museums, art galleries, schools and other educational institutions, with presentations explaining the link between exhibitions, innovation and intellectual property.

Some local intellectual and copyright offices may have an open day on or around April 26 to promote World IP Day. Some educational institutions may choose World IP Day as a time to celebrate the works of a notable inventor, artist, designer, or entrepreneur, and link discussions with the important role of intellectual property.

Public Life

World Intellectual Property Day, also known as World IP Day, is an observance held in many places around the world. It is not designated as a special public holiday.

Background

WIPO is a specialized agency of the United Nations. It is dedicated to developing a balanced and accessible international intellectual property (IP) system, which rewards creativity, stimulates innovation and contributes to economic development while safeguarding the public interest.

WIPO decided in 2000 to designate an annual World Intellectual Property Day to address the perceived gap between IP as a business/legal concept and its relevance to people’s lives. April 26 was chosen as the date upon which the convention establishing WIPO first entered into force in 1970.

WIPO plays a key role in organizing World IP Day. The activities, events and campaigns that focus on World IP Day seek to increase public understanding of what IP really means, and to demonstrate how the IP system fosters not only music, arts and entertainments, but also all products and technological innovations that help to shape the world.

External Link

World IP Day Official Site

World Intellectual Property Day Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday Type Where It is Observed
Mon Apr 26 2010 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 26 2011 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 26 2012 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Fri Apr 26 2013 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 26 2014 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Sun Apr 26 2015 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 26 2016 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Wed Apr 26 2017 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 26 2018 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Fri Apr 26 2019 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance
Sun Apr 26 2020 World Intellectual Property Day United Nations observance

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WORLD MALARIA DAY [WHO]: APRIL 25, 2016

World Malaria Day

World Malaria Day gives people the chance to promote or learn about the efforts made to prevent and reduce Malaria around the world. It is observed on April 25 each year.

United Nations' World Health Day
Good healthcare is important to prevent and treat diseases such as Malaria.
©iStockphoto.com/Günay Mutlu

What Do People Do?

Organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), which is the United Nations’ (UN) directing and coordinating authority for health, actively play a role in promoting and supporting World Malaria Day. The activities and events that take place on or around World Malaria Day are often joint efforts between governments, non-government organizations, communities and individuals. Countries that have been involved in actively participating in World Malaria Day include (but are not exclusive to):

  • Belgium.
  • Denmark.
  • Ethiopia.
  • Cameroon.
  • Germany
  • Mozambique.
  • Switzerland.
  • Uganda.
  • United States.
  • Zambia

Many people, as well as commercial businesses and not-for-profit organizations, will use the day as an opportunity to donate money towards key malaria interventions. Many fundraising events are held to support the prevention, treatment and control of malaria. Some people may also use the observance to write letters or petitions to political leaders, calling for greater support towards protecting and treating people who are at risk of malaria. Many newspapers, websites, and magazines, as well as television and radio stations, may use World Malaria Day as the chance to promote or publicize awareness campaigns about malaria.

Public Life

World Malaria Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. About half of the worlds’ population is at risk of malaria, particularly those in lower-income countries. It infects more than 500 million people each year and kills more than one million people, according to WHO. However, Malaria is preventable and curable.

The World Health Assembly instituted World Malaria Day in May 2007. The purpose of the event is to give countries in affected regions the chance to learn from each other’s experiences and support one another’s efforts. World Malaria Day also enables new donors to join in a global partnership against malaria, and for research and academic institutions to reveal scientific advances to the public. The day also gives international partners, companies and foundations a chance to showcase their efforts and reflect on how to scale up what has worked.

External Link

WHO Information on World Malaria Day

World Malaria Day Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday Type Where It is Observed
Sun Apr 25 2010 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Mon Apr 25 2011 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Wed Apr 25 2012 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 25 2013 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Fri Apr 25 2014 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 25 2015 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Mon Apr 25 2016 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 25 2017 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Wed Apr 25 2018 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 25 2019 World Malaria Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 25 2020 World Malaria Day United Nations observance

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WORLD IMMUNIZATION WEEK: APRIL 24, 2016

World Immunization Week 2016: Close the immunization gap

World Immunization Week 2016 banner

Immunization game-changers should be the norm worldwide

21 April 2016 — Immunization averts 2 to 3 million deaths annually. However, an additional 1.5 million deaths could be avoided, if global vaccination coverage improves. Today, nearly 1 in 5 children worldwide are still missing routine immunizations for preventable diseases. During World Immunization Week 2016, WHO highlights recent gains in immunization coverage, and outlines further steps needed to meet global vaccination targets by 2020.

World Immunization Week 2016 banner

Immunization for all throughout life

April 2016 — World Immunization Week 2016 is coming soon, 24-30 April, and will focus on “Closing the immunization gap – Immunization for all throughout life”. WHO has designed a campaign toolkit for partners and members of the global immunization community to use to help raise awareness locally. The toolkit contains banners, posters, key messages, a visual identity and campaign guidelines.

Leopold Museum lits up at night, Vienna, Austria

Austria: Measles in the spotlight

7 April 2016 — In Austria, where elimination of measles is tantalizingly close, a creative and innovative campaign seeks to encourage vaccination among unimmunized adults.

Mother with a child, Nepal.

World Immunization Week in Nepal: An anniversary of remembrance

April 2016 — In April 2015, a major earthquake struck Nepal. A year later, people in one village recall their struggles, in its aftermath, to keep their children safe through immunization.

Infographic: Six goals of the Global vaccine action plan

1. Immunization against diphtheria, tetanus
2. Measles mortality reduction
3. Rubella elimination
4. Maternal and neonatal tetanus elimination
5. Polio eradication
6. Use of new or underutilized vaccines

fact buffet

115 millionIn 2014, 115 million infants worldwide received diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.

Fact sheet on immunization coverage

85%In 2014, about 85% of the world’s children received one dose of measles vaccine by their first birthday.

Fact sheet on measles

2 countriesToday, only 2 countries (Afghanistan and Pakistan) remain polio-endemic, down from more than 125 in 1988.

Fact sheet on poliomyelitis


Video

Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective means to help children grow into healthy adults. We have made enormous progress, but 1 in 5 children is still not being reached.

Quiz

Quiz: How much do you know about immunization?

Find out which diseases can be prevented through vaccination, and which disease mainly affects children.



Immunization Week in Regions

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IN REMEMBRANCE: 4-24-2016

PRINCE, MYSTERIOUS, INVENTIVE CHAMELEON OF MUSIC

April 21, 2016 

A musical chameleon and flamboyant showman who never stopped evolving, Prince was one of the music world’s most enigmatic superstars. He celebrated unabashed hedonism, sang of broken hearts and spiritual longing and had a mysterious personal identity that defied easy definition.In such hit songs as “1999,” “Little Red Corvette,” “I Would Die 4 U,” “When Doves Cry” and “Purple Rain,” Prince produced a musical legacy and a provocative stage presence that set him apart from most other entertainers of the 1980s and ’90s.

He won seven Grammy Awards and an Academy Award, and was named in 2004 to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He remained a creative force in recent years and had performed earlier this month but canceled an April 7 appearance in Atlanta because of what a representative called the flu.

His death April 21 at his home in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen, Minn., was a devastating shock to the entertainment world and beyond. He was 57.

His publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, confirmed his death, but the cause was not immediately known.

Prince was a songwriter, musician, producer, choreographer and performer, seemingly in equal measure. He crossed musical genres, from classic rhythm-and-blues to hard rock, funk and jazz, seeking a vision of originality with each incarnation. His primary canvas was, in effect, the studio, where he produced his music with a meticulous eye toward pop perfection.

“Few artists have influenced the sound and trajectory of popular music more distinctly, or touched quite so many people with their talent,” President Obama said in a statement. “As one of the most gifted and prolific musicians of our time, Prince did it all. Funk. R&B. Rock and roll. He was a virtuoso instrumentalist, a brilliant bandleader, and an electrifying performer.”

In 2007, Prince gave what was widely regarded as one of the greatest Super Bowl halftime performances ever, singing “Purple Rain” and other songs in a downpour in Miami. As a songwriter, he penned songs recorded by Chaka Khan (“I Feel for You”), the Bangles (“Manic Monday”) and Sinead O’Connor (“Nothing Compares 2 U”), among other performers.

In 1988, Village Voice critic Robert Christgau declared that Prince’s varied talents made him “the greatest rock-and-roll ­musician of the era — as singer-guitarist-hooksmith-beatmaster, he has no peer.”

When “Little Red Corvette” became a major hit in 1982, it was one of the first songs by a black artist to be in regular rotation on MTV. It was one of the grand party songs of its era, celebrating youthful libido. His crowd-pleasing 1984 song “Let’s Go Crazy” began with a call to prayer — “Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to get through this thing called life” — before becoming a hard-driving dance tune.

His 1984 album “Purple Rain” sold more than 13 million copies in the United States and won two Grammy Awards. He also won an Academy Award for best ­original song score for the semi­autobiographical film of the same name — in which Prince was the central character.

Six of Prince’s songs rank in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the top 500 songs in rock history, including “When Doves Cry” from the album and film “Purple Rain.” The soulful “When Doves Cry” was simultaneously No. 1 on the pop, dance, and soul charts in 1984.

The musically innovative tune had no bass line. Instead, Prince’s keening voice and an insistent rhythm track contributed to the mood of emotional desolation:

How can you just leave me standing?

Alone in a world that’s so cold? (So cold)

Maybe I’m just too demanding

Maybe I’m just like my father too bold

Beyond the erotic indulgences of some songs, Prince also created music of surprising subtlety and depth, showing that rock music could evolve from its adolescent impulses to a more wistful sense of maturity. He challenged Michael Jackson for pop supremacy and acknowledged the influence of such masters as Gaye, James Brown and Jimi Hendrix.

Drummer Ahmir Thompson of the group the Roots, known as Questlove, wrote in Rolling Stone magazine that “Purple Rain” was “a crowning achievement, not only in Prince’s career but for black life — or how blacks were perceived — in the Eighties. It’s the equivalent of Michael Jordan’s 1997 championship games: He was absolutely just in the zone, every shot was going in.”

But the depth, sweep and dynamism of Prince’s music also evoked comparisons with such disparate artists as John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and Madonna. The kaleidoscopic quality of his talent — torn between stardom and artistry — was sometimes vexing. One of his managers told him, “You can’t be both Elvis Presley and Miles Davis.”

From an early age, Prince cultivated a certain sexual and racial ambiguity. He confronted — but did not answer — the questions with his 1981 song “Controversy”: “Am I black or white? / Am I straight or gay? / . . . Was I what you wanted me to be?”

In “I Would Die 4 U,” from 1984, Prince wrote: “I’m not a woman / I’m not a man / I am something that you’ll never understand.”

He deepened the mystery when he officially dropped the name Prince in 1993 and asked to be identified by a visual symbol that could not be pronounced. For seven years, until he reclaimed his crown — and given name — as Prince, he was called “The Artist Formerly Known as Prince” or just “The Artist.”

His goal, he said, was to create a fresh artistic start.

“ ‘Prince is crazy’ — I knew what people were saying,” he told Newsweek in 2004. “When I became a symbol, all the writers were cracking funnies, but I was the one laughing. I knew I’d be here today, feeling each new album is my first.”

He sometimes performed with the word “slave” written on his face, as he fought his record label, Warner Bros., for control of his work. “If you don’t own your masters,” he said, “your master owns you.”

When he broke free of the label in 1996, he released an album fraught with symbolic meaning: “Emancipation.”

Prince Rogers Nelson was born in Minneapolis on June 7, 1958. His father, John Nelson, was a pianist in the jazz group Prince Rogers Trio, which would give the future superstar his name. His mother, the former Mattie Shaw, was a singer in the group.

When the couple divorced, Prince grew estranged from his father. They later reconciled, and John Nelson co-wrote songs with his son, including “Computer Blue” on the album “Purple Rain” and “Scandalous,” from the “Batman” soundtrack (1989).

Early in his career, Prince sometimes said he was the product of an interracial marriage, but in fact both of his parents were African American. He attended a largely black high school in Minneapolis.

Prince began playing piano at age 7 and soon became proficient on other instruments, including guitar, saxophone and drums. When he was 10, he saw James Brown in concert and was transfixed. He determined that he would try to emulate the soul star’s captivating style. He formed his first group in junior high school, began writing music and made a demo tape that attracted interest from Warner Bros. He wrote, produced and performed all the music on his debut album, “For You,” in 1978.

He found success with his second album, “Prince” (1979). The song “I Wanna Be Your Lover” reached No. 1 on Billboard’s R&B chart. With his third album, “Dirty Mind,” he sang explicitly about homosexuality and incest “with a gleeful lasciviousness,” critic Stephen Holden wrote in the New York Times.

“Obviously,” Holden observed, “Prince is not for everyone’s taste. But in today’s conformist pop-funk atmosphere, he stands out as a powerful, if eccentric, original voice.”

More than 30 other albums would follow. In addition to his music, Prince directed and performed in three other films, “Under the Cherry Moon” (1986), “Sign O’ the Times” (1987) and “Graffiti Bridge” (1990).

After leaving Warner Bros. in 1996, Prince started his own record label and a nightclub in Las Vegas. He continued to live near his home town of Minneapolis, where he recorded his music at a 65,000-square-foot studio.

As a reflection of his musical eclecticism, his desk contained photos of jazz giants Charlie Parker and Miles Davis.

In 1996, he married Mayte Garcia, a dancer. The marriage was annulled two years later. They had a son who died in infancy.

His second marriage, to Manuela Testolini, ended in divorce. A complete list of survivors was not available.

Throughout much of the 1990s, Prince kept a low profile as he preferred to be identified by the visual symbol. He re-emerged in his 40s as something of a changed and chastened man, still musically energetic but seeking a kind of spiritual sustenance.

After years in which he gave the impression of being a hedonist, Prince said he had a spiritual rebirth. He stopped swearing, adopted a vegan diet and in 2001 became a Jehovah’s Witness. He also stopped performing some of his more sexually explicit songs, which to some observers was like novelist William Faulkner forsaking Mississippi as a theme.

“There’s certain songs I don’t play anymore, just like there’s certain words I don’t say anymore,” he said in 2004. “It’s not me anymore. Don’t follow me way back there. There’s no more envelope to push. I pushed it off the table. It’s on the floor. Let’s move forward now.”

In recent years, the ­once-sheltered personality of Prince became more outgoing, as he consented to interviews and went on concert tour. He received his most recent Grammy in 2007 for best male R&B vocal performance for the song “Future Baby Mama.”

In a late burst of energy, Prince released four albums in the past two years, and last month announced that he was writing an autobiography titled “The Beautiful Ones,” a reference to a track on the album “Purple Rain.”

“Sometimes I stand in awe of what I do myself,” Prince told the New York Times in 1996. “I feel like a regular person, but I listen to this and wonder, where did it come from? I believe definitely in the higher power that gave me this talent. If you could go in the studio alone and come out with that, you’d do it every day, wouldn’t you?”

SOURCE

So hard to believe that His Royal Purple Badness has left this world.

He blazed onto the scene delivering atmospheric and magnificent music that will stand the test of time.

He wrote and performed music that truly defied any genre: “1999”, an anthem of destruction and of a troubled future; “Little Red Corvette”, a song of a woman who made quite an impression; “Purple Rain”, a song that gave forth the deluge of beautiful other-worldly existence; “When Doves Cry”, a song of sorrow and loss, and so many more too numerous to count.

Prince was his own man and in his battle with the record label Warner Brothers, his writing “Slave” on his forehead was his way of fighting for his integrity and control of his music.

Now, Prince has left us.

For those blessed enough to have seen him in person, I say hold on to those fond memories.

For those of us who never had him grace our presence, be thankful that we lived during a time when Prince walked this earth, and gave to us a legacy of music that touches so many of us in beauty, sorrow, joy, elation, grace and wonder.

Rest in peace, Prince Rogers Nelson.

Rest in peace.

PRINCE-e1461269586400

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE DAY: APRIL 23, 2016

English Language Day

English Language Day is a United Nations (UN) observance that people celebrate on April 23 each year. It coincides withWilliam Shakespeare’s birthday and World Book and Copyright Day.

English is one of the most popular languages used worldwide.
©iStockphoto.com/sqback

Celebrate English Language Day

English Language Day aims to entertain and inform people about the history, culture and achievements associated with the language. The day often features book-reading events, English quizzes, poetry and literature exchanges, and other activities that promote the English language.

Public Life

English Language Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

About English Language Day

English is one of the two working languages of the UN Secretariat and one of the organization’s six official languages. English is often referred to as a “world language”, or the lingua franca (bridge language or common language used by speakers of different languages) of the modern era because it is widely spoken. The UN first celebrated English Language Day on April 23, 2010.

Did You Know?

For a language that was used by only 3 tribes about 1500 years ago, English has official or special status in at least 75 countries with a total population of over two billion.

English Language Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday Type Where It is Observed
Fri Apr 23 2010 English Language Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 23 2011 English Language Day United Nations observance
Mon Apr 23 2012 English Language Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 23 2013 English Language Day United Nations observance
Wed Apr 23 2014 English Language Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 23 2015 English Language Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 23 2016 English Language Day United Nations observance
Sun Apr 23 2017 English Language Day United Nations observance
Mon Apr 23 2018 English Language Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 23 2019 English Language Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 23 2020 English Language Day United Nations observance

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WORLD BOOK AND COPYRIGHT DAY: APRIL 23, 2016

World Book and Copyright Day

April 23 marks the anniversary of the birth or death of a range of well-known writers, including Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Maurice Druon, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Haldor Kiljan Laxness, Manuel Mejía Vallejo, Vladimir Nabokov, Josep Pla and William Shakespeare. For this reason, UNESCO’s General Conference chose this date to pay tribute to books, the authors who wrote them, and the copyright laws that protect them.

World Book and Copyright Day
People of all ages take the time to appreciate books and their authors on World Book and Copyright Day.
©iStockphoto.com/ Ekaterina Monakhova

What Do People Do?

A range of activities to promote reading and the cultural aspects of books are held all over the world. Many of these emphasize international cooperation or friendships between countries. Events include: relay readings of books and plays; the distribution of bookmarks; the announcement of the winners of literary competitions; and actions to promote the understanding of laws on copyright and the protection of authors’ intellectual property.

In some years, the Children’s and Young People’s Literature in the Service of Tolerance is awarded. This is a prize for novels, collections of short stories or picture books that promote tolerance, peace, mutual understanding and respect for other peoples and cultures. There are two categories: one for books aimed at children aged up to 12 years; and one for those aimed at young people aged 13 to 18 years.

Purpose of the day

World Book and Copyright Day is an occasion to pay a worldwide tribute to books and authors and to encourage people to discover the pleasure of reading. It is hoped that this will lead to the renewed respect for those who have made irreplaceable contributions to social and cultural progress. In some years, the UNESCO Prize for Children’s and Young People’s Literature in the Service of Tolerance is awarded. It is also hoped that World Book and Copyright Day will increase people’s understanding of and adherence to copyright laws and other measures to protect intellectual copyright.

Background

The year 1995 was named the United Nations Year for Tolerance and UNESCO’s General Conference, held in Paris, concentrated on this theme. The delegates voted to establish an annual occasion to carry the message of tolerance into the future, in the form of a day to celebrate books, authors and the laws that protect them. The date was chosen because April 23 marks the anniversary of the birth or death of a range of internationally renowned writers and because of the Catalan traditions surrounding this day. In Catalonia, a region of Spain, April 23 is known as La Diada de Sant Jordi (St George’s Day) and it is traditional for sweethearts to exchange books and roses. World Book and Copyright Day has been held annually since 1995.

Symbols

Each year a poster is designed and distributed around the world. It features images designed to encourage people, particularly children, to read books and appreciate literature. There is also a logo for World Book and Copyright Day. It features a circle, representing the world, and two books, one of which is open.

External Links

United Nations: World Book and Copyright Day

World Book and Copyright Day Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday Type Where It is Observed
Fri Apr 23 2010 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 23 2011 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Mon Apr 23 2012 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 23 2013 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Wed Apr 23 2014 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 23 2015 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Sat Apr 23 2016 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Sun Apr 23 2017 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Mon Apr 23 2018 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Tue Apr 23 2019 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance
Thu Apr 23 2020 World Book and Copyright Day United Nations observance

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SKYWATCH: MAY’S TRANSIT OF MERCURY, DID FERMI SEE MERGING BLACK HOLES’ GAMMA RAYS?, AND MORE

LATEST NEWS

Did Fermi Detect LIGO’s Merging Black Holes

Sky & Telescope

NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope might have detected a burst from the same merging black holes that emitted the gravitational waves LIGO detected. Or not.

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Dark Dwarf Galaxy Discovered

Sky & Telescope

Astronomers using the ALMA array of radio dishes have detected a dwarf galaxy 4 billion light-years away by the pull of its dark matter.

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OBSERVING HIGHLIGHTS

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, April 22 – 30

Sky & Telescope

The waning gibbous Moon joins Saturn and Mars in early morning skies, and Jupiter is high at nightfall.

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Is T CrB About to Blow its Top?

Sky & Telescope

The recurrent nova T Coronae Borealis last made a splash just after World War II. Does its current restive state hint at an imminent outburst?

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Get Ready for May 9th’s Transit of Mercury

Sky & Telescope

It doesn’t happen often, but soon you’ll be able to “spot the spot” – Mercury’s silhouette – as the innermost planet crosses the Sun’s disk. The next transit of Mercury won’t occur until 2019.

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Tour April’s Sky: Morning and Evening Planets

Sky & Telescope

In this month’s guided tour of the night sky, find Mars and Saturn near each other before dawn, while Jupiter and Mercury join the fading constellations of winter in the evening sky after sunset.

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COMMUNITY

Introducing Sky & Telescope‘s Celestial Globe

Sky & Telescope

Our state-of-the-art representation of the entire celestial sphere lets you explore the stars above as never before.

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Join S&T in Iceland, See the Northern Lights

Sky & Telescope

Join Sky & Telescope Observing Editor JR Johnson-Roehr for our fourth annual trip to Iceland to see the northern lights.

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