Monthly Archives: March 2014

INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE RIGHT TO THE TRUTH CONCERNING GROSS HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS AND FOR THE DIGNITY OF VICTIMS: MARCH 24, 2014

 

INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE RIGHT TO THE TRUTH CONCERNING GROSS HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS AND FOR THE DIGNITY OF VICTIMS

Quick Facts

March 24 is the UN’s International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims

Local names

Name Language
International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims English
Día Internacional del Derecho a la Verdad en relación con Violaciones Graves de los Derechos Humanos y de la Dignidad de las Víctimas Spanish
היום בינלאומית לזכות האמת בנוגע להפרת זכויות אדם חמורה ובשל כבוד קורבנות Hebrew
اليوم الدولي للحق في معرفة الحقيقة فيما يتعلق بالانتهاكات ‏الجسيمة لحقوق الإنسان ولاحترام كرامة الضحايا Arabic
총 인권 침해에 관한 진실에 대한 권리에 대한 피해자의 존엄성에 대한 국제 날 Korean
Welttag für das Recht auf Wahrheit bei Verletzungen der Menschenrechte German

International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims 2014

Monday, March 24, 2014

International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims 2015

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

The United Nations (UN) holds a special day to promote a human rights issue on March 24 each year. This day is called the “International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims”.

The UN encourages people to learn about human rights issues, including the right to truth.

©iStockphoto.com/ RichVintage

What do people do

The UN holds various global activities to promote this event. It also encourages governments and people worldwide to observe this international day by:

  • Honoring victims of human rights violations and promote the importance of the right to truth and justice.
  • Paying tribute to those who have devoted their lives to, and lost their lives in, the struggle to promote and protect human rights for all.
  • Recognizing the important work and values of Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, of El Salvador, who was assassinated on March 24, 1980, after denouncing human rights violations and defending the principles of protecting lives, promoting human dignity and opposing violence.

Public life

The International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims is a UN observance and not a public holiday.

Background

In 2006 the UN confirmed that people had the right to know the truth about gross human rights violations and serious violations of human rights law. Furthermore, this right was linked to governments’ duty and obligation to protect and guarantee human rights, to conduct effective investigations and to guarantee effective remedy and reparations.

In December 2010, in a bid to promote human rights, the UN proclaimed March 24 as the “International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims”. The day remembers human rights victims, including Archbishop Romero, who campaigned for human rights for many years and was shot at a church altar in 1980.

International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Mar 24 2011 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Sat Mar 24 2012 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Sun Mar 24 2013 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Mon Mar 24 2014 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Tue Mar 24 2015 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Thu Mar 24 2016 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Fri Mar 24 2017 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Sat Mar 24 2018 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Sun Mar 24 2019 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
Tue Mar 24 2020 International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims United Nations observance
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IN REMEMBRANCE: 3-23-2014

RANDOLPH THROWER, I.R.S. CHIEF WHO RESISTED NIXON

By

MARCH 18, 2014

        

Randolph W. Thrower in 1969.                                 Credit            United Press International                    
Randolph W. Thrower, a Republican lawyer who headed the Internal Revenue Service under President Richard M. Nixon from 1969 to 1971 before losing his job for resisting White House efforts to punish its enemies through tax audits, died March 8 at his home in Atlanta. He was 100.

A daughter, Patricia Barmeyer, confirmed the death.

Mr. Thrower’s unusual legal background — as a federal tax law expert and a lawyer for death row inmates in Georgia, most of them black, in the Jim Crow era — helped garner wide support from lawyers’ groups and lawmakers when Nixon nominated him for I.R.S. commissioner.

And though his tenure was short, he was instrumental in two historic overhauls of American tax policy: revoking the tax-exempt status of private schools that excluded blacks, and passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969, which he helped draft. The legislation eliminated some loopholes for the rich and exempted many poor people from federal taxes altogether.

The end came in January 1971, after Mr. Thrower requested a meeting with the president, hoping to warn him personally about the pressure White House staff members had been placing on the I.R.S. to audit the tax returns of certain individuals. Beginning with antiwar leaders and civil rights figures, the list had grown to include journalists and members of Congress, among them every Democratic senator up for re-election in 1970, Mr. Thrower told investigators years later.

He was certain the president was unaware of this and would agree that “any suggestion of the introduction of political influence into the I.R.S.” could damage his presidency, he said.

Mr. Thrower received two responses. The first was a memo from the president’s appointments secretary saying a meeting would not be possible; the second was a phone call from John D. Ehrlichman, the president’s domestic affairs adviser, telling him he was fired.

He agreed to stay on until a replacement could be found, did not voice his concerns publicly about the administration’s growing appetite for prosecuting its putative enemies, and never disputed the White House explanation for his departure — that he had resigned “for personal reasons.”

In White House tapes and memos released in later years, Nixon described the situation differently. “May I simply reiterate for the record that I wish Randolph Thrower, commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, removed at the earliest feasible opportunity,” he wrote on Jan. 21, 1971, five days before the White House announced that Mr. Thrower was stepping down.

That May, as the administration continued to look for a successor to Mr. Thrower, Nixon made clear what kind of I.R.S. commissioner he wanted. “I want to be sure he is a ruthless son of a bitch,” he was recorded as saying, “that he will do what he is told, that every income tax return I want to see I see” and “that he will go after our enemies and not go after our friends.”

Mr. Thrower, who had long been involved in Republican politics in Atlanta, had not worked in Nixon’s election campaign in 1968. He met Nixon for the first time, he said, when he was appointed I.R.S. commissioner. Seeing Nixon as a shrewd politician who viewed tax overhaul as a winning issue, he took the job, he said, hoping to bring a progressive approach to federal tax policy. But, he added, he “did not like him from the first.”

Randolph William Thrower was born in Tampa, Fla., on Sept. 5, 1913, the youngest of three children of Benjamin Thrower Jr. and Ora Hammond Thrower. His father was working in real estate when he died in 1915. The children were raised by grandparents.

Besides Ms. Barmeyer, Mr. Thrower is survived by three daughters, Margaret MacCary, Laura Harris and Mary Wickham; a son, Randy; 11 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. His wife, Margaret Logan Munroe Thrower, died in 2009.

Mr. Thrower, who received his bachelor’s degree in 1934 and his law degree in 1936 from Emory University in Atlanta, began practicing law in 1937, served in the Marine Corps during World War II and afterward practiced law in Atlanta.

Mr. Thrower encountered several White House operatives while he was I.R.S. commissioner who would later play roles in the Watergate scandal. The one who alarmed him the most, he told interviewers, was G. Gordon Liddy, the former F.B.I. agent who helped plan the break-in of the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate complex in 1972. Mr. Liddy was sent to him in 1970 as the White House candidate to head the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, then a branch of the I.R.S.

“He was a gun nut,” Mr. Thrower said. “They wanted me to put a gun nut in charge of guns.” Mr. Liddy did not get the job.

But it was not Watergate that haunted Mr. Thrower; it was the case of Will Coxson, a black teenager convicted in the late 1930s of raping a white woman in Marietta, Ga., and sentenced to die. Mr. Thrower took the case on appeal in 1940 and discovered that Mr. Coxson’s alibi was solid and that the victim’s initial description of her attacker as “a light-skinned black man” had changed significantly when the prosecution brought the case to trial. Mr. Coxson was dark-skinned.

The Georgia Supreme Court ordered a hearing on whether Mr. Coxson had received adequate representation, and Mr. Thrower was preparing for that when he left to join the Marines. Turning the case over to another lawyer, he said, he felt sure that the evidence would sustain an appeal all the way to the United States Supreme Court if necessary and win Mr. Coxson’s freedom. But the case “withered on the vine,” he said, and while Mr. Thrower was serving in the Pacific, Mr. Coxson was executed.

“For the past 60 years, no case has kept me awake at night as much as this,” he said in a 2001 lecture, “wondering what else I might have done to save the life of this young man. His life should not have been taken.”

SOURCE

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FRED PHELPS, ANTI-GAY PREACHER WHO TARGETED MILITARY FUNERALS

By

MARCH 20, 2014

        

Fred Phelps, who led the Westboro Baptist Church, in 2006.                                 Credit            Charlie Riedel/Associated Press                    
TOPEKA, Kan. — The Rev. Fred Phelps, the virulently antigay preacher who drew wide, scornful attention for staging demonstrations at military funerals as a way to proclaim his belief that God is punishing America for its tolerance of homosexuality, died here on Wednesday. He was 84.

The Westboro Baptist Church confirmed the death, declaring on one of its websites, “Fred W. Phelps Sr. has gone the way of all flesh.” The church did not give a cause of death, but Mr. Phelps had been living under hospice care.

Mr. Phelps, who founded and led Westboro Baptist, a small, independent church in Topeka, was a much-loathed figure at the fringe of the American religious scene, denounced across the theological and political spectrum for his beliefs, his language and his tactics.

His congregation, which claims to have staged tens of thousands of demonstrations, is made up almost entirely of his family members, many of whom lived together in a small Topeka compound, although in recent years some of his children and grandchildren had broken with the group.

The Rev. Fred Phelps in 2006.                                 Credit            Charlie Riedel/Associated Press                    

A disbarred civil rights lawyer who had once been honored by the N.A.A.C.P. and who ran for office repeatedly, and unsuccessfully, as a Democrat, Mr. Phelps seemed to accept the criticism if not relish it.

“If I had nobody mad at me,” he told The Wichita Eagle in 2006, “what right would I have to claim that I was preaching the Gospel?”

He believed that the United States was beyond saving, and he devoted his life to traveling with a small band of protesters to highlight what he saw as America’s sinfulness and damnation.

“The way to prove you love thy neighbor is to warn them they’re committing sin,” he told the central Pennsylvania newspaper The Patriot-News in 2004. “You’re not going to get nowhere with that slop that ‘God loves you,’ ” he added. “That’s a diabolical lie from hell without biblical warrant.”

His church’s website maintains a running tally of “people whom God has cast into hell since you loaded this page.”

He was highly litigious and employed crude language to call attention to his cause. (The slogan “God Hates Fags” appeared on the church’s picket signs and remains in its web address.) He sued President Ronald Reagan for establishing diplomatic relations with the Vatican; denounced the Rev. Jerry Falwell, who called Mr. Phelps a “first-class nut”; and picketed the funerals of Al Gore’s father and Bill Clinton’s mother.

Mr. Phelps’s picketing began in 1991 as an outgrowth of his dissatisfaction with Topeka’s response to his complaint that gay men were using a park near his home for “indecent conduct.” His antigay effort at the park was followed by protests of funerals of people who had died of AIDS, and then multiple local churches that he criticized as tolerant of homosexuality.

In 1998, he explained his view of a wrathful God in an interview with The Houston Chronicle.

“You can’t believe the Bible without believing that God hates people,” he said. “It’s pure nonsense to say that God loves the sinner but hates the sin. He hates the sin, and he hates the sinner. He sends them to hell. Do you think he loves the people in hell?”

Later that year, he attracted global attention and condemnation when he picketed the funeral of Matthew Shepard, the gay Wyoming college student whose beating death led to a national debate over hate crimes.

Mr. Phelps, with his wife, Margie M. Phelps, left, and daughter Margie J. Phelps, at a demonstration in Baltimore in 2007.                                 Credit            Jed Kirschbaum/Baltimore Sun, via Associated Press                    

It was his church’s protests of military funerals, which began in about 2005, that provoked the most widespread anger, prompting legislative bodies to establish buffer zones to limit such protests at funerals. In 2011, Mr. Phelps won a major legal victory when the Supreme Court ruled, 8 to 1, that his church’s protests were a protected form of speech. The ruling preserved the buffer zones but found that the father of a slain soldier was not entitled to damages for emotional distress caused by a protest.

“This is somebody who was addicted to rage and anger,” K. Ryan Jones, a filmmaker who made a documentary about Mr. Phelps, said in an interview. “Early on in his legal career he would manifest that rage against the people he was prosecuting, or some would say persecuting, and then when he was disbarred that rage transitioned into the ministry.”

Fred Waldron Phelps was born on Nov. 13, 1929, in Meridian, Miss. He said that he had been admitted to the United States Military Academy at West Point but that after high school he had what his official biography called “a profound religious experience” and decided instead to devote himself to evangelism. In 1951, when he was just 21, he was profiled in Time magazine after his denunciations of “promiscuous petting” and “teachers’ filthy jokes in classrooms” at John Muir College in Pasadena, Calif., where he was a student, had brought him into conflict with the administration.

He married Margie Marie Simms in 1952, and in 1954 the couple moved to Topeka. They had 13 children, 54 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren, according to the church’s website. Mr. Phelps established Westboro Baptist in 1955.

He earned a law degree in 1964 from Washburn University School of Law in Topeka, but his legal career was troubled from the start. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which describes Westboro Baptist as “arguably the most obnoxious and rabid hate group in America,” Mr. Phelps struggled to find people to attest to his good character when he wanted to be admitted to the bar, was temporarily suspended for professional misconduct, and was even sued for failing to pay for candy his children sold door to door.

He succeeded in winning settlements in discrimination cases he filed as a civil rights lawyer.

“Most blacks — that’s who they went to,” the Rev. Ben Scott, president of the N.A.A.C.P.’s Topeka branch, said in an interview with CNN in 2010. “I don’t know if he was cheaper or if he had that stick-to-it-ness, but Fred didn’t lose many back then.”

Mr. Phelps was disbarred in Kansas in 1979 for professional misconduct in connection with a lawsuit he brought against a court clerk who he said had failed to have a transcript ready in time. In 1989, after being accused of misconduct by nine federal judges, he agreed to stop practicing law in the federal courts as well.

His focus on protests since 1991 was relentless: His church claimed to hold multiple events a day while issuing news releases using coarse and inflammatory language, some of which celebrated the deaths of American soldiers, saying they were God’s way of punishing America for enabling homosexuality.

This week, an estranged son of Mr. Phelps said his father had been excommunicated from his own church. The church did not respond to that assertion. Answering inquiries about Mr. Phelps’s health, however, the church summed up its message, saying: “God still hates fags, God still hates fag enablers and any nation that embraces that sin as an ‘innocent’ lifestyle can expect to incur the wrath of God. Repent or Perish.”

Westboro Baptist has said that it does not plan to hold a public funeral for Mr. Phelps, and the Kansas Equality Coalition, a gay rights group, has urged people not to celebrate his death. When asked in 2006 how he would feel if his own funeral were protested, Mr. Phelps said: “I’d welcome it. I’d invite them.”

Correction: March 20, 2014 An earlier version of this obituary, using information from The Associated Press, gave an incorrect date for the Rev. Fred Phelps’s death. It was late Wednesday, not early Thursday.SOURCE******************************************************

SAM LACEY, TOP CENTER IN N.B.A. AND THE 1970 FINAL FOUR

By

MARCH 18, 2014

        

Sam Lacey, right, playing for the Cincinnati Royals in 1971. He was known as a rugged rebounder and shot blocker.                                 Credit            Associated Press                    
  • Sam Lacey, a leading N.B.A. center of the 1970s who could do just about anything on the court but was often overlooked, playing for mostly lackluster teams, died on Friday at his home in Kansas City, Mo. He was 66.

His daughter Gretchen Downey said the cause had not yet been determined.

Spending most of his 13 National Basketball Association seasons with the Cincinnati Royals and the Kansas City Kings, the Royals’ successor franchise, Lacey was a rugged rebounder, at 6 feet 10 inches and 235 pounds, and an outstanding shot blocker. He also hit timely baskets and was a fine playmaker.

Seeking to rebuild after trading Oscar Robertson to the Milwaukee Bucks, the Royals selected Lacey in the first round of the 1970 N.B.A. draft after he led New Mexico State University to the N.C.A.A. tournament’s Final Four.

Lacey teamed with guard Nate Archibald, his fellow rookie and a future N.B.A. scoring champion, to provide some spark for a losing Royals team.

Perhaps his biggest game as a rookie came at Madison Square Garden, when he blocked three shots by the Knicks’ star center, Willis Reed.

Lacey averaged in double figures in points and rebounds in his first six professional seasons, and he averaged 5.3 assists in 1974-75, when he was an All-Star. But his teams never made it past the Western Conference finals, which the Kings reached in 1981 after posting a 40-42 regular-season record.

“Once we got into the playoffs, there were no expectations,” Lacey told The Kansas City Star in 2002. “We just played together, played team ball.”

Lacey’s teammates that season included guards Otis Birdsong and Phil Ford and forward Scott Wedman, who told The Star that Lacey “was the team captain during our best run, so that says a lot about him as a leader and teammate.”

Samuel Lacey Jr. was born on March 8, 1948, in Indianola, Miss. He was recruited for New Mexico State by Ed Murphy, an assistant to the head coach, Lou Henson.

“Sam was a really shy kid when he first came to New Mexico State,” Murphy told the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. “I don’t know that he had ever been out of the Mississippi Delta.”

Lacey averaged nearly 18 points and 16 rebounds as a senior for the Aggies, leading them to the only Final Four appearance in their history, a 1970 matchup with U.C.L.A. He injured an ankle early and scored only 8 points as the Bruins, led by Henry Bibby, Curtis Rowe, John Vallely and Sidney Wicks, defeated the Aggies, 93-77, and went on to win the championship.

Lacey averaged 10.3 points and 9.7 rebounds in his N.B.A. career, which concluded with a season apiece for the New Jersey Nets and the Cleveland Cavaliers.

In addition to his daughter Gretchen, he is survived by two other daughters, Alires Almon and Barri Davis-Richardson; a brother, Ike; and four grandchildren.

The Sacramento Kings, whose roots go back to the Rochester Royals and the teams that played in Cincinnati, Omaha and then Kansas City, have paid tribute to Lacey.

His No. 44 is displayed aloft at the Sacramento arena along with the numbers worn by stars like Robertson, Archibald, Maurice Stokes, Jack Twyman and Bob Davies, figures from the Kings’ basketball family tree.

SOURCE

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WORLD METEOROLOGICAL DAY [WMO]: MARCH 23, 2014

WORLD METEOROLOGICAL DAY

Quick Facts

World Meteorological Day marks the anniversary of the World Meteorological Organization’s establishment on March 23, 1950.

Local names

Name Language
World Meteorological Day English
Día Mundial de la Meteorología Spanish
יום המטאורולוגיה העולמי Hebrew
اليوم العالمي للرصد الجوي Arabic
세계 기상의 날 Korean
Welttag der Meteorologie German

World Meteorological Day 2014

Sunday, March 23, 2014

World Meteorological Day 2015

Monday, March 23, 2015

The United Nations’ (UN) World Meteorological Day is annually held on or around March 23 to remember the World Meteorological Organization’s establishment on that date in 1950. Many different activities and events are organized for this occasion.

Weather equipmentWeather stations help pass information about weather forecasts and temperatures.

©iStockphoto.com/Saso Novoselic

What do people do?

World Meteorological Day often features various events such as conferences, symposia and exhibitions for meteorological professionals, community leaders and the general public. Some events aim to attract media attention to raise meteorology’s profile.

Many prizes for meteorological research are presented or announced on or close to World Meteorological Day. These prizes include:

  • The International Meteorological Organization Prize.
  • Professor Dr. Vilho Väisälä Award.
  • The Norbert Gerbier-Mumm International Award.

Many countries issue postage stamps or special postage stamp cancellation marks to celebrate World Meteorological Day. These stamps often reflect the event’s theme or mark a country’s meteorology achievements.

Public life

World Meteorological Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

The International Meteorological Organization was established at the first International Meteorological Congress in Vienna, Austria, in 1873. The organization aimed to establish meteorological station networks. These networks were linked by telegraph and improved weather forecasts. This contributed to shipping services’ safety and efficiency.

The International Meteorological Organization became the World Meteorological Organization on March 23, 1950. It became the UN’s specialized agency for meteorology, operational hydrology and related geophysical sciences in 1951.

The World Meteorological Organization plays a crucial role in contributing to people’s safety and welfare. Its work is important in providing food security, water resources and transport. World Meteorological Day has been observed on March 23 each year since 1961.

Themes

Recent themes of World Meteorological Day have been:

  • Weather, climate and the air we breathe (2009).
  • Observing our planet for a better future (2008).
  • Polar meteorology: Understanding global impacts (2007).
  • Preventing and mitigating natural disasters (2006).
  • Weather, climate, water and sustainable development (2005).
  • Weather, climate, water in the information age (2004).
  • Our future climate (2003).

A new theme is allocated to each different year for World Meteorological Day.

World Meteorological Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Fri Mar 23 1990 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 23 1991 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 23 1992 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 23 1993 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 23 1994 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 23 1995 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 23 1996 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 23 1997 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 23 1998 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 23 1999 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 23 2000 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 23 2001 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 23 2002 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 23 2003 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 23 2004 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 23 2005 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 23 2006 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 23 2007 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 23 2008 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 23 2009 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 23 2010 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 23 2011 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 23 2012 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 23 2013 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 23 2014 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 23 2015 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 23 2016 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 23 2017 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 23 2018 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 23 2019 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 23 2020 World Meteorological Day United Nations observance

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CARTOON OF THE DAY: A HINT FROM PUTIN

PUTIN GIVES THE FINGER TO EU

Olle Johansson is Sweden’s leading political cartoonist (known there as Tecknar-Olle). His freelance cartoons appear in the daily paper Norra Västerbotten and other papers throughout Sweeden and abroad.

 

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WORLD WATER DAY: MARCH 22, 2014

WORLD WATER DAY

Quick Facts

World Water Day aims to increase people’s awareness of the water’s importance in all aspects of life.

Local names

Name Language
World Water Day English
Día Mundial del Agua Spanish
יום המים הבינלאומי Hebrew
يوم الماء العالمي Arabic
세계 물의 날 Korean
Weltwassertag German

World Water Day 2014

Saturday, March 22, 2014

World Water Day 2015

Sunday, March 22, 2015

The United Nations’ (UN) World Water Day is held on March 22 each year. Events are organized on or around this day to increase people’s awareness of water’s importance in environment, agriculture, health and trade.

World Water Day aims to increase people’s awareness on water’s importance in life.©iStockphoto.com/DeepAqua

What do people do?

Many events are held worldwide during World Water Day. These include:

  • Visual art, theatrical and musical celebrations of water.
  • Symposia for local, national and international leaders on water management and security.
  • Educational events on the importance of clean water and protecting water resources.
  • Campaigns and events to raise money for access to clean and affordable water.
  • Excursions to local rivers, lakes and reservoirs.
  • Special broadcasts on television and radio and the Internet.
  • Walks, runs and swimming other sports competitions.

Some events are held on actual World Water Day date, while others are held on convenient dates close to March 22.

Public life

World Water Day is not a public holiday in countries such as Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Background

Agenda 21 is a worldwide action plan for areas where human activities may affect the environment. It was adopted at the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in June 1992. Agenda 21 recommended various measures, including creating World Water Day.

The UN General Assembly adopted a resolution on December 22, 1992, declaring March 22 to be the World Day for Water each year. Countries were encouraged to develop activities to highlight local needs for water. The first World Day for Water was observed in 1993.

The Water for Life Decade was launched on World Water Day in 2005. This decade will run from 2005 to 2015 and give a high profile to women’s participation and the UN’s water-related programs.

Symbols

World Water Day’s main symbol is the shape of a water drop in the UN’s color blue. Photographs of water being used or in rivers, reservoirs, lakes or seas are widely displayed on this occasion.

World Water Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Mon Mar 22 1993 World Water Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 22 1994 World Water Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 22 1995 World Water Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 22 1996 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 22 1997 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 22 1998 World Water Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 22 1999 World Water Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 22 2000 World Water Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 22 2001 World Water Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 22 2002 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 22 2003 World Water Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 22 2004 World Water Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 22 2005 World Water Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 22 2006 World Water Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 22 2007 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 22 2008 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 22 2009 World Water Day United Nations observance
Mon Mar 22 2010 World Water Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 22 2011 World Water Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 22 2012 World Water Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 22 2013 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sat Mar 22 2014 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 22 2015 World Water Day United Nations observance
Tue Mar 22 2016 World Water Day United Nations observance
Wed Mar 22 2017 World Water Day United Nations observance
Thu Mar 22 2018 World Water Day United Nations observance
Fri Mar 22 2019 World Water Day United Nations observance
Sun Mar 22 2020 World Water Day United Nations observance

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SKYWATCH: HISTORY-MAKING DISCOVERY OF BIG BANG, INTERACTIVE MOON MAP, AND MORE

News
B-mode discovery telescope

Steffen Richter / BICEP Collaboration

First Direct Evidence of Big Bang Inflation

March 17, 2014                                                                | Researchers with an experiment based at the South Pole have discovered the long-sought “smoking gun” for inflation. The signal was hidden in polarization patterns in the cosmic microwave background and confirms physicists’ audacious theory of how the Big Bang happened. > read more

 

The Incredible, Shrinking Mercury

March 19, 2014                                                                | Now that they’ve seen all of the innermost planet up close, geologists realize that Mercury’s crust buckled and fractured as the planet cooled and shrank far more than previously measured. > read more

 

First Interactive Mosaic of the Lunar North Pole

March 21, 2014                                                                | With the first interactive lunar north pole mosaic released by the NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera team you can explore an area of the Moon’s northern hemisphere about the size of Alaska and Texas combined. > read more

 

Young Stars Lead the Magellanic Stream

March 19, 2014                                                                | Astronomers have discovered hot, young stars in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic Stream, calling the history of the Magellanic Clouds once again into question. > read more

 

Observing

Zodiacal light

ESO / Y. Beletsky

Zodiacal Light in the Evening

March 12, 2014                                                                | The zodiacal light is on its best display in the Northern Hemisphere on moonless evenings from February through April. > read more

 

Tour March’s Sky by Eye and Ear!

February 28, 2014                                                                  | A stunning array awaits you overhead once the Sun sets. Brilliant Sirius, along with Procyon, Betelgeuse, and even-brighter Jupiter, form a giant diamond in the evening sky. > read more

 

This Week’s Sky at a Glance

This Week’s Sky at a Glance

March 21, 2014                                                                  | The Moon is waning away into the morning sky, leaving the evening dark for deep-sky observing. And can you catch the double shadow transit on Jupiter? > read more

 

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HATEWATCH: ‘WHITE MAN’S MARCH’ EVENTS DRAWS SMATTERING OF PARTICIPANTS, LOADS OF DERISION

‘White Man’s March’ Events Draw Smattering of Participants, Loads of Derision

By David Neiwert on March 17, 2014 – 11:26 am

Kyle Hunt had grand visions of thousands of white men coming out of the woodwork this weekend to stand up and defend their interests in a public march that would grab the nation’s attention. Like a lot of such plans, things didn’t exactly work out that way.

Hunt, a 30-year-old former Google employee currently living in Massachusetts, promoted the “White Man’s March” this past weekend through a variety of white supremacist outlets, including his own outfit, Renegade Broadcasting, an Internet radio station devoted to covering “the destruction of the white race.” The plan was to hold the main event in New York City, with satellite marches occurring in various other cities around the country.

The marches, Hunt claimed, were a response to fears that white people are being “mocked, displaced and violently attacked” through an insidious liberal idea known as “diversity.”

Skinheads Richard Kidd and Jarred Hensley with unidentified Klansman in Florence, Ky.

Skinheads Richard Kidd and Jarred Hensley with unidentified Klansman in Florence, Ky.

But no one seems to have actually marched in the “#whitemanmarch.” It was more of a series of brief banner displays and Twitter photo postings of racist flyers and stickers affixed to various objects around the country. The banners were large red-and-white affairs reading “Diversity = White Genocide”.

Hunt argues that the “‘diversity’ agenda is being directed at white countries (and only at white countries) with various programs to ensure that there are less white people at schools and in the work force, which is unfair and discriminatory.” It is “taking away money and opportunities from the White citizens,” he says.

The New York event ran into trouble when it emerged that Hunt was attempting to tie his Saturday “march” with the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York, scheduled for the same weekend. His plans were roundly denounced by angry Irish Americans and parade organizers.

Hunt told the press beforehand that he expected “thousands” to participate. On Saturday, only a smattering of attendees showed up in New York. There were similarly tiny gatherings in Florence, Ky., Tempe, Ariz. and Birmingham, Ala., where police took down the “Diversity” banners. Demonstrators also showed up in Branson, Mo. and Olympia, Wash.

As much as anything, the march was the subject of open mockery, especially on social media and the Internet. On Twitter, people flooded in with derisive tweets, some of which were so hilarious they were collected at Salon.com, City Guide and elsewhere.

Reactions from white supremacists to the low turnout and poor press coverage was mixed. Robert Whitaker, of “mantra” fame, complained that his “white genocide” message had been inappropriately commandeered and that the event was not inclusive of women. “The White MAN’s March was a hijack. White people come in two sexes,” he wrote Sunday.  Whitaker also chided the concept of taking to the streets as something “out of the 30′s.”

Other racists were critical of the Klansmen who showed up to participate at a protest in Florence, Kentucky, organized by former National Alliance leader, Robert Ransdell, particularly since this was one of the few gatherings that generated media coverage.   Skinheads Richard Kidd and Jarred Hensley also attended.

Ransdell defended the Klan’s presence and stated his protest was “really a sight to behold, White people in large numbers not even being scared away.”

Counting Ransdell, the “large numbers” at his Kentucky event added up to nine, which seems to have been one of the largest White Man’s March gatherings anywhere. The presence of two notorious skinheads and two Klansmen didn’t stop Ransdell from taking a victory lap on the racist forums Sunday.

Meanwhile, Hunt is pursuing his next grand vision. He warned one interviewer that he may well be the President of the USA by 2020.

SOURCE

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