Monthly Archives: December 2013

INTERNATIONAL MIGRANTS DAY: DECEMBER 18, 2013

 

INTERNATIONAL MIGRANTS DAY

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Migrants Day is celebrated on December 18 each year.

Local names

Name Language
International Migrants Day English
Día Internacional del Migrante Spanish
יום המהגרים בינלאומי Hebrew
اليوم الدولي للمهاجرين Arabic
국제 이민자의 날 Korean
Internationaler Tag der Migranten German

International Migrants Day 2013

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

International Migrants Day 2014

Thursday, December 18, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) International Migrants Day is annually held on December 18 to recognize the efforts, contributions and rights of migrants worldwide.

Muslim child and mother expressing joy.International Migrants Day recognizes the efforts, contributions and rights of migrants worldwide.

©iStockphoto.com/DistinctiveImages

What do people do?

Each year the UN invites governments, organizations, and individuals to observe International Migrants Day by distributing information on the human rights and migrants’ fundamental freedoms. People are also invited to share their experiences and contribute to designing action plans to ensure their protection. Organizations actively involved in promoting the day include:

  • “December 18”, a non-governmental organization in special consultative status with the UN.
  • Radio 1812, an initiative that brings together radio stations to celebrate the day.
  • Amnesty International.
  • The International Organization for Migration.
  • The National Network for Immigrants and Refugee Rights.

Many organizations and communities celebrate the day through various activities to alert the general public on facts about migrants, problems with human trafficking, the lives of migrant workers’ children, the plight of refugees and ways in combating racism. Websites, such as http://www.britkid.org, gives people the opportunity to have a virtual experience of what it is like to come from a migrant background. Lobby groups may also use this day as an opportunity to pressure local public officials to look at issues concerning legalization, immigrant enforcement and migrants’ human rights. Special films and documentaries about migrants are also screened or broadcast on this day.

Public life

International Migrants Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

According to a Global Commission on International Migration report in 2005, the number of international migrants increased from 75 million to about 200 million in the past 30 years and migrants could be found in every part of the world. The report also found that the migration could accelerate due to the growing developmental, demographic and democratic disparities that existed between different world regions. Moreover, migration is driven by powerful economic, social and political forces that governments need to acknowledge as a reality.

On December 4, 2000, the UN General Assembly, taking into account the large and increasing number of migrants in the world, proclaimed December 18 as International Migrants. On that day, a decade earlier, the assembly adopted the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families. Earlier celebrations of the day can be traced as far back as 1997 when some Asian migrant organizations marked December 18 as the day to recognize the rights, protection, and respect for migrants.

Symbols

The UN emblem may be found in material promoting International Migrants Day. The emblem consists of a projection of the globe centered on the North Pole. It depicts all continents except Antarctica and four concentric circles representing degrees of latitude. The projection is surrounded by images of olive branches, representing peace. The emblem is often blue, although it is printed in white on a blue background on the UN flag.

International Migrants Day Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Mon Dec 18 2000 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 18 2001 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 18 2002 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 18 2003 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 18 2004 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 18 2005 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 18 2006 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 18 2007 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 18 2008 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 18 2009 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 18 2010 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 18 2011 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 18 2012 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 18 2013 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 18 2014 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 18 2015 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 18 2016 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 18 2017 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 18 2018 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 18 2019 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 18 2020 International Migrants Day United Nations observance
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IN REMEMBRANCE: 12-15-2013

PETER O’TOOLE, STAR OF ‘LAWRENCE OF ARABIA’

  • Columbia Pictures/Photofest
  • Adam Larkey/ABC
  • Avco Embassy Pictures, via Associated Press
  • Everett Collection
  • Ken Danvers/Columbia Pictures
  • MGM/United Artists Entertainment
  • Derek Speirs for The New York Times
Peter O’Toole with Omar Sharif in the film “Lawrence of Arabia.”
Arriving at the Academy Awards ceremony in 2007.
As King Henry II in “The Lion in Winter,” with Katharine Hepburn.
As the crazed 14th Earl of Gurney in “The Ruling Class.”
Playing the title role in the 1965 film “Lord Jim.”
As Alan Swann in “My Favorite Year,” with Mark Linn-Baker.
As Pope Paul III in the television series “The Tudors.”

By  BENEDICT NIGHTINGALE

Published: December 15, 2013

  • Peter O’Toole, an Irish bookmaker’s son with a hell-raising streak whose performance in the 1962 epic film “Lawrence of Arabia” earned him overnight fame and established him as one of his generation’s most charismatic actors, died on Saturday in London. He was 81.

His daughter Kate O’Toole said in a statement that he had been ill for some time.

Blond, blue-eyed and well over six feet tall, Mr. O’Toole had the dashing good looks and high spirits befitting a leading man — and he did not disappoint in “Lawrence,” David Lean’s wide-screen, almost-four-hour homage to T. E. Lawrence, the daring British soldier and adventurer who led an Arab rebellion against the Turks in the Middle East in World War I.

The performance brought Mr. O’Toole the first of eight Academy Award nominations, a flood of film offers and a string of artistic successes in the ’60s and early ’70s. In the theater — he was a classically trained actor — he played an anguished, angular tramp in Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” and a memorably battered title character in Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanya.” In film, he twice played a robust King Henry II: first opposite Richard Burton in “Becket” (1964), then with Katharine Hepburn as his queen in “The Lion in Winter” (1968). Both earned Oscar nominations for best actor, as did his repressed, decaying schoolmaster in “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” in 1970 and the crazed 14th Earl of Gurney in “The Ruling Class” in 1973.

Less successful was his Don Quixote in “Man of La Mancha,” Arthur Hiller’s 1972 adaptation of the Broadway musical, but it emphasized that his specialty was increasingly becoming the outsider or misfit: dreamy, romantic, turbulent, damaged, or even mad, but usually larger than life.

Mr. O’Toole threw himself wholeheartedly into what he called “bravura acting,” courting and sometimes deserving the accusation that he became over-theatrical, mannered, even hammy. His lanky, loose-jointed build; his eyes; his long, lantern-jawed face; his oddly languorous sexual charm; and the eccentric loops and whoops of his voice tended to reinforce the impression of power and extravagance.

Burton called him “the most original actor to come out of Britain since the war,” with “something odd, mystical and deeply disturbing” in his work.

Some critics called him the next Laurence Olivier. As a young actor, Mr. O’Toole displayed an authority that the critic Kenneth Tynan said “may presage greatness.” In 1958, the director Peter Hall called Mr. O’Toole’s Hamlet in a London production “electrifying” and “unendurably exciting” — a display of “animal magnetism and danger which proclaimed the real thing.”

He showed those strengths somewhat erratically, however; for all his accolades and his box-office success, there was a lingering note of unfulfilled promise in Mr. O’Toole.

It was no surprise when Olivier chose Mr. O’Toole to inaugurate Britain’s National Theater Company in 1963 with a reprise of his Hamlet. But the first night left most critics unmoved and unexcited and the actor himself lamenting “the most humbling, humiliating experience of my life.”

“As it went on,” he said, “I suddenly knew it wasn’t going to be any good.”

A production in 1965 of David Mercer’s “Ride a Cock Horse,” in which he played an adulterous alcoholic, was booed at its London opening.

In the movies, he continued to be a marquee name, though he drew only mixed reviews for a subsequent run of performances: as the cowardly naval officer seeking redemption in “Lord Jim,” Richard Brooks’s 1965 adaptation of the Joseph Conrad novel; as a playboy in “What’s New, Pussycat?,” a 1965 comedy with Peter Sellers that was written by a young Woody Allen; and as the Three Angels in “The Bible: In the Beginning,” John Huston’s 1966 recreation of Genesis. And his sadistic Nazi general in Anatole Litvak’s “Night of the Generals” (1967) was panned outright.

His carousing became legend, particularly in the 1970s. As he himself said, he had long been “happy to grasp the hand of misfortune, dissipation, riotous living and violence,” counting Burton, Richard Harris, Robert Shaw, Francis Bacon, Trevor Howard, Laurence Harvey and Peter Finch among his drinking companions. He lost much of his “Lawrence” earnings in two nights with Omar Sharif at casinos in Beirut and Casablanca.

At Odds With Hollywood

Though he won many lesser awards during his career, triumph at the Academy Awards eluded him, perhaps in part because he had made no secret of his dislike of Hollywood and naturalistic acting, which he considered drab. He was nothing if not ambitious, but success would come on his own terms, not the movie industry’s. He had made that plain at 18, when an acting career was already in his mind. In his notebook he made a promise to himself: “I will not be a common man. I will stir the smooth sands of monotony. I do not crave security. I wish to hazard my soul to opportunity.”

Peter Seamus (some sources say Seamus Peter) O’Toole was born on Aug. 2, 1932, in the Connemara region of the West of Ireland, the son of Constance, a Scotswoman who had been a nurse, and Patrick, an itinerant Irish bookmaker whose dandified dress and manner earned him the nicknames Spats and Captain Pat.

Mr. O’Toole liked to tell interviewers that his background was “not working class but criminal class.” The father was left with a bad right hand after all its knuckles were systematically broken, presumably by creditors.

When Peter was a baby, the family moved to England and settled in a tiny house on a black-cobbled street in an impoverished section of industrial Leeds with a “reek of slag and soot and waste,” as he described it in an autobiography.

Peter was an altar boy at the local Roman Catholic church and displayed a gift for creative writing, but he left school at 13 and became a warehouseman, a messenger, a copy boy, a photographer’s assistant and, eventually, a reporter for The Yorkshire Evening News. A poor journalist by his own admission, he was fired by the editor with the words, “Try something else, be an actor, do anything.”

It was a constructive nudge. (He had already tried his hand at amateur dramatics.) After an obscure debut as a rum-swigging seafarer in a melodrama called “Aloma of the South Seas,” Leeds’s well-regarded Civic Theater cast him in the lead role of Bazarov in an adaptation of Turgenev’s “Fathers and Sons.”

Though military service intervened, his aspirations came to fruition quickly. At 20 and almost penniless, he went to Stratford to see Michael Redgrave as King Lear.

By his own account, he spent the night in a field filled with hay and manure, hitchhiked to London and ventured into the lobby of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. There he chanced to fall into conversation with the principal, Sir Kenneth Barnes, who encouraged him to apply for an audition. He did, and received a full scholarship. Albert Finney, Alan Bates and Brian Bedford were among his fellow students.

After graduating in 1955 he was invited to join one of Britain’s premier repertory companies, the Bristol Old Vic. He performed with the troupe for three and a half years, and it was there that his Hamlet so impressed Mr. Hall. It brought Mr. O’Toole, at 27, national attention, and Mr. Hall induced him to join his newly founded Royal Shakespeare Company. In Stratford his Petruchio in “The Taming of the Shrew” and Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice” won critical acclaim and the admiration of Mr. Lean, who was casting his screen biography of Lawrence.

An Epic T. E. Lawrence

At six feet two, Mr. O’Toole was not an obvious choice for the role of a five-foot-four scholar-soldier, and the producer, Sam Spiegel, had found him bumptious in a meeting. But after Marlon Brando turned down the role, Lean lobbied for Mr. O’Toole and won the day.

His casting led to a mesmeric yet meticulous performance that brought world renown and an Oscar nomination to an actor whose only notable screen appearance to date had been as a priggish young officer in “The Day They Robbed the Bank of England” in 1960.

Whatever his later reputation as a roisterer, Mr. O’Toole was conscientious when it came to preparing for a role. In the two-odd years it took to shoot “Lawrence,” he read all he could about the man, studied Bedouin culture, lived in a Bedouin tent, taught himself the essentials of Arabic and learned to ride a camel. His acting method, he wrote in his autobiography, was a process that blended “magic” with “sweat,” a matter of allowing a text to flow into his mind and body until he fully inhabited the character — “that simple, that difficult.”

Mr. O’Toole admitted to being “a very physical actor.”

“I use everything — toes, teeth, ears, everything,” he said.After his triumphs of the 1960s and early ’70s, he entered his most troubled period. His earlier binges had led to arrests for unruly behavior; now they caused memory loss and debilitating hangovers. In 1975, he developed pancreatitis and had part of his intestines removed.

Then his much-loved father died, and Sian Phillips, whom Mr. O’Toole had married in 1959, left him for another man, explaining later that her relationship with an egoistic star had become too tempestuous and “too unequal.” Divorce followed in 1979.

Though Mr. O’Toole said he essentially gave up alcohol in 1975, his career continued to sputter. The universally panned 1979 film “Caligula,” in which he played the Emperor Tiberius, was followed in 1980 by one of the most derided theatrical performances of modern times: a Macbeth who attempted to exit through a wall of the rather dark set at the Old Vic on the first night and, according to The Guardian, delivered every line “in a monotonous tenor bark as if addressing an audience of deaf Eskimos.”

Yet there was evidence of recovery, too. The ABC mini-series “Masada,” with Mr. O’Toole as a Roman general resisting freedom fighters in Judea, brought him an Emmy nomination in 1981. He also impressed with a galvanically garrulous Jack Tanner in Shaw’s “Man and Superman” in the West End in 1982.

The flamboyant charm of the autocratic movie director he played in the film “The Stunt Man” brought him a sixth Oscar nomination in 1981, and his playing of Alan Swann, the swashbuckling, Errol Flynn-like thespian of “My Favorite Year,” a seventh in 1983.

The 1980s also brought him unwanted publicity in the form of a long court battle with his second wife, Karen Brown, an American actress with whom he had a son, Lorcan, in 1983. The eventual judgment allowed Mr. O’Toole, already the father of two daughters by Ms. Phillips, to look after the boy while he went to school in England and his mother to have custody during vacations.

A Career’s Ebbs and Flows

Partly as a result, Mr. O’Toole’s professional engagements became fewer. In 1987 his restrained performance as the court tutor in Bernardo Bertolucci’s “Last Emperor” was widely called the strongest in a strong movie. But onstage his Professor Higgins in Shaw’s “Pygmalion” proved more controversial. In 1984, many London critics were admiring; The Observer described him in the role as “monstrous, eccentric, secretive, arrogant, asexual, childlike, cross and vain”; but in 1987, the New York critics were less impressed, and he was not nominated for a Tony Award.

Mr. O’Toole once wryly admitted that he continued to accept roles in inferior films, like “King Ralph,” because “it’s what I do for a living and, besides, I’ve got bookies to keep.” But in the 1990s he displayed his old strengths again and even discovered fresh ones.

He gave a hilarious performance as the erratic Lord Emsworth in a television adaptation of P. G. Wodehouse’s “Heavy Weather” in 1996 and a touching one as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the film “Fairytale — A True Story” in 1997. Most striking was his humorous yet poignant playing of an old Soho drinking buddy in Keith Waterhouse’s biographical play, “Jeffrey Bernard Is Unwell,” in 1989, ’91 and ’99. He also reprised the role in a 1999 television movie.

In 2003, he played President Paul von Hindenburg of Germany in the CBS-TV mini-series “Hitler: The Rise of Evil,” and in 2004 he was Priam, father of the doomed Hector, in Wolfgang Petersen’s screen epic “Troy.”

“I’m a professional,” he said in one interview, “and I’ll do anything — a poetry reading, television, cinema, anything that allows me to act.”

Mr. O’Toole earned his eighth best actor nomination for “Venus” (2006), in which he was a lecherous old actor relegated to playing feebleminded royals or men on their deathbeds.

Mr. O’Toole’s personal life, meanwhile, calmed. Though he made regular trips to Ireland, and occasional ones to the racecourse, he came to prefer a settled, reclusive life in his North London house. He published the first two volumes of a projected three-volume autobiography, “Loitering With Intent,” in 1993 (subtitled “The Child”) and 1997 (“The Apprentice”), impressing reviewers with the verve with which he evoked his early years as well as disorienting them with the overblown prose and chronological jumps of what he himself described as “a nonfictional novel.” Apart from his three children — Kate, Pat and Lorcan, who survive him — cricket was Mr. O’Toole’s most lasting love. Indeed, he took a diploma as a professional coach when he was 60, the better to instruct his son and train a London boys’ team. He is also survived by a sister, Patricia Coombs.

But in 1999 he told an interviewer that his only exercise was now “walking behind the coffins of my friends who took exercise.” His once-stormy love life appeared to be over, too. “George Eliot is my only steady girlfriend,” he said. “We go to bed together every night.”

Mellowed, but Not Too Much

Yet the man Johnny Carson described as perhaps his most difficult guest ever was not wholly changed. Mr. O’Toole could be prickly, especially when interviewers asked if he had squandered his talents, or when pet dislikes came up. These included what he called “di-rect-ors,” who he felt had gained too much power over actors; Britain’s National Theater, which he called a “Reich bunker”; and Broadway, which he said was run by “pigs.”

In his later years, he cut not only a raffish figure, continuing to wear green socks in honor of his Irish ancestry and to smoke unfiltered Gauloises from a long cigarette holder, but a gaunt, somewhat intimidating one as well.

Yet his friends knew him as a kindly, generous, responsive man. He claimed that off the stage he sometimes wept with such intensity “that the tears fly out horizontally.” And in the theater his emotional depth was apparent when he played the alcoholic journalist and gambler Jeffrey Bernard. The third and last time he took the role, many felt an essentially comic performance had darkened, deepened and grown in pathos. It was as if Mr. O’Toole were meditating on past loss and waste — as if he were offering a rueful elegy to himself.

In 2000, he was honored with the Outstanding Achievement citation at the Laurence Olivier Awards in London. In 2003, one nomination away from setting a record among actors for the most Oscar nominations without winning — he received an honorary one for lifetime achievement.

At first reluctant to accept, fearing it would somehow signal the end of his career, Mr. O’Toole eventually agreed to the honor as something well earned and started his acceptance speech by saying, not without a note of triumph: “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride — my foot. I have my very own Oscar now to be with me till death us do part.”

SOURCE

Robert Berkvist and Marc Santora contributed reporting.

<nyt_correction_bottom>

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: December 15, 2013

An earlier version of a slide show caption with this article misstated the title and release date of one of the films in which Peter O’Toole starred. It was “How to Steal a Million,” not “How to Steal a Million Dollars,” and it was released in 1966, not 1965.

An earlier version of this obituary misstated the number of times Mr. O’Toole had been unsuccessfully nominated for an acting Oscar in 2003, when he received his honorary award.  At that time, he had been nominated seven times; his eighth unsuccessful nomination came in 2007.  An earlier version also stated in error that he ended his honorary Oscar acceptance speech with the words, “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride — my foot.”  He began the speech with those words.  It also misspelled the first name of the film actor Errol Flynn; it is Errol, not Erroll. It also misspelled the name of the director of the 2004 film “Troy.”  He is Wolfgang Petersen, not Peterson.

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JOAN FONTAINE, WHO WON AN OSCAR FOR HITCHCOCK’S ‘SUSPICION’

By 

Published: December 15, 2013

  • Joan Fontaine, the patrician blond actress who rose to stardom as a haunted second wife in the Alfred Hitchcock film “Rebecca” in 1940 and won an Academy Award for her portrayal of a terrified newlywed in Hitchcock’s “Suspicion,” died at her home in Carmel, Calif., on Sunday. She was 96.

John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images

Joan Fontaine playing the wife of Cary Grant in “Suspicion,” directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Associated Press

Ms. Fontaine winning at the Academy Awards in 1942.

Archive Photos/Getty Images

Ms. Fontaine, center, in “Rebecca,” with George Sanders and Judith Anderson

Her death was confirmed by her assistant, Susan Pfeiffer.

Ms. Fontaine was only 24 when she took home her Oscar in 1942, the youngest best-actress winner at the time, but her victory was equally notable because her older sister, Olivia de Havilland, was also a nominee that year. The sisters were estranged for most of their adult lives, a situation Ms. Fontaine once attributed to her having married and won an Oscar before Ms. de Havilland did.

Until the Hitchcock films, Ms. Fontaine’s movie career had not looked promising. While Ms. de Havilland was starring opposite Errol Flynn in hits like “Captain Blood” and “The Adventures of Robin Hood” and captured the coveted role of Melanie Hamilton in “Gone With the Wind,” Ms. Fontaine struggled.

In 1937 and 1938, she made 10 mostly forgettable pictures, alternating between screwball comedies like “Maid’s Night Out,” in which she starred as a socialite mistaken for a servant, and dramas like “The Man Who Found Himself,” in which she played a noble nurse determined to save a hobo’s life.

In 1939, she appeared in two critically acclaimed pictures. She was a minor player in “Gunga Din,” with Cary Grant and Douglas Fairbanks Jr., but made an impression in the all-female ensemble cast of “The Women.” Those roles were followed by her career-making performance in “Rebecca,” which Frank S. Nugent praised in The New York Times as the film’s “real surprise” and “greatest delight.”

In the 1940s and ’50s, Ms. Fontaine — only slightly typecast as shy, aristocratic or both — had a thriving movie career, starring opposite the era’s male superstars, including Burt Lancaster, Tyrone Power and James Stewart.

She played the title character in “Jane Eyre” (1944), opposite Orson Welles; a romantic obsessive in both “The Constant Nymph” (1943), for which she received an Oscar nomination, and Max Ophüls’s “Letter From an Unknown Woman” (1948); the prim Lady Rowena in “Ivanhoe” (1952); and a British colonial in the Caribbean in the early race-relations drama “Island in the Sun” (1957). That film’s mere suggestion of an interracial romance, between Ms. Fontaine’s character and Harry Belafonte’s, was considered daring.

She made her Broadway debut in 1954, replacing Deborah Kerr as a headmaster’s sensitive wife who helps a young man affirm his sexuality in “Tea and Sympathy.” Brooks Atkinson, writing in The New York Times, preferred Ms. Kerr but called Ms. Fontaine’s performance “forceful and thoughtful” and her New York appearance “one of the better lend-lease deals with Hollywood.”

She returned to Broadway once, in the late 1960s, replacing Julie Harris in the comedy “Forty Carats,” about a middle-aged woman’s romance with a younger man.

Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland was born to British parents on Oct. 22, 1917, in Tokyo, where her father, Walter, a cousin of the aviation pioneer Sir Geoffrey de Havilland, was working as a patent lawyer. In 1919, her mother, the former Lillian Ruse, moved with her two daughters to Saratoga, Calif., near San Francisco. The de Havillands divorced, and Lillian married George M. Fontaine, a department store executive, whose surname Joan later took as her stage name.

Ms. Fontaine, who also briefly used the name Joan Burfield (inspired by a Los Angeles street sign), moved back to Japan at 15 to live with her father and to attend the American School there. Returning in 1934, she soon moved to Los Angeles to pursue a film career.

Her final big-screen roles were the heroine’s jaded older sister in “Tender Is the Night” (1962), based on the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, and a terrified British schoolteacher in “The Devil’s Own,” a 1966 horror film.

Ms. Fontaine married and divorced four times. Her first husband was Brian Aherne, the British-born stage and film actor, whom she married in 1939 and divorced in 1945. She married William Dozier, a film producer, in 1946, and they had a daughter. After their divorce in 1951, she was married to Collier Young, a film and television writer-producer, from 1952 to 1961, and Alfred Wright Jr., a Sports Illustrated editor, from 1964 to 1969.

In 1952, she took in a 5-year-old Peruvian girl, Martita Pareja Calderon. When the girl ran away in her teens, Ms. Fontaine was unable to bring her home because she had never formally adopted the girl in the United States.

Ms. Fontaine is survived by her sister, Ms. de Havilland; a daughter, Deborah Dozier Potter of Santa Fe, N.M.; and a grandson.

She continued acting well into her 70s. She appeared in television movies, including “The Users” (1978) and “Crossings” (1986), based on a Danielle Steel novel. A series of appearances on the soap opera “Ryan’s Hope” in 1980 led to a Daytime Emmy nomination. Her final screen role was as a supportive royal grandmother in “Good King Wenceslas” (1994) on the Family Channel. She also did theater across the United States and abroad, but never returned to film.

“Looking back on Hollywood, looking at it even today,” Ms. Fontaine wrote in “No Bed of Roses” (Morrow, 1978), her autobiography, “I realize that one outstanding quality it possesses is not the lavishness, the perpetual sunshine, the golden opportunities, but fear.” Just as “careers often begin by chance there,” she observed, “they can evaporate just as quickly.”

SOURCE

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DON MITCHELL, A CO-STAR ON TV’S ‘IRONSIDE’

By  DANIEL E. SLOTNIK

Published: December 13, 2013

  • Don Mitchell, an actor best known for playing Raymond Burr’s assistant on the NBC police drama “Ironside” in the 1960s and ’70s, died on Sunday at his home in Encino, Calif.

NBC

Don Mitchell, left, and Raymond Burr in “Ironside,” on NBC.

His death was confirmed by Joseph Babineaux, the publicist for one of his daughters, the actress Julia Pace Mitchell.

“Ironside” starred Mr. Burr as Robert T. Ironside, a retired detective who used a wheelchair. Mr. Mitchell played Mark Sanger, an ex-convict who became Ironside’s bodyguard and assistant. He remained with the show from its debut as a made-for-TV movie in 1967 until it went off the air eight seasons later; along the way his character joined the police force and became a judge.

Mr. Mitchell also appeared on shows like “I Dream of Jeannie,” “The Fugitive” and “The Virginian,” and with Pam Grier and William Marshall in the 1973 film “Scream Blacula, Scream.”

According to most sources, Donald Michael Mitchell was born on March 17, 1943, in Houston. He studied acting at the University of California, Los Angeles. He reprised the role of Mark Sanger in his last credited acting role, in the TV movie “The Return of Ironside,” in 1993.

His marriages to the actress Judy Pace and to Emilie Blake Walker ended in divorce. In addition to Ms. Pace Mitchell, he is survived by another daughter, Shawn Meshelle Mitchell.

A remake of “Ironside,” starring Blair Underwood in the Raymond Burr role, appeared on NBC this fall without a Mark Sanger. It was canceled after a handful of episodes.

SOURCE

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TOM LAUGHLIN, CREATOR OF ‘BILLY JACK’

By  THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Published: December 15, 2013, at 7:29 PM ET

  • NEW YORK — Actor-writer-director Tom Laughlin, whose production and marketing of “Billy Jack” set a standard for breaking the rules on and off screen, has died.

Laughlin’s daughter told The Associated Press that he died Thursday at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Laughlin was 82 and Teresa Laughlin, who acted in the Billy Jack movies, said the cause of death was complications from pneumonia.

“Billy Jack” was released in 1971 after a long struggle by Laughlin to gain control of the low-budget, self-financed movie, a model for guerrilla filmmaking.

He wrote, directed and produced “Billy Jack” and starred as the ex-Green Beret who defends a progressive school against the racists of a conservative Western community. The film became a counterculture favorite and the theme song, “One Tin Soldier,” was a hit single for the rock group Coven.

Laughlin was in his mid-30s when he created Billy Jack with his wife and collaborator, Delores Taylor. Billy Jack was half-white, half Native American, a Vietnam veteran and practitioner of martial arts who had come to hate war. Billy Jack was first seen in the 1968 biker movie “Born Losers,” but became widely known after “Billy Jack,” the second of four films Laughlin made about him (only three made it to theaters).

“Billy Jack” was completed in 1969, but its release was delayed for two years as Laughlin struggled to find studio backing. He eventually successfully sued Warner Bros. to retain rights and — with no support from Hollywood or from theater chains — Laughlin made a radical decision: Distribute the movie himself and rent theaters to show it in. He also was among the first to advertise on television and to immediately open a movie nationwide, rather than release it gradually.

“Billy Jack” initially flopped at the box office, but generated an underground following and became a substantial commercial success and inspiration to independent filmmakers. The title character has been cited as a forerunner for such screen avengers as Rambo.

Laughlin was born in 1931 and grew up in Milwaukee. He played football for the University of South Dakota (where he met his future wife) and Marquette University, but decided he wanted to become an actor after seeing a stage production of “A Streetcar Named Desire.”

“He was profoundly affected by the poverty he saw on the Indian reservations near the University of South Dakota,” Teresa Laughlin said. “I think the seeds of the Billy Jack character started there.”

His early film credits included “South Pacific,” ”Gidget” and Robert Altman’s “The Delinquents.” Laughlin also was interested in directing and writing and by 1960 had directed, written and starred in “The Young Sinner.”

Laughlin wasn’t only a filmmaker. He ran for president as both a Republican and Democrat and founded a Montessori school in California. He was an opponent of nuclear energy and a longtime advocate for Native Americans and bonded with another actor-activist, Marlon Brando.

In recent years, he wrote books and attempted to make another Billy Jack movie.

“There had been lots of interest and deals would sort of come together and not happen,” said Teresa Laughlin, who noted that her father had also battled cancer. “One of the prime reasons that he couldn’t get a deal was his failing health and, I think, his inability to come to terms with that. In his mind’s eye, he remained Billy Jack.”

He is survived by his wife, a sister, three children and five grandchildren.

SOURCE

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HATEWATCH: PROFANITY-LACED VIDEO SHOWS ‘PATROL’ THAT LED TO CRAIG COBB’S MENACING CHARGE

Profanity-Laced Video Shows ‘Patrol’ That Led to Craig Cobb’s Menacing Charge

By Don Terry on December 10, 2013 – 3:58 pm

As he sits in a mental health ward in a state hospital in North Dakota, Craig Cobb, the neo-Nazi who recently discovered on national television that he is 14 percent black, must be thinking there’s no loyalty among thieves – or his fellow racists.

The white nationalists at the Occidental Dissent website posted two silly and embarrassing 13-minute YouTube videos today of Cobb and his racist acolyte and roommate, Kynan Dutton, “patrolling” the streets of Leith, N.D., the tiny town Cobb had hoped to turn into a white enclave.

The videos are tagged on the Occidental site as “humor,” probably because there was no category for “pathetic.”

Dutton’s wife, Deborah, shot the videos on Nov. 16, on a smartphone, as she followed the men, who were both armed with rifles, wandering the unpaved streets of Leith. The patrol came to a halt as Cobb shouted at a woman, calling her “a fucking cunt” and at a man he damned as a “son-of-a-bitch Christian.”

At least Dutton, a 29-year-old ex-soldier, was dressed for the part in black boots and camouflage pants. Cobb, on the other hand, looked like he was running to the store for some milk for his cat. The 62-year-old racist had on jeans, a windbreaker, white socks and black sandals.

“Hey, fuck you with your double-talk Christian shit, man,” Cobb shouts at a resident watching the armed men walk through the town, population 16. “You act like a man. You go up there and tell the rest of them to comport themselves with some goddamned dignity. Fuck you. You fucking kike, Jew cocker sucker.”

“I can only control my own behavior,” the man responds. “I can’t control what everyone else does.”

“I can control mine, too,” Cobb says. “I’m not shooting you, am I? Fuck you.”

“This is called protection,” Dutton’s wife pipes in. “We have a legal right.”

“Do you think this is going to win people over to what you’re trying to do?” the resident asks.

“Hey, listen asshole,” Cobb shouts back. “I’m one of the most famous racists in the world, you son of a bitch. Don’t talk to me about winning people over.”

“I know you are,” the resident says. “But I’m asking, do you think this is going to win people over?

“Jackasses like you, we don’t care,” Cobb says. “You’re a tool of the kikes. You understand. You’re deceived up in your own brain. You think you’re really somebody. Fuck you and your fucking pie-in-the sky, spooks-in-the-sky crap.”

Cobb rants on and eventually the man says, “I pray for you everyday.”

“Fuck you,” Cobb says. “That’s your way of putting me down, you shithole.”

“It is not,” the man replies. “I pray for myself everyday.”

As the patrol continues, Cobb and Dutton discuss their response if attacked by neighbors opposed to Cobb turning their town into a racist outpost on the prairie. Cobb claimed that he and Dutton started patrolling the town because of acts of violence and harassment directed at them, though that appears to  have been imagined.

“I tell you,” Cobb says in the video, “the way it’s going, I wouldn’t be surprised if they do come attack us at some point.”

“Well, good,” Dutton says. “I’ve been meaning to get some target practice.”

“Be sure they fire the first shot,” Cobb says. “They have to fire the first shot.”

“I fire the second one,” Dutton agrees.

“Maybe the second and third,” Cobb says.

As the patrol began, Deborah Dutton did a voiceover.

“This is Mr. Cobb,” she said, “and my lover, Kynan Dutton, patrolling with sexy-ass guns.

“Stop the hate.”

It turned out to be a costly walkabout for Cobb.

Later that gray November day, Cobb and Dutton were arrested by sheriff’s deputies and charged with seven counts of terrorizing. They were held without bail in the Mercer County Jail. Cobb refused to eat, and about a week later he was taken to a state hospital for a mental health evaluation.

No word on the results.

SOURCE

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SKYWATCH: GEMINIDS TO PEAK SATURDAY, WATER PLUMES ON EUROPA, AND MORE

News
water plume on Europa

Kurt Retherford (Southwest Research Institute)

Plumes on Europa

December 12, 2013                                                                | New Hubble Space Telescope observations provide the best evidence yet that Jupiter’s icy moon spits out water vapor from its surface. If real, such plumes could reach more than 100 miles above the little world’s surface and rain down an extraterrestrial form of snow. > read more

 

Curiosity Finds a Once-Habitable Mars

December 13, 2013                                                                | Ancient Mars seems to have had all the necessities as a comfy habitat for microbial life. > read more

 

New View of Saturn’s Hexagon

December 9, 2013                                                                | NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has captured phenomenal images of the gigantic weather system at Saturn’s north pole. This so-called “hexagon” is nearly three times wider than Earth is. > read more

 

A Double Black Hole?

December 10, 2013                                                                | Strange emission from a distant galaxy paints an enigmatic picture of what’s happening inside its core. One solution: instead of one supermassive black hole, the galaxy hosts two trapped in a tight dance around each other. > read more

 

Hubble Homes in on Hazy Worlds

December 12, 2013                                                                | Two teams have announced the discovery of water on alien worlds. But they found less water than expected, suggesting these planets are surrounded by a high-altitude haze. > read more

 

Observing

Meteor

Alan Dyer

Geminid Meteors to Pierce the Moonlight

December 6, 2013                                                                | Bits of rock from a fried asteroid flash across the night sky in the mid-December sky — but bright moonlight will diminish the performance. > read more

 

Tour December’s Sky by Eye and Ear!

December 1, 2013                                                                  | December’s crystal-clear skies offer Venus low in the west after sunset, a “tower of brilliance” (including Jupiter) rising in the east, and the prospect of a nice showing by Comet ISON in the predawn sky early in the month. > read more

 

Community

Comet ISON on Nov. 15, 2013

Damian Peach / SkyandTelescope.com

S&T‘s Comet ISON Photo Contest

December 6, 2013                                                                | The “comet of the century” famously lost its battle against the Sun, but our photo contest carries on with a chance to win some hefty prizes. And there are only about 2 weeks to the deadline! > read more

 

This Week’s Sky at a Glance

Looking east at nightfall

This Week’s Sky at a Glance

December 13, 2013                                                                  | The days grow their shortest, the Geminid meteors shower, and the Moon passes through. . . Orion?! > read more

 

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INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY: DECEMBER 11, 2013

 

INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Mountain Day is an occasion to help raise awareness of the people who live in mountainous regions and the role that these regions play in providing food, water, and recreation. It is observed on December 11 each year.

Local names

Name Language
International Mountain Day English
Día Internacional de las Montañas Spanish
יום ההר הבינלאומי Hebrew
يوما دوليا للجبال Arabic
국제 산의 날 Korean
Welttag der Berge German

International Mountain Day 2013 Theme: “Mountains: Key to a Sustainable Future”

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

International Mountain Day 2014

Thursday, December 11, 2014

The year 2002 was the International Year of Mountains. As this year drew to a close, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly proclaimed December 11 to be International Mountain Day. This observance, which is celebrated annually, aims to draw attention to the important roles that mountainous regions play in water and food supply.

International Mountain Day commemorates the role in which mountains play in providing food, water, and recreation.

©iStockphoto.com/Joseph Jean

What do people do?

Various activities are organized on and around International Mountain Day. These aim to increase awareness of and knowledge around the role of mountains and mountainous regions amongst the general population and professionals. Particular examples of events are: book fairs; symposia; themed lectures for students; workshops and press events. Mountaineering and explorations societies may hold lectures and social events on or around December 11.

Public life

International Mountain Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

The International Year of Mountains was held in 2002 and with the aim of raising awareness and triggering action on issues relating to sustainable mountain development. The leading agency was the Food and Agriculture Organization. The International Year of Mountains was launched at the headquarters of the United Nations in New York on December 11, 2001.

On December 20, 2002, as the International Year of Mountains drew to a close, the UN designated December 11 as International Mountain Day and encouraged the international community to organize events to highlight the importance of sustainable mountain development on this date. International Mountain Day was first observed on December 11, 2003. Each year International Mountain Day has a particular theme. Previous themes have focused on freshwater, peace, biodiversity or climate change.

Symbols

The symbol of International Mountain Day consists of three equilateral triangles, each orientated with two points on a single imaginary horizontal line and one point directed upwards. The triangles are mainly black and represent mountains. The triangle on the left has a blue “diamond” shape at the top, representing ice or snow at the top of a mountain. The middle triangle has an orange circle at its center, representing resources that are mined from inside mountains. The triangle on the right has a small green triangle at its lower right-hand point.

This represents the crops that grow on mountains. Under the three triangles is a black stripe containing the words “11 December” and the words “International Mountain Day” in two shades of United Nations’ use of the color blue. The symbol of International Mountain Day is based on the symbol for the International Year of Mountains (2002).

International Mountain Day Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Dec 11 2003 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 11 2004 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 11 2005 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 11 2006 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 11 2007 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 11 2008 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 11 2009 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 11 2010 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 11 2011 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 11 2012 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 11 2013 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 11 2014 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 11 2015 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 11 2016 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 11 2017 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 11 2018 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 11 2019 International Mountain Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 11 2020 International Mountain Day United Nations observance

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HUMAN RIGHTS DAY: DECEMBER 10, 2013

 

HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

Quick Facts

Human Rights Day is an occasion for people worldwide to know and consider the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Local names

Name Language
Human Rights Day English
Día de los Derechos Humanos Spanish
יום זכויות האדם Hebrew
يوم حقوق الإنسان Arabic
세계 인권 선언일 Korean
Internationaler Tag der Menschenrechte German

Human Rights Day 2013 Theme: “20 Years Working For Your Rights”

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Human Rights Day 2014

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) Human Rights Day is annually observed December 10 to mark the anniversary of the presentation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

 

Many schools and libraries have books that educate people about human rights.

©iStockphoto.com/ RichVintage

What do people do?

Events focused on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights are held worldwide on and around December 10. Many events aim to educate people, especially children and teenagers, on their human rights and the importance of upholding these in their own communities and further afield.

The day may also include protests to alert people of circumstances in parts of the world where the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is not recognized or respected, or where the importance of these rights are not considered to be important. Cultural events are also organized to celebrate the importance of human rights through music, dance, drama or fine art.

Public life

Human Rights Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted between January 1947 and December 1948. It aimed to form a basis for human rights all over the world and represented a significant change of direction from events during World War II and the continuing colonialism that was rife in the world at the time. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is considered as the most translated document in modern history. It is available in more than 360 languages and new translations are still being added.

The UN General Assembly adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the Palais de Chaillot in Paris, France, on the December 10, 1948. All states and interested organizations were invited to mark December 10 as Human Rights Day at a UN meeting on December 4, 1950. It was first observed on December 10 that year and has been observed each year on the same date. Each year Human Rights Day has a theme. Some of these themes have focused on people knowing their human rights or the importance of human rights education.

Symbols

The UN symbol (an azimuthal equidistant projection of the globe centered on the North Pole surrounded by olive branches) is often associated with Human Rights Day. Copies of the whole Universal Declaration of Human Rights are also regarded as symbolic of Human Rights Day and are often distributed on or around December 10.

Human Rights Day Observances

 

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Mon Dec 10 1990 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 10 1991 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 10 1992 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 10 1993 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 10 1994 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 10 1995 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 10 1996 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 10 1997 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 10 1998 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 10 1999 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 10 2000 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 10 2001 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 10 2002 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 10 2003 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 10 2004 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 10 2005 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 10 2006 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 10 2007 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 10 2008 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 10 2009 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 10 2010 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 10 2011 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 10 2012 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 10 2013 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 10 2014 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 10 2015 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 10 2016 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 10 2017 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 10 2018 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 10 2019 Human Rights Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 10 2020 Human Rights Day United Nations observance

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INTERNATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION DAY: DECEMBER 9, 2013

INTERNATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION DAY

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Anti-Corruption Day is annually observed on December 9 to raise public awareness of corruption and ways to fight it.

Local names

Name Language
International Anti-Corruption Day English
Día Internacional contra la Corrupción Spanish
יום נגד השחיתות הבינלאומית Hebrew
اليوم العالمي لمكافحة الفساد Arabic
국제 반부패의 날 Korean
Welt-Anti-Korruptions-Tag German

International Anti-Corruption Day 2013

Monday, December 9, 2013

International Anti-Corruption Day 2014

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

The United Nations’ (UN) International Anti-Corruption Day aims to raise public awareness of corruption and what people can do to fight it. It is observed on December 9 each year.

Musicals, plays, keynote speeches and other activities that focus on the theme of fighting against corruption help promote International Anti-Corruption Day.©iStockphoto.com/Nikada

What do people do?

International Anti-Corruption Day is a time for political leaders, governments, legal bodies and lobby groups to work together against corruption work by promoting the day and the issues that surround this event. On this day anti-corruption advocates organize events to engage the general public to effectively fight against corruption and fraud in communities. Other activities that promote the day include:

  • Musicals and plays to publicize the message of fighting against corruption.
  • Keynote speeches by those who were victims of corruption or fought against it.
  • Essay competitions on issues surrounding the topic of corruption.
  • The dissemination of posters, flyers and other material to increase awareness levels on corruption.

Some organizations hold special recognition ceremonies to pay tribute to people and projects that provide assistance to nations and communities in the battle against corruption.

Public life

International Anti-Corruption Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

Corruption is an issue that affects all countries around the world. It can refer to the destruction of one’s honesty or loyalty through undermining moral integrity or acting in a way that shows a lack of integrity or honesty. It also refers to those who use a position of power or trust for dishonest gain. Corruption undermines democracy, creates unstable governments, and sets countries back economically. Corruption comes in various forms such as bribery, law-breaking without dealing with the consequences in a fair manner, unfairly amending election processes and results, and covering mistakes or silencing whistleblowers (those who expose corruption in hope that justice would be served).

By resolution 58/4 of October 31, 2003, the UN General Assembly designated December 9 as International Anti-Corruption Day. This decision aimed to raise people’s awareness of corruption and of the role of the United Nations Convention against Corruption in combating and preventing it. The assembly urged all states and competent regional economic integration organizations to sign and ratify the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) to ensure its rapid entry into force. UNCAC is the first legally binding, international anti-corruption instrument that provides a chance to mount a global response to corruption.

Symbols

Posters, slogans, and other promotional material on International Anti-Corruption Day have featured a slogan or logo that takes up two lines. The first line reads “CORRUPTION” in capitalized red words, and underneath are the words “Your NO counts”. Most of the second line is written in black text except for the word “NO” which is highlighted in red capital letters within a white speech bubble.

The UN logo is also associated with promotions for this event. It features a projection of a world map (less Antarctica) centered on the North Pole, inscribed in a wreath consisting of crossed conventionalized branches of the olive tree. The olive branches symbolize peace and the world map depicts the area of concern to the UN in achieving its main purpose, peace and security. The projection of the map extends to 60 degrees south latitude, and includes five concentric circles.

International Anti-Corruption Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Tue Dec 9 2003 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 9 2004 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 9 2005 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 9 2006 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 9 2007 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 9 2008 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 9 2009 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Thu Dec 9 2010 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 9 2011 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 9 2012 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 9 2013 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Tue Dec 9 2014 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 9 2015 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Fri Dec 9 2016 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Sat Dec 9 2017 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Sun Dec 9 2018 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Mon Dec 9 2019 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance
Wed Dec 9 2020 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nations observance

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