ON THIS DAY IN BLACK MUSIC HISTORY: NOVEMBER 13

#1 R&B Song 1971: “Inner City Blues,” Marvin Gaye

Born: Louisa “Blue Lu” Barker, 1913; Jeannette “Baby” Washington, 1940

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1954 The Moonglows’ first hit,  “Sincerely” (#20 pop, #1 R&B), and “Shoo Doo Be Doo” by their alter ego, the Moonlighters, were released the same day. Also released were the Flaminogs’ “Blues In a Letter” ($600), the Orioles’ “Runaround” ($50), and the Platters’ “Shake It Up Mambo” ($200), all collector’s rarities.

1961 Gene McDaniels charted with “Tower of Strength,” reaching #5 both R&B and pop. Gene started out singing in a gospel-turned-R&B group in Nebraska. They recorded as the Sultans in 1954 and later became the Admirals. As a writer, gene is best known for creating Roberta Flack’s smash “Feel Like makin’ Love.”

1963 Picking up on Motown’s Motortown Revue idea, Atlantic records began its own Atlantic caravan of Stars roster including the Drifters, Ben E. King, Rufus Thomas, Otis Redding, the Falcons, Doris Troy, and King Curtis and his crew.

1965 The Crystals embarked on their second Dick Clark caravan of Stars tour, starting in New Haven, CT, along with the Supremes, Dee Dee Sharp, the Drifters, Bobby Freeman, Brian Hyland, and Lou Christie.

1975 British songstress Joan Armatrading began a thirty-ciy tour of the United Kingdom, along with label mates Supertramp, at Colston Hall, Bristol, Avon, England. Joan was a sel-taught musician on piano and guitar and was influenced by the first album she bought at nineteen, Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks.

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1 Comment

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One response to “ON THIS DAY IN BLACK MUSIC HISTORY: NOVEMBER 13

  1. Leonie Cohen

    I am so happy to come accross this website, it was purely by accident while looking for evidence to show the young people that we work with that black actually fought in the wars to defend their country.
    Please keep me posted on everything concerning “on this day relevant to black issues”

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