COLORLINES: DREAM VOTE LOOMS AS PRESSURE BUILDS

December 2, 2010 ColorLines Direct | Published by the Applied Research
Center

Senate
Negotiations Narrow DREAM Act’s Scope as Vote Nears

Legislators are jockeying and the White House is weighing in big as both chambers ready a
lame-duck vote. Julianne Hing is following the action.
For up to the moment news on the DREAM Act visit colorlines.com/dream

A
Conversation with Harry Belafonte on Race and Politics Today

The music legend and human rights icon sits down with ColorLines publisher
Rinku Sen.
Also: Harry
Belafonte’s Love for Racial Justice—and Radical
Muppets

The AIDS
Epidemic Has Always Been Defined by What We Don’t Know

On World AIDS Day, three black Americans look back on decades of
misunderstanding about HIV.
D.C.’s
Trading Games Leave Working People Out
While jobless workers
wait for relief, the White House compromises away any hopes.
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Gets Old With New
Marines

The military ban overwhelmingly impacts black
women.
Victoria’s
Secret Saves Dark Skinned Models for “Wild Things” Segment

This year’s annual fashion show included
indigenous dance. Concerned? We are too.
Woman Who Confronted Obama Now Out of a
Job

Valerie Hart infamously told the president that she’s
tired of defending him.
Report: New York’s Truancy Policies That Punish Parents Don’t
Work

Schools should spend their resources on better data
collection and proactively supportive, instead of punitive, outreach.
Art and Activism Come Together to Make DREAM a
Reality

The fight to pass the DREAM Act moves from
Congress to the canvas.
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HATEWATCH: TALLY GROWS OF VIEWERS MOVED TO VIOLENCE BY BECK’S RANTS

Tally Grows of Viewers Moved to Violence by Beck’s Rants

by Leah Nelson  December 1, 2010
Through countless diagrams and diatribes, chalk-wielding Fox News commentator Glenn Beck has made it his mission to inform his audience that left-wing progressives are purportedly on the brink of revolution. Many of Beck’s fans take him seriously. In the past two years, at least three have decided the best response to his warnings is violence.
Kenneth B. Kimbley Jr. of Spirit Lake, Idaho, is the latest to face prison time for interpreting Beck’s rants as a call to action.
Kimbley claims to be the leader of the Brotherhood of America Patriots, an extreme-right militia whose mission, he says, is to “resist in the event the government started rounding up the patriots” and to stand up in the face of foreign invasions or societal breakdowns. (Authorities believe Kimbley’s group was tiny.) At the time of his arrest in July, Kimbley had 20,000 rounds of ammunition, a stock of firearms, and materials he planned to use to construct grenades, according to court documents.
According to the Spokesman-Review of Spokane, Wash., Kimbley’s lawyer described her client as a man with strong political views who posed no real danger to society. “In fact, everything said by Mr. Kimbley is no different than what his idol, TV commentator Glenn Beck, typically states on the air,” public defender Kim Deater wrote in court papers.
Byron Williams and Richard Poplawski, also Beck fans, got a lot farther in their alleged antigovernment actions before being caught.
Williams, who likened Beck to a “schoolteacher,” is charged with shooting and wounding two members of the California Highway Patrol during a July confrontation that occurred on his way to San Francisco, where he allegedly planned to start a revolution by assassinating leaders at the ACLU and the Tides Foundation, both regular targets of Beck’s furious rants. (The Tides Foundation, in fact, would be barely known if not for at least 29 mentions made by Beck, including two in the week before the shootout, according to Media Matters.)
Poplawski, for his part, allegedly shot three police officers to death in April 2009 after his mother called them to the Pittsburgh home they shared.
“Rich, like myself, loved Glenn Beck,” Eddie Perkovic, Poplawski’s best friend told reporter Will Bunch of Media Matters, among others. Prior to the shooting, Poplawski reportedly was “obsessed” with two of Beck’s pet theories: that there is an imminent food crisis and that paper money will soon be worthless. Like Kimbley and Williams, Poplawski worried that the government planned to intern dissidents in concentration camps.
Although Beck in the past has denied responsibility for the extreme actions of his viewers, it isn’t surprising his inflammatory expositions about what the government and its “progressive” allies are doing could push certain people over the edge and into violence.
Dubbing himself a “progressive hunter,” Beck proclaimed in January that like the “Israeli Nazi hunters … I’m going to expose what [progressives] have done and make sure that people understand.” In June, he said “anarchists, Marxists, communists, revolutionaries, Maoists” would need to “eliminate 10% of the population” to “gain control.” In July, he said that “[t]he army… of the extreme left is gathering” and that it believes that “cops are bad, kill the cops, they’re the oppressors.” In September, he warned, “Violence will come. And violence will come from the left. Violence is part of the plan.”
The connection between Kimbley’s beliefs and Beck’s provocative on-air statements seems clear, especially his fear that the government plans to round up and intern liberty-loving Americans, a fear that was also expressed by Poplawski and Byron.
One of Beck’s earliest public flirtations with the idea that government concentration camps might be real came in March 2009, exactly a month to the day before Poplawski allegedly opened fire on officers responding to a domestic dispute at his home. (Alex Jones, a far-right antigovernment conspiracy theorist and repeat FOX guest who Williams cited as an additional influence, also had trumpeted the theory for some time.) Beck has since claimed to debunk the idea of government camps, but the rest of his rhetoric is hardly even-handed. And though he tempers his endless alarms with reminders that “it is not time to pick up guns” or “blow anything up,” his most volatile fans apparently take these admonitions with a grain of salt.
“Beck is gonna deny everything about a violent approach and deny everything about conspiracies,” Williams told John Hamilton of Media Matters. “But he’ll give you every reason to believe it.”

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IN REMEMBRANCE: 12-5-2010

ELINE KAUFMAN, OWNER OF ‘ELAINE’S’, WHO FED AND FUSSED OVER THE FAMOUS

By ENID NEMY

Published: December 3, 2010

Elaine Kaufman, who became something of a symbol of New York as the salty den mother of Elaine’s, one of the city’s best-known restaurants and a second home for almost half a century to writers, actors, athletes and other celebrities, died Friday in Manhattan. She was 81.

December 4, 2010    

Michael Falco for The New York Times

Elaine Kaufman of Elaine’s in 2005. More Photos »

Her death, at Lenox Hill Hospital, was caused by complications of emphysema, said Diane Becker, the restaurant’s manager.

To the patrons she knew at her Upper East Side establishment, Ms. Kaufman was the quirky, opinionated, tender-hearted and imposingly heavyset proprietor who came in almost every night to check on things and schmooze, moving from table to table and occasionally perching herself on a stool at the end of her 25-foot mahogany bar.

With those she did not know, her demeanor varied; some accused her of being rude, though she indignantly denied that she ever was. As she put it, she had little time to explain to dissatisfied customers why they were being directed to tables in the back, known as Siberia, or led to the bar or even turned away, when they could clearly see empty tables along “the line.”

The line was the row of tables along the right wall of the main room, extending from the front to the back and visible from the entrance. Those tables were almost always saved for the most valued regulars, with or without reservations. One regular was Woody Allen, who filmed a scene for “Manhattan” at Elaine’s.

Elaine’s, in fact, was a scene, a noisy restaurant and bar celebrated as a celebrity hangout that all but shouted “New York” to the rest of the country, if not the world. For Billy Joel, in his 1979 hit “Big Shot,” the very name connoted the uptown in-crowd. (“They were all impressed with your Halston dress/And the people that you knew at Elaine’s.”) And in the new movie “Morning Glory,” with Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton and Rachel McAdams, the indomitable Ms. Kaufman herself makes a cameo appearance.

Of course, it was an unspoken rule among the customers never to appear overly impressed or distracted by the famous. This was New York, after all. But there were exceptions, Ms. Kaufman recalled. Mick Jagger was one. (“The room grew still,” she said.) Luciano Pavarotti was another. (“Everyone stood up and applauded.”) And Willie Nelson proved irresistible. (“He kissed all the women at the bar.”)

Once, when a newcomer asked directions to the men’s room, Ms. Kaufman replied, “Take a right at Michael Caine.”

Ms. Kaufman opened her restaurant in 1963, along an unfashionable block on Second Avenue just north of 88th Street. Soon a loyal clientele began to form, as if by chain reaction.

Almost from the beginning there were writers, many of whom were granted credit privileges when cash was low or nonexistent. And the writers — Gay Talese, George Plimpton, Peter Maas, Dan Jenkins, Joseph Heller, Mario Puzo, Frank Conroy and others — drew editors: Clay Felker, Willie Morris and James Brady, to name a few.

Then came the theater, film and television personalities, eager to meet literary lights. And they, having added to the growing cultural cachet of Elaine’s, soon attracted the famous from other arenas — sports figures, politicians and gossip-column society — all wanting to be part of the scene.

Elaine’s flourished, despite its less-than-stellar reputation for food. For 14 years, it was the site of the New York Oscar-night parties hosted by Entertainment Weekly. “I live a party life,” Ms. Kaufman said in an interview in 1983 in The New York Times. “Elsa Maxwell used to have to send out invitations. I just open the door.”

Elaine Edna Kaufman was born in Manhattan on Feb. 10, 1929, one of four children of Joseph and Pauline Kaufman. Brought up in Queens and the Bronx, she graduated from Evander Childs High School in the Bronx and worked at the stamp department at Gimbels, a wholesale fabric house and the long-gone Astor Pharmacy, where she was night cosmetician. She also sold cigars and checked hats at the Progressive Era Political Club in Greenwich Village before being introduced to the restaurant business by Alfredo Viazzi.

Mr. Viazzi, a former seaman and struggling writer, owned Portofino, a Greenwich Village restaurant popular with publishing and downtown theater people, and in 1959 he and Ms. Kaufman, having begun a romantic relationship, joined forces in running it.

When she broke up with Mr. Viazzi four years later, she “took my pots and pans” and decided to open her own restaurant. “I couldn’t afford to open in the Village,” she said, “so I found an Austrian-Hungarian restaurant in an area of the Upper East Side which was Siberia then.” She bought it with a partner for “$10,000 or $12,000,” she said. (Within eight years she was the sole owner.)

Many of her old patrons followed her uptown, and neighborhood celebrities like the painters Helen Frankenthaler and Robert Motherwell, who were married at the time, began dropping in. She was also discovered by the columnists Dorothy Kilgallen and Leonard Lyons.

During the first year, Ms. Kaufman waited on tables herself; one summer Elaine Stritch, unwilling to do summer stock, tended bar.

The restaurant’s indifferent décor — the comedian Alan King once said the place was “decorated like a stolen car” — changed little through the years. The rummage from junk shops and $5 light fixtures remained, but one feature continued to grow: the framed covers of books by authors who ate and drank there. Several hundred of the covers festooned the walls between the main dining area and the adjoining Paul Desmond room — named after the jazz saxophonist, another regular — which was used for overflow crowds, private parties and sometimes B-, C- and D-list people.

In the later 1960s Ms. Kaufman bought the low-rise building that houses the restaurant as well as the building next to it. The rental apartments above helped finance the restaurant over the years.

Ms. Kaufman treated many of her regular patrons as both friends and extended family, though she had her limits. She had several run-ins with well-known personalities. After an argument with her, Norman Mailer vowed never to return and wrote her an unflattering letter. She scribbled “Boring” across the top and sent it back to him. A day or two later, he was back.

In 1998, Ms. Kaufman was arrested on assault charges after slapping a customer. The case involved a man and a woman who said she had called them “white trash” after they ordered one drink between them. Ms. Kaufman denied using the expression and said she had slapped the man only after “he got in my face.” The charges were later dropped, as were civil lawsuits that both Ms. Kaufman and the customer filed.

Ms. Kaufman was married in 1980 to Henry Ball, who was also in the restaurant business. They were divorced in 1984, and he died in later years. Ms. Kaufman, who lived in Manhattan, is survived by three nephews, a niece and several cousins. The restaurant will remain open and maintain the same hours and staff, Ms. Becker said.

Though patronage at Elaine’s fell off in the late 1980s, it returned within several years, and the restaurant, which often stays open until the wee hours, once again became a favorite of celebrities. It was a prime destination on summer Sunday evenings, when weekenders returning to the city stopped in for dinner. But on almost any night, the regulars treated it as their club, talking to friends and to Elaine and playing darts, card games and backgammon. The games ended some years ago, but the ambience remained.

In 2003, Ms. Kaufman was named a Living Landmark by the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

“I’ve lived just about the most perfect life,” Ms. Kaufman said in 1998. “I’ve had the best time. If I wanted to do something, I did it. Designers designed my clothes and did my apartment. I had house seats for the theater. I was invited to screenings and book parties. I’ve had fun. What else can you ask in life?”

SOURCE

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HELEN BOATRIGHT, CELEBRATED SOPRANO
 
By MARGALIT FOX
Published: December 4, 2010
Helen Boatwright, an American soprano renowned for her interpretations of Charles Ives, died on Wednesday in Jamesville, N.Y., outside Syracuse. She was 94 and had lived nearby in Fayetteville, N.Y.
December 5, 2010    

Friedberg Managment

Helen Boatwright

Her son Howard confirmed the death.

A concert and oratorio singer who performed in public until she was in her 90s, Mrs. Boatwright was known for her pure, unfussy sound; impeccable diction; and thoughtful, sensitive interpretations. These attributes made her well suited for early music and contemporary works, and throughout her career she sang both, to favorable notices.

Mrs. Boatwright gave the world premiere performances of some of Ives’s songs and, with the pianist John Kirkpatrick, made the first extensive recording of his songs. The album, originally titled “Twenty-Four Songs,” was first released in 1954 on the Overtone label.

At the other end of the historical continuum, Mrs. Boatwright appeared as a soloist with many of the country’s best-known early-music groups, including the Yale Collegium Musicum, founded by the eminent composer Paul Hindemith, and the Cantata Singers in New York.

Among the conductors with whom she performed are Leopold Stokowski, Erich Leinsdorf, Seiji Ozawa and Zubin Mehta.

Mrs. Boatwright’s work took her to many of the country’s best-known concert halls as well as to the White House, where she sang for President John F. Kennedy in 1963.

She also taught at Syracuse University, the Eastman School of Music, the Peabody Conservatory of Music and elsewhere.

Helena Johanna Strassburger, known as Helen, was born on Nov. 17, 1916, in Sheboygan, Wis. She was the youngest of six children in a family of gifted amateur singers; Bach chorales in four-part harmony were sung nightly around the dinner table.

She earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music from the Oberlin College Conservatory. In 1942, while she was a graduate student, she sang at Tanglewood in a production of Otto Nicolai’s opera “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” opposite a young tenor named Mario Lanza in his operatic debut.

In 1943, she married Howard Leake Boatwright Jr., a violinist and composer. In the decades that followed, the couple performed together in many recitals, and Mrs. Boatwright often sang songs by her husband, written for her.

Mrs. Boatwright, who also appeared frequently in joint recitals with other singers, did not make her New York solo recital debut until 1967, when she performed Hindemith’s song cycle “Das Marienleben“ at Town Hall.

Reviewing the concert in The New York Times, Raymond Ericson wrote that Mrs. Boatwright “sang the cycle as she has other music, with a total submersion of her own personality in the work.” He added: “She has a voice of rare purity, and she sings phrases with comparable clarity and firm outline.”

Mrs. Boatwright’s husband died in 1999. Besides her son, Howard Leake III, known as Lea, she is survived by another son, David Alexander, and a daughter, Alice Karth Boatwright.

If the concert singing Mrs. Boatwright favored has less marquee value than opera, which she performed on occasion, then that, she made unequivocally clear, was fine with her.

“I sing opera, but I am a musician,” she told The Sheboygan Press in 2004. “I teach too many crummy kids who think they’ve got to be opera singers. Opera is such a teeny tiny part in the world of music. I don’t want to be called an opera singer.”

SOURCE

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AL MASINI, ‘ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT’ CREATOR

By DENNIS HEVESI

Published: December 1, 2010

Al Masini, a creator of hit television shows that often focused on glamour and fame, among them “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” and “Entertainment Tonight,” the breezy show business news program that has run for 29 years, died on Monday in Honolulu. He was 80.

December 2, 2010    

Edward Hausner/The New York Times

Al Masini was the force behind many long-running TV hits.

The cause was cancer, his publicist, Kristin Jackson, told The Associated Press.

For years the tabloid-style “Entertainment Tonight” has billed itself as “the most watched entertainment newsmagazine in the world.” That is just what Mr. Masini and his colleagues at TeleRep, the company he founded in 1968, had in mind when the show had its premiere on Sept. 14, 1981. Its fast-paced, paparazzi-like mix of celebrity news and gossip, inspired by TV Guide and People magazine, was often scoffed at by critics. That didn’t turn off viewers. It is scheduled to run at least through the 2012 season.

While “Entertainment Tonight” was Mr. Masini’s biggest hit, he was also the hard-driving force behind other long-running shows, most of them in syndication. His first, “Solid Gold,” which originally starred the pop singer Dionne Warwick, offered a countdown of the Top 10 songs of the week, several pick hits and the occasional oldie. It ran from 1980 to 1988.

“Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,” which displayed the extravagance of entertainers, athletes and business moguls, ran from 1984 to 1996. It was hosted by Robin Leach, a seemingly breathless Englishman, who, in his closing catchphrase, expressed the hope that viewers would have “Champagne wishes and caviar dreams.”

Among Mr. Masini’s many other shows was “Star Search,” with Ed McMahon as host, which gave unknown performers their big chance before a national audience.

Mr. Masini also dealt with more serious fare. In 1976 he organized a nationwide consortium of local stations under the name Operation Prime Time. With many mini-series and television specials, the syndicate demonstrated that it could deliver dramatic hits, like those produced by the networks. Its 1982 mini-series “A Woman Called Golda,” starring Ingrid Bergman as the Israeli prime minister Golda Meir, won three Emmy Awards.

“All of my ideas come from studying what’s not on the air,” Mr. Masini told The New York Times in 1986. “Most people think the simplest way to sell a show is to say it’s like another show. If ‘Cosby’ is a hit, soon you get 10 ‘Cosby’ imitations. My attitude has always been to look for what’s missing. If historically there was an appetite for a certain type of show — or, if the appetite is apparent through other media — then I try to fill the need.”

Alfred Michael Masini was born in Jersey City on Jan. 5, 1930, to Alfred and Marie Malta Masini. He graduated from Fordham University in 1952 and soon was working as a film editor at the CBS-TV library in New York. He joined an advertising company in New York in 1956 before going on to found TeleRep.

Mr. Masini is survived by his wife, Charlyn Honda Masini, and his sister, Melba Marvinny.

When it came to nuts-and-bolts television production, Mr. Masini did not relegate himself to the executive suite. In 1980, when “Solid Gold” was about to begin its long run, he flew from his New York office to Los Angeles so he could personally choreograph the dance numbers.

“Sure, we had a choreographer,” he later told The Times, “but I knew what I wanted. I can’t be happy unless I have complete control.”

SOURCE

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

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INTERNATIONAL VOLUNTEER DAY FOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: DECEMBER 5, 2010

INTERNATIONAL VOLUNTEER DAY FOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVEOLPMENT

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development, also known as International Volunteer Day (IVD), is observed on December 5 each year.

Local names

Name Language
International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development English
Día Internacional de los Voluntarios para el Desarrollo Económico y Social Spanish

Alternative name

International Volunteer Day

International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development 2010

Sunday, December 5, 2010

International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development 2011

Monday, December 5, 2011
See list of observations below.

The United Nations (UN) annually observes the International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development on December 5. The day, which is also known as International Volunteer Day (IVD), gives volunteers a chance to work together on projects and campaigns promoting their contributions to economic and social development at local, national and international levels.

International Volunteer Day recognizes the work of volunteers and the importance of volunteering. ©iStockphoto.com/Steven Robertson

What do people do?

This day  hopes to heighten people’s and governments’ awareness of the voluntary  contributions. It also focuses on stimulating people to offer their services as  volunteers, both at home and abroad. Over the years, governments, businesses,  nonprofit organizations, and individuals contribute the International Volunteer  Day through various activities including:

  • Voluntary  community projects.
  • Parades,  marches, or rallies.
  • Award  ceremonies for volunteers who made significant contributions to their  communities.
  • “Time  donation” campaigns that involve people pledging hours of voluntary service to  specific projects.
  • Companies  launching voluntary programs as part of their corporate responsibility.
  • Volunteer  competitions.

Activities  and events for the day help promote the impact of volunteering and the UN’s  Millennium Development Goals, via volunteering to:

  • Help  eradicate poverty.
  • Achieve  universal primary education.
  • Promote  gender equality and empower women.
  • Reduce  child mortality and to improve maternal health.
  • Reverse  the spread of HIV/AIDS, malaria and other major diseases.
  • Help  ensure environmental sustainability.

Many people  participate in many of these events through the World Volunteer Web, which the  United Nations Volunteers (UNV) operates in partnership with various  organizations.

Public life

International  Volunteer Day is a global observance and not a public holiday. Some organizations, businesses and communities may take the time to contribute to the day through activities  mentioned earlier in this article.

Background

Each year  UN General Assembly invites governments to observe the International Volunteer  Day for Economic and Social Development on December 5 (A/RES/40/212 of 17  December 1985). As a result of the resolution from December 17, 1985,  governments, the UN, and civil society organizations work together with  volunteers around the world to celebrate the Day on December 5 each year.

In 2001,  the International Year of Volunteers, the Assembly adopted a set of  recommendations on ways that governments and the UN could support volunteering  and asked that they be widely disseminated. The International Year of  Volunteers aimed to stimulate national and international policy debate around,  and to advocate for, recognizing, facilitating, networking and promoting voluntary  action. The year led to a much better appreciation of the power of volunteerism  in its many forms and the ways to support it.

Symbols

The IVD  logo is used to promote the day. The logo features two olive branches that  encapsulate three Vs in a cup-like manner. Each V has bullet points at the top  of each tip of the letter, so the Vs are drawn in a way to resemble simple figures  of people in unity. The words “International Volunteer Day” are under the olive  branches. The image, including the words, is in orange on a white background.

External links

World Volunteer Web

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International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Fri Dec 5 1986 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sat Dec 5 1987 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Mon Dec 5 1988 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Tue Dec 5 1989 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Wed Dec 5 1990 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Thu Dec 5 1991 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sat Dec 5 1992 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sun Dec 5 1993 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Mon Dec 5 1994 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Tue Dec 5 1995 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Thu Dec 5 1996 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Fri Dec 5 1997 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sat Dec 5 1998 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sun Dec 5 1999 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Tue Dec 5 2000 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Wed Dec 5 2001 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Thu Dec 5 2002 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Fri Dec 5 2003 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sun Dec 5 2004 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Mon Dec 5 2005 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Tue Dec 5 2006 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Wed Dec 5 2007 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Fri Dec 5 2008 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sat Dec 5 2009 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sun Dec 5 2010 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Mon Dec 5 2011 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Wed Dec 5 2012 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Thu Dec 5 2013 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Fri Dec 5 2014 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day
Sat Dec 5 2015 International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development United Nation day

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INTERNATIONAL DAY OF DISABLED PERSONS: DECEMBER 3, 2010

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Persons with Disabilities is an occasion to re-affirm and draw attention to the rights of people who live with disabilities worldwide. It is held annually on December 3.

Local names

Name Language
International Day of Persons with Disabilities English
Día Internacional de las Personas con Discapacidad Spanish

International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2010

Friday, December 3, 2010

International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2011

Saturday, December 3, 2011
List of dates for other years.

Since 1992,  the United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Persons with Disabilities is  annually held on December 3. It aims to increase the understanding of the  issues around disabilities and attention to the dignity, rights and well-being  of persons with disabilities.

It also  aims to increase the awareness of the gains for everybody if disabled persons  are integrated into all aspects of political, social, economic and cultural  life and raising money for resources for persons with disabilities.


The International Day of Persons with Disabilities re-affirms and draws attention to the rights of people who live with disabilities. ©iStockphoto.com/Rich Legg

What do people do?

Many events  are held on and around the International Day of Persons with Disabilities on  December 3 each year. Many of these events aim to involve groups of people from  all sections of society in upholding the rights of persons with disabilities  and to celebrate the contributions by persons with disabilities to their  communities.

Other  events take the form of protests to highlight the difficulties disabled people  have in playing a full role in society. Examples of events include: forums with  experts and disabled persons; public discussions; the presentation of  information campaigns; exhibitions of art created by disabled people; social  gatherings; and fundraising activities to raise money to support disabled  people.

Public life

The  International Day of Persons with Disabilities is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

The United  Nations Decade of Disabled Persons was held from 1983 to 1992 to enable  governments and organizations to implement  measures to improve the life of disabled persons all over the world. On October  14, 1992, as this decade drew to a close, the UN General Assembly proclaimed  December 3 as the International Day of Disabled Persons. This day was first  observed on December 3, 1992. On December 18, 2007, the assembly changed the  observance’s name from the “International Day of Disabled Persons” to  the “International Day of Persons with Disabilities”. The new name  was first used in 2008.

Symbols

The  International Day of Persons with Disabilities is coordinated by United Nations  Enable, which works to support and promote the rights and dignity of persons  with disabilities. The symbol of Enable is the blue UN symbol and the word  “enable”. The UN symbol consists of an azimuthal equidistant  projection of the globe centered on the North Pole surrounded by olive  branches. The word “enable” is written entirely in lower case  letters. The letter “e” is red and the other letters are blue.

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International Day of Persons with Disabilities Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Dec 3 1992 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Fri Dec 3 1993 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Sat Dec 3 1994 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Sun Dec 3 1995 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Tue Dec 3 1996 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Wed Dec 3 1997 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Thu Dec 3 1998 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Fri Dec 3 1999 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Sun Dec 3 2000 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Mon Dec 3 2001 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Tue Dec 3 2002 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Wed Dec 3 2003 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Fri Dec 3 2004 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Sat Dec 3 2005 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Sun Dec 3 2006 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Mon Dec 3 2007 International Day of Disabled Persons United Nation day
Wed Dec 3 2008 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Thu Dec 3 2009 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Fri Dec 3 2010 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Sat Dec 3 2011 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Mon Dec 3 2012 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Tue Dec 3 2013 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Wed Dec 3 2014 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day
Thu Dec 3 2015 International Day of Persons with Disabilities United Nation day

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INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY: DECEMBER 2, 2010

INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day for the Abolition of Slavery is annually observed on December 2. The day encourages people to take a united stance to abolish all forms of slavery in modern society.

Local names

Name Language
International Day for the Abolition of Slavery English
Día Internacional de la Abolición de la Esclavitud Spanish

International Day for the Abolition of Slavery 2010

Thursday, December 2, 2010

International Day for the Abolition of Slavery 2011

Friday, December 2, 2011
List of dates for other years.

The United  Nations’ (UN) International Day for the Abolition of Slavery is annually observed  on December 2 to remind people that modern slavery works against human rights.

The  day also encourages people to put meaning to the words of the Universal  Declaration of Human Rights that “no one shall be held in slavery or servitude”  through their actions. This holiday is not to be confused with the UN’s International Day for the  Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.


The International Day for the Abolition of Slavery reminds people that modern slavery works against human rights. ©iStockphoto.com/milansys

What do people do?

Many people  use the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery as an opportunity to share  their perspective in writings through poetry, opinion pieces, interviews,  feature articles, short stories and other published material. Classrooms may  review the history of slave trade, its evolution and changes it has undergone  through to modern times. Students may also learn about the negative impacts of  slavery on society.

Online,  print and broadcast media promote the day through news, debates, forums, and  talks about modern day slave trade and why it is a serious human rights issue.  Political leaders, including senators and those with ministerial  responsibilities, also take the time to urge the public to work together in  eradicating any form of slavery in modern society. Flyers, posters, leaflets,  newsletters about abolishing slavery and slave trade are also distributed  throughout universities and in public areas on this day.

Public life

The  International Day for the Abolition of Slavery is an observance but not a public holiday.

Background

The United  Nations is committed to fighting against slavery and considers bonded labour,  forced labour, the worst forms of child labour and trafficking people as modern  forms of slavery. Some sources day that more than one million children are  trafficked each year for cheap labour or sexual exploitation. These types of slavery  are global problems and go against article four of the Universal Declaration of  Human Rights, which states that “no one shall be held in slavery or servitude;  slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms”.

The  International Day for the Abolition of Slavery recalls the adoption of the UN  Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the  Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others (resolution 317(IV) of December 2,  1949). To remember the convention, a UN report of the Working Group on Slavery  recommended in 1985 that December 2 be proclaimed the World Day for the  Abolition of Slavery in all its forms. By 1995, the day was known as the  International Day for the Abolition of Slavery.

On December  18, 2002, the UN General Assembly proclaimed 2004 the International Year to  Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition. On November 28, 2006,  the assembly designated March 25, 2007, as the International Day for the  Commemoration of the 200th Anniversary of the Abolition of the  Transatlantic Slave Trade. The UN also annually observes the UN’s International Day for the  Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition on August 23.

Symbols

The UN  emblem is often found in online and print material used to promote events such  as the United Nations’ International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. The  emblem consists of a projection of the globe centered on the North Pole. It  depicts all continents except Antarctica and four concentric circles  representing degrees of latitude. The projection is surrounded by images of  olive branches, representing peace. The emblem is often blue, although it is  printed in white on a blue background on the UN flag.

Note: It is unclear on when the name “International  Day for the Abolition of Slavery” was first used instead of the “World Day for  the Abolition of Slavery” but the new name was mentioned in a UN report in  1995.

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International Day for the Abolition of Slavery Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Mon Dec 2 1985 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Tue Dec 2 1986 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Wed Dec 2 1987 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Fri Dec 2 1988 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sat Dec 2 1989 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sun Dec 2 1990 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Mon Dec 2 1991 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Wed Dec 2 1992 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Thu Dec 2 1993 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Fri Dec 2 1994 World Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sat Dec 2 1995 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Mon Dec 2 1996 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Tue Dec 2 1997 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Wed Dec 2 1998 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Thu Dec 2 1999 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sat Dec 2 2000 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sun Dec 2 2001 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Mon Dec 2 2002 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Tue Dec 2 2003 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Thu Dec 2 2004 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Fri Dec 2 2005 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sat Dec 2 2006 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sun Dec 2 2007 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Tue Dec 2 2008 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Wed Dec 2 2009 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Thu Dec 2 2010 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Fri Dec 2 2011 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Sun Dec 2 2012 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Mon Dec 2 2013 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Tue Dec 2 2014 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day
Wed Dec 2 2015 International Day for the Abolition of Slavery United Nation day

SOURCE

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WORLD AIDS DAY: DECEMBER 1, 2010

WORLD AIDS DAY

Quick Facts

The United Nations’ (UN) World AIDS Day is an occasion to honor those who have died of AIDS and those who live with HIV or AIDS and to increase awareness of these conditions. It is held on December 1 each year.

Local names

Name Language
World AIDS Day English
Día Mundial del SIDA Spanish

World AIDS Day 2010

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

World AIDS Day 2011

Thursday, December 1, 2011
See list of observations below.

AIDS is a condition resulting from damage done to the human immune system by HIV. It affects tens of millions of people around the world. The United Nations’ (UN) World AIDS Day is held on December 1 each year to honor the victims of the AIDS pandemic and focus attention on the prevention and treatment of HIV and AIDS related conditions.


A simple red ribbon is one of the most widely recognized symbols of HIV and AIDS. ©iStockphoto.com/Jill Chen

What do people do?

World AIDS  Day is the focal point of the World AIDS Campaign, which is active all year  round. During the days and weeks leading up to World AIDS Day, there is often a  lot of coverage of the condition in the media and fundraising for AIDS and  HIV-related charities. In addition, health education campaigns aiming to reduce  the transmission of HIV and discrimination of people living with HIV and AIDS  are often launched on or around December 1.

On World  AIDS Day, many community, national and international leaders issue  proclamations on supporting and treating people living with HIV and AIDS and  stimulating research into the treatment of these conditions. Local communities  may hold events to remember and honor members who have died of AIDS-related  conditions or exhibitions around the subject. A particularly well-known example  is the AIDS Memorial Quilt. This project allows friends or family members of a  person who has died of AIDS to construct a quilt panel. The panels are then  exhibited all over the United States.

Public life

World AIDS  Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

AIDS stands  for “acquired immune deficiency syndrome” or “acquired  immunodeficiency syndrome” and denotes a condition, which results from the  damage done by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) to the immune system. The  condition was first identified in 1981 and the name “AIDS” was first  introduced on July 27, 1982.

HIV can  only be transmitted between people through direct contact of a mucous membrane  or the blood stream with a bodily fluid. Hence, there has been a lot of stigma  around the spread of HIV and people living with HIV and AIDS. It has been  estimated that around 33 million people around the world have been infected  with HIV and that around two million people die from AIDS related conditions  each year. On October  27, 1988, the UN General Assembly officially recognized that the World Health  Organization declared December 1, 1988, to be World AIDS Day. World AIDS Day  has also been observed on this date each year since then.

Symbols

A simple  red ribbon is one of the most widely recognized symbols of HIV and AIDS and the  people who live with these conditions. The symbol was presented by  the Visual AIDS Artists Caucus in 1991. The individuals in this group  wished to remain anonymous, keep the image copyright free and create a symbol  to raise consciousness of HIV and AIDS. The red ribbon was originally intended  to be worn as a badge, but is now used in a wide variety of ways.

The symbol  of UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS consists of the word  “UNAIDS”. The letters “U” and “N” are in black  and the rest of letters are in red. To the left of the word ‘UNAIDS’ is a red  ribbon superimposed on the symbol of the United Nations. This symbol is shown  in black and consists of an azimuthal equidistant projection of the globe  centered on the North Pole surrounded by olive branches.

The symbol  of the World AIDS Campaign consists of a sketched image of a red ribbon and the  words “world aids campaign”. The words “world” and  “campaign” are in black and the word “aids” is in red. The  ends of the ribbon merge into splashes of green, blue, purple and orange. The  splashes of color can be interpreted in a variety of ways, but are often taken  to indicate the diversity of people living with HIV and AIDS.

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World AIDS Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Dec 1 1988 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Fri Dec 1 1989 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sat Dec 1 1990 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sun Dec 1 1991 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Tue Dec 1 1992 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Wed Dec 1 1993 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Thu Dec 1 1994 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Fri Dec 1 1995 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sun Dec 1 1996 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Mon Dec 1 1997 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Tue Dec 1 1998 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Wed Dec 1 1999 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Fri Dec 1 2000 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sat Dec 1 2001 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sun Dec 1 2002 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Mon Dec 1 2003 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Wed Dec 1 2004 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Thu Dec 1 2005 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Fri Dec 1 2006 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sat Dec 1 2007 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Mon Dec 1 2008 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Tue Dec 1 2009 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Wed Dec 1 2010 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Thu Dec 1 2011 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sat Dec 1 2012 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Sun Dec 1 2013 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Mon Dec 1 2014 World AIDS Day United Nation day
Tue Dec 1 2015 World AIDS Day United Nation day

SOURCE

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