WORLD MENTAL HEALTH DAY: OCTOBER 10, 2010

 

WORLD MENTAL HEALTH DAY

Quick Facts

World Mental Health Day, which is supported by the United Nations (UN), is annually held on October 10 to raise public awareness about mental health issues worldwide.

Local names

Name Language
World Mental Health Day English
Día Mundial de la Salud Mental Spanish

World Mental Health Day 2010

Sunday, October 10, 2010

World Mental Health Day 2011

Monday, October 10, 2011
List of dates for other years

World Mental Health Day, which is supported by the United Nations (UN), is annually held on October 10 to raise public awareness about mental health issues worldwide. This event promotes open discussions on illnesses, as well as investments in prevention and treatment services.

Depression, including among young people, is a major mental health problem. World Mental Health Day promotes the awareness of such issues. ©iStockphoto.com/Christopher O Driscoll

What do people do?

World Mental Health Day is observed in more than 100 countries on October 10 through local, regional and national World Mental Health Day commemorative events and programs. Activities include:

  • Officials signing the World Mental Health Day proclamation.
  • Public service announcements.
  • Educational lectures and the distribution of research papers on mental health issues.
  • Awards to individuals or organizations who made significant contributions in improving mental health issues.

World Mental Health Day is an initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH). The World Health Organization (WHO), which is the UN’s directing and coordinating authority for health, supports this event. The Mental Health Foundation is another organization that is proactive in promoting World Mental Health Day.

Public life

World Mental Health Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

Mental disorders affect nearly 12 percent of the world’s population – about 450 million or one out of every four people around the world – will experience a mental illness that would benefit from diagnosis and treatment. WHO statistics for 2002 showed that 154 million people globally suffered from depression, which is a form of mental illness. According to WHO, mental health is defined as a state of well-being in which people realize their own potential, can cope with normal life stresses, can work productively, and can contribute to their community.

Mental health services lack human and financial resources in many countries, particularly low and middle income countries. More funding is needed to promote mental health to increase people’s awareness of the issue. In response to making mental health a global priority, World Health Day was first celebrated in 1992 as an initiative of the WFMH, which has members and contacts in more than 150 countries. Each year the UN, through WHO, actively participates in promoting this event.

Symbols

The WHO logo or emblem, which was chosen by the first World Health Assembly in 1948, is often associated with the UN’s promotional material for World Mental Health Day. The emblem consists of the UN symbol surmounted by a staff with a snake coiling round it. The staff with the snake has long been a symbol of medicine and the medical profession. It originates from the story of Aesculapius who was revered by the ancient Greeks as a god of healing and whose cult involved the use of snakes.

The UN logo is often associated with marketing and promotional material for this event. It features a projection of a world map (less Antarctica) centered on the North Pole, inscribed in a wreath consisting of crossed conventionalized branches of the olive tree. The olive branches symbolize peace and the world map depicts the area of concern to the UN in achieving its main purpose, peace and security. The projection of the map extends to 60 degrees south latitude, and includes five concentric circles.

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World Mental Health Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Sat Oct 10 1992 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 10 1993 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 10 1994 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 10 1995 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 10 1996 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 10 1997 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 10 1998 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 10 1999 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 10 2000 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 10 2001 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 10 2002 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 10 2003 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 10 2004 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 10 2005 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 10 2006 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 10 2007 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 10 2008 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 10 2009 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 10 2010 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 10 2011 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 10 2012 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 10 2013 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 10 2014 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 10 2015 World Mental Health Day United Nation day  

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WORLD POST DAY: OCTOBER 9, 2010

 

WORLD POST DAY

Quick Facts

World Post Day marks the anniversary of the Universal Postal Union’s establishment in 1874. It is held on October 9 each year.

Local names

Name Language
World Post Day English
Día Mundial del Correo Spanish

World Post Day 2010

Saturday, October 9, 2010

World Post Day 2011

Sunday, October 9, 2011
List of dates for other years are listed below.

World Post Day marks the anniversary of the Universal Postal Union’s establishment and is annually held on October 9. The union aimed to create and maintain a structure for the free flow of international mail around the world.
World Post Day
World Post Day marks the anniversary of the Universal Postal Union’s establishment. ©iStockphoto.com/Shawn Gearhart

What do people do?

In many international organizations and countries, high ranking officials or ministers make speeches or issue proclamations on the history or achievements of national or international postal services. Postal services may issue special postage stamps to commemorate the ideals, history or achievements of the national postal service on or around World Post Day. These are prized by stamp collectors and philatelists (people who study stamps). In addition, special lessons on these topics may be arranged for school children and the postal services and their employees may receive extra training or recognition and attention in the media.

The Universal Postal Union in cooperation with UNESCO has, for the past 35 years, organized an international letter-writing competition for young people. Many participating postal services use World Post Day to award prizes to the winners of the competition.

Public life

World Post Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

Background

From the earliest times in history, “postal services” existed in the form of messengers who travelled large distances on foot or horseback. In the 1600s and 1700s, many countries set up national postage systems and entered into bilateral agreements for the exchange of mail between countries. By the late 1800s there was a large web of bilateral agreements that made the distribution of international mail complicated, nontransparent and inefficient.

In 1863, Montgomery Blair, Postmaster General in the United States of America, organized a conference of representatives from 15 European and American countries. During this conference, the delegates laid down a number of general principles for mutual agreements on international postal services but did not create an international postal agreement. On September 15, 1874, Heinrich von Stephan, a senior postal official in the North German Confederation (an area that now forms parts of Germany, Poland and Russia), opened a conference in Berne, Switzerland, with delegates from 22 countries. On October 9, 1874, the delegates signed the Treaty of Berne and established the General Postal Union.

The number of countries that were members of the General Postal Union grew rapidly and the union’s name was changed to the Universal Postal Union in 1878. In 1948, the Universal Postal Union became a specialized agency of the United Nations. The 16th Universal Postal Union Congress was held in Tokyo, Japan, from October 1 to November 16, 1969. During this conference the delegates voted to declare October 9 each year as World Post Day.

The work of the Universal Postal Union continues to be very important to global communication and trade, even in the era of digital communication. In areas and communities with a high level of access to digital communication, postal services are important for distributing goods bought in Internet stores. In communities with lower levels of access to digital communication, postal services remain vital for the distribution of information and goods. Post offices and trucks used to deliver mail to outlying areas are also becoming service points to bring digital communication to many more people. Moreover, the union is working on ways to bring electronic money transfer services to rural areas in countries in the Middle East and in north-east Africa.

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World Post Day Observances

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
Thu Oct 9 1980 World Post Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 9 1981 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 9 1982 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 9 1983 World Post Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 9 1984 World Post Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 9 1985 World Post Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 9 1986 World Post Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 9 1987 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 9 1988 World Post Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 9 1989 World Post Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 9 1990 World Post Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 9 1991 World Post Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 9 1992 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 9 1993 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 9 1994 World Post Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 9 1995 World Post Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 9 1996 World Post Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 9 1997 World Post Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 9 1998 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 9 1999 World Post Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 9 2000 World Post Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 9 2001 World Post Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 9 2002 World Post Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 9 2003 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 9 2004 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 9 2005 World Post Day United Nation day  
Mon Oct 9 2006 World Post Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 9 2007 World Post Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 9 2008 World Post Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 9 2009 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sat Oct 9 2010 World Post Day United Nation day  
Sun Oct 9 2011 World Post Day United Nation day  
Tue Oct 9 2012 World Post Day United Nation day  
Wed Oct 9 2013 World Post Day United Nation day  
Thu Oct 9 2014 World Post Day United Nation day  
Fri Oct 9 2015 World Post Day United Nation day

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RECONSIDER COLUMBUS DAY 2010

Did you celebrate Columbus Day today?

If you did, did you know what it was you were celebrating?

 

 

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The United States  celebrates Christopher Columbus and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, both with federal holidays that bear their names: Dr. King, third Monday of January, on or around  January 15, and Columbus on the second Monday in October, on or around October 12.

Columbus who initiated and participated in the most massive genocide ever done against an entire continent with the decimation of millions of indigenous peoples, as well as set the foundation for the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade, left a legacy of murder, theft, and brutality that caused the population of Native Americans of this hemisphere to go from 50 million before 1492, to the present day population of a few million (2 million in America, 1 million in Canada).

Dr. King who fought to destroy the vestiges of de jure and de facto neo-slavery of Jane Crow segregation, left a legacy of love and humility towards his fellow human beings, as he fought against race hate, the viciousness of poverty and despair, the end of the Vietnam War, and to make this nation eradicate the destruction of bigotry that crippled not only Blacks, but also Whites and all other racial and ethnic groups.

Columbus:  a slaver, murderer, genocidist, and yes, a gold digger.

Dr. King: peaceful, faithful, non-violent, a true Christian who laid down his life for his fellow humans.

Yet, America persists in celebrating Columbus Day by honoring  a butcher.

I wonder why?

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ON THIS DAY IN BLACK MUSIC HISTORY: OCTOBER 11

#1 R&B Song 1986:  “Word Up,” Cameo

Born:  Thelonious Monk, 1917

File:Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947 (William P. Gottlieb 06191).jpg
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1952   Lloyd Price’s second single became a two-sided hit when “Oooh, Oooh, Oooh” reached #4 R&B and its flip, “Restless Heart,” reached #5.

1960   Aretha Franklin performed at a folk club, the Village Vanguard, in New York’s Greenwich Village, doing standards. She was still thirteen days away from her first R&B chart single, “Today I Sing the Blues.”

1969   Muddy Waters was critically injured in a car crash in Illinois but would recover to record and perform again.

1975   Stevie Wonder and Bob Marley & the Wailers performed at the National Arena in Kingston, Jamaica. A highlight was the band’s version of “I Shot the Sheriff” with Steve on keyboards.

1986   When Janet Jackson’s “When I Think of You” reached #1, she and her brother Michael became the first siblings to have solo #1s in the rock era. Michael’s first #1 was “Ben” in 1972.

1991   B.B. King performed on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show.

  

1994   John Lee Hooker performed for the benefit of Willie Dixon’s Blues Heaven Foundation at the House of Blues in Los Angeles.

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IN REMEMBRANCE: 10-10-2010

ALBERTINA WALKER, SOULFUL GOSPEL SINGER

By WILLIAM GRIMES

Published: October 8, 2010

Albertina Walker, a gospel singer with a lush contralto voice whose group, the Caravans, recorded a string of hits in the 1950s and 1960s and nourished the careers of such greats as the Rev. James Cleveland, Inez Andrews and Pastor Shirley Caesar, died on Friday in Chicago. She was 81.
October 9, 2010    

Doug Mills/Associated Press

Albertina Walker at the White House in 2002.

The cause was respiratory failure, her friend Pam Morris told The Associated Press.

Early on, Ms. Walker was a standout even in Chicago’s teeming, competitive gospel scene, and she became a protégé of Mahalia Jackson. With her good friend James Cleveland at the piano, she spent many evenings singing and socializing at Jackson’s house, listening to critical advice.

“I had seen Roberta Martin and Mahalia Jackson,” she told The Washington Post in 1998. “I wanted to stand up before audiences and deliver the message, win souls for Christ. I wanted to touch dying men and slipping women.”

After touring with the Willie Webb Singers, with whom she recorded her first single, “He’ll Be There,” she joined Robert Anderson and His Gospel Caravan. With the other three singers backing up Anderson — Elyse Yancey, Nellie Grace Daniels and Ora Lee Hopkins Samson Walker — she formed the Caravans in 1951.

“Anderson had an unusual, but pleasing, style of singing behind the beat, which Albertina picked up,” said Anthony Heilbut, the author of “The Gospel Sound: Good News and Hard Times” (1971). “You could think of her as his female counterpart.”

The Caravans’ first big hit, “Mary Don’t You Weep,” helped make them the most popular gospel group in the United States, with hits like “I Won’t Be Back,” (I Know) The Lord Will Provide,” “Show Me Some Sign,” “Sweeping Through the City,” “No Coward Soldier,” “Tell Him What You Want” and Ms. Walker’s great signature song, “Lord Keep Me Day by Day.”

They became known not only for hit songs but also for incubating future stars like Delores Washington, Cassietta George and Dorothy Norwood. Beginning in the 1970s Ms. Walker performed as a soloist with a variety of church choirs as her backup. Her first solo venture, “Put a Little Love in Your Heart,” released in 1975, was followed by more than 50 albums, including “I Can Go to God in Prayer” and “Joy Will Come.”

“Songs of the Church: Live in Memphis” won a Grammy Award in 1995 for the Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album, and in 2001 she was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame. President GeorgeW. Bush honored Ms. Walker for her contribution to gospel music in a White House ceremony in 2002.

Albertina Walker, known as Tina, was born on Aug. 29, 1929, on the South Side of Chicago, where she lived her entire life. She was the youngest of nine children. At the age of four she was singing with the youth choir of the West Point Baptist Church, under the direction of Pete Williams, and before long was performing with the Williams Singers. By 17, she was singing with Anderson.

Anderson, although blessed with a top-quality voice himself — he played king to Mahalia Jackson’s queen — made a practice of sharing the spotlight with his best singers, Ms. Walker chief among them. She followed his example as leader of the Caravans, stepping aside and letting her top performers shine.

In the early years, singers came and went. All the original members except Ms. Walker left the Caravans within a few years after it was founded. The early recordings, on the States label, featured tight harmonies and a sweet sound. Bil Carpenter, in “Uncloudy Days: The Gospel Music Encyclopedia,” notes that with the arrival of Bessie Griffin in 1953, the sound became much more dynamic — rhythmically precise with a sharp attack and earthy harmonies.

Although popular, the group struggled in the years before “Mary Don’t You Weep,” touring churches all over the United States but earning relatively little money. “We would put five to six dollars in the gas tank, drive all the way to New York or Mississippi,” Ms. Walker told N’Digo magazine in 2009. “We would pack into one car, nobody had a problem with it either. We would probably make $150 singing, but we would share our rewards and the money would pay a lot of bills back then.”

Ms. Walker can be heard in her prime on the album “The Best of the Caravans” (Savoy), and on the CD and DVD compilation “How Sweet It Was: The Sights and Sounds of Gospel’s Golden Age” (Shanachie), which includes the previously unreleased Caravans song “The Angels Keep Watching Over Me.”

With the arrival of a new crop of young singers — Ms. Andrews, Ms. Washington, Ms. Norwood and Ms. Caesar — that Ms. Walker allowed free rein, the Caravans embarked on a hot streak that continued until 1966, when Ms. Caesar and Ms. Anderson left the group. Ms. Walker kept the Caravans going for a time, bringing in the future disco star Loleatta Holloway, but in the 1970s struck out on her own.

Her later hits included “Please Be Patient With Me,” with Reverend Cleveland, and the poignant anthem “I’m Still Here.” “The Lord went all out with this song,” Ms. Walker told N’Digo. “I must say, I’m still here, and believe me when I say it, it’s been a wonderful life serving the Lord and His people through song.”

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JOHNNY EDGECOMBE, PROFUMO SCANDAL FIGURE

By DOUGLAS MARTIN

Published: October 9, 2010
Around lunchtime on Dec. 14, 1962, Johnny Edgecombe, a small-time hustler and jazz promoter angry at being jilted, fired six or seven shots at the London apartment where Christine Keeler, his former girlfriend and a sometime prostitute, was staying.

The shots led to his arrest and brief reports in the London newspapers, but no one could have anticipated their ultimate repercussions: a series of revelations that would help bring down a British government.

After the shooting, Ms. Keeler sought advice from some powerful friends, some of them her clients.

She was known to be talkative and boastful, and in the course of her conversations she spoke of her sexual escapades with a top minister in the British cabinet and a Soviet spy suspect, relating one episode of nude swimming on a royal estate. The stories began to leak out.

More details emerged in Mr. Edgecombe’s trial, and Ms. Keeler, who was 21, sold her story to the tabloid press, which ran pictures of her nearly nude. Questions were asked in the House of Commons. Government officials feared a security breach in the midst of the cold war. Journalists who had heard rumors of the sexual intrigue now produced front-page headlines. What was called the Scandal of the Century had seized much of the world’s imagination.

The biggest casualty was the government minister, John Profumo, the secretary of state for war. Mr. Profumo, the 48-year-old husband of a glamorous movie star, Valerie Hobson, was considered a possible future prime minister. Perhaps most intriguing was the case of the spy suspect, Cmdr. Eugene Ivanov, the assistant naval attaché at the Soviet Embassy in London; he vanished soon after the scandal broke.

Seven months after the shooting incident, Mr. Profumo resigned, admitting he had lied to Parliament about his relationship with Ms. Keeler. The Conservative Party government led by Harold Macmillan later fell. Espionage was never publicly proved.

Mr. Edgecombe, the unwitting catalyst, was acquitted of attempted-murder charges but was convicted of carrying a gun with intent to endanger life. He was sentenced to seven years in prison and served five.

The case brought him lasting notoriety, however; in 2002 he published a memoir, “Black Scandal.” He died on Sept. 26 in London at age 77. His daughter Melody Edgecombe-Jones said the cause was lung and renal cancer.

A big question during the scandal, only months after the Cuban missile crisis, was whether Ms. Keeler, in pillow talk, had passed information to the Russians concerning nuclear missiles.

But to a riveted public, Ms. Keeler’s own life — which included orgies with the rich and famous and liaisons with habitués of low-end nightclubs — was just as compelling.

Mr. Edgecombe, who had been living with Ms. Keeler, told of being quickly ushered out of the house when somebody like Mr. Profumo or Commander Ivanov visited. He said he once had to hide in a closet during one of Mr. Profumo’s visits. On the day of the shooting, he said, he had gone to her home in anguish because she had left him.

John Arthur Alexander Edgecombe was born on Oct. 22, 1932, in Antigua, where his father sailed a two-mast schooner around the Caribbean hauling gasoline, rice and other commodities. The father abandoned the family when his son was 10 and moved to the United States.

As a teenager, Mr. Edgecombe stowed away on a ship to try to find the father he idolized and ended up in a Texas youth jail. At 15, he arrived in Liverpool with all his worldly goods in a paper bag. He became a street hustler, dealing in marijuana and prostitutes.

He also briefly operated a club where drugs were sold illegally. Visiting another club with Ms. Keeler, he got into a knife fight with another West Indian immigrant and cut the man’s face. To protect her and Mr. Edgecombe from the man, Ms. Keeler bought a Luger pistol and gave it to Mr. Edgecombe to carry. It was this gun, Mr. Edgecombe said, that he took to Ms. Keeler’s apartment that October day.

On the day of the shooting he was high on drugs, he said. When a friend of Ms. Keeler’s would not let him in, he threw his body repeatedly at the door before shooting. He said in interviews that he shot at the lock five times and once more near a window. Other accounts say he fired seven shots. Mr. Edgecombe said he had never fired a gun before and had not intended to kill Ms. Keeler.

Ms. Keeler did not testify at the trial, having fled to Spain in March 1963.

Mr. Edgecombe is survived by two daughters from his first marriage, Yasmin Edgecombe and Camilla Filtenborg; a daughter from another relationship, Melody Edgecombe-Jones; and six grandchildren.

He went on to promote and play music, sell craftwork, occasionally live on the breadline and work as a movie extra.

Mr. Edgecombe did not think of himself as a bit player in the Profumo scandal, however.

“The British people wouldn’t hear of a situation where a government minister was sleeping with the same chick as a black boy,” he said in an interview with The Guardian in 1989. “If it had been a white guy, it would have blown over.”

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DICK GRIFFEY, FOUNDER OF SOLAR RECORDS

By DENNIS HEVESI

Published: October 4, 2010
Dick Griffey, the founder of the Solar record label — known for bringing a funky, laid back, California sound to soul, R&B and disco in the ’70s and ’80s — died on Sept. 24 in Los Angeles. He was 71.

The cause was complications of quadruple bypass surgery, his daughter Regina Griffey Hughes said.

Solar was an acronym for Sound of Los Angeles Records. It was started by Mr. Griffey in 1977 as a spinoff from Soul Train Records, a company he had founded several years earlier with Don Cornelius, the creator and host of the long-running, dance-driven television variety show “Soul Train.” Mr. Griffey had been the show’s talent coordinator.

Under his aegis, Solar signed groups like Shalamar, the Whispers, Lakeside, Dynasty, Klymaxx, Midnight Star and the Deele. And by 1980, The Los Angeles Times called Mr. Griffey “the most promising new black music executive” in the country.

Shalamar, which included several performers from the “Soul Train” show, went on to score more than a dozen hit singles, among them “The Second Time Around,” which topped the soul music charts and crossed over into the pop market. Other Shalamar hits were “Right in the Socket,” “Make That Move,” “A Night to Remember” and “This Is For the Lover In You.”Also among Solar’s biggest stars were the Whispers, who brought their intricate harmonies to hits like “It’s a Love Thing,” “Chocolate Girl,” “Rock Steady” and — their best known — “And the Beat Goes On,” which Mr. Griffey helped write. Other Solar hits include Lakeside’s “Fantastic Voyage,” Babyface’s “It’s No Crime” and Klymaxx’s “The Men All Pause.”

Mr. Griffey’s “fingerprints were on some of the biggest hits of the ’80s,” the composer and record producer Quincy Jones said in a written statement.

Richard Gilbert Griffey was born on Nov. 16, 1938, in Nashville, Tenn., one of two children of Joseph and Juanita Gilbert Griffey. Besides his daughter Regina, Mr. Griffey is survived by his wife, Carrie Lucas, a singer whom he married in 1974; another daughter, Carolyn Griffey; two sons, Lucas and Che; five grandchildren, and Haile Williams, whom he took in as a teenager and raised as his son. His first marriage ended in divorce.

Mr. Griffey, who grew up in the projects of Nashville, had been a drummer in a band that played in local clubs. At 17, he enlisted in the Navy and became a medical corpsman. After his discharge, he worked as a private-duty nurse.

In the early 1960s he moved to Los Angeles, and within a few years was part-owner of a nightclub, Guys and Dolls, that grew in popularity and eventually attracted performers like Ike and Tina Turner, and Isaac Hayes.

With his booking ability, Mr. Griffey became a concert promoter for stars like Michael Jackson, Aretha Franklin, James Brown, Stevie Wonder and many others. “Professionally, I could not talk about my life without there being a chapter on how Dick Griffey, as a promoter, helped to build my career,” Mr. Wonder said in a statement.

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ON THIS DAY IN BLACK MUSIC HISTORY: OCTOBER 10

#1 R&B Song 1953:  “Shake a Hand,” Faye Adams

Born:  Ivory Joe Hunter, 1914; Cyril Neville (the Neville Brothers), 1948; Mya (Mya Harrison), 1979

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1914   Rhythm & blues pioneer Ivory Joe Hunter was born today. He started his career doing gospel music and ended it as a country performer, but his success was in R&B, where he had twenty-one chart hits between 1945 and 1958, including “I Almost Lost My Mind” and the classic “Since I Met You Baby,” two of his four #1s.

1958   The Dells opened a weeklong engagement headlining at New York’s Apollo Theater.

1962   Little Richard and Sam Cooke performed at the Granada Theater in Mansfield during their tour of England.

1972   The O’Jays’ “Backstabbers” reached its top peak in America at #3 while becoming their first (#14) of nine hits in England.

1992   HBO was reported to have paid 420 million for the rights to air Michael Jackson’s recent performance in Bucharest, Romania. The show was called From Bucharest: The Dangerous Tour.

  

1991   Thanks to their 1977 hit “Brick House,” the Commodores were inducted into the National Association of Brick Distributors Hall of Fame in New York.

1992   Shabba Ranks charted with “Slow and Sexy,” reaching #10 R&B. Obviously unconcerned about alienating a portion of his fan base, he would later be quoted in a British publication saying that “gays deserve crucifixion.”

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ON THIS DAY IN BLACK MUSIC HISTORY: OCTOBER 9

#1 Song 1961: “Hit the Road Jack,” Ray Charles

Born: Overton Vertis “O.V.” Wright, 1939

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1952 The Five Keys recorded one of their most beautiful ballads, “Someday Sweetheart” ($800), but their label, Aladdin Records showed little interest, waiting a year and a half before releasing i in March 1954.

1954 The Drifters’ “Someday You’ll Want Me To Want You” (Atlantic $40) was issued, as was the Orioles’ “If You Believe” (Jubilee $50).

1954 Shirley Gunter & the Queens, a Los Angeles female quartet, hit the R&B singles survey with “Oop Shoop” (#8). They were the first Black American girl group. By the time “Oop Shoop” was released, Shirley (sister of Coasters member Cornel Gunter) was legally blind.

1964 The Supremes made their first visit to England and performed on the British TV show Ready, Steady, Go!

1976 Warm-voiced West Indian vocalist Joan Armatrading hit the album Top 200 for the first time with her self-titled LP, eventually reaching #67. She would go on to have eleven more albums chart in America through 1990. Her self-titled album yielded some very beautiful hits:

1982 Diana Ross charted with “Muscles,” reaching #4 R&B and #10 pop. The song was written and produced by Michael Jackson, and it’s no coincidence that “Muscles” was the name of Michael’s pet snake.

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