HATEWATCH: NEO-NAZI CREATIVITY MOVEMENT IS BACK

SPLC Intelligence Report, Winter   2010
Neo-Nazi Creativity Movement Is Back
    By Larry Keller

    One day last May, Travis McAdam, executive director of the Montana Human Rights Network, was getting ready to make a presentation on the white supremacist Creativity Movement in a Montana museum when a belligerent young man accosted him. “Do you know who I am?” the man demanded. McAdam most certainly did. Facing him was Allen Goff, a rising figure in the neo-Nazi group who two days earlier had been acquitted of a felony charge of wounding a Latino teen in a shooting that prosecutors contended was racially motivated.

    Goff, only 18, was asked by McAdam to leave the museum and complied. But the incident in Billings was significant, McAdam says, suggesting that Goff and the once-moribund group behind him “feel more emboldened now.”

    The fact that Goff or anybody else is active at all in The Creativity Movement is surprising in and of itself. The Creativity Movement has survived name changes, the death of its founder and the imprisonment of his successor. It has lived through subsequent schisms, competing claims of leadership, and, frequently, no apparent leadership at all. Most of its all-important “holy books” have been destroyed, turned into an anti-racist art project by McAdam and others — the same exhibit that McAdam was working on when confronted by Goff this spring.

    Allen Goff of the Creativity Movement
    Montanan Neo-Nazi Allen Goff, an aficionado of the “holy books” of Creativity, convinced a jury last spring that he’d shot a Latino youth by accident.

    But each time the neo-Nazi organization has appeared to be on the verge of death, it has rallied. Today, while its health is hardly robust and there is a far larger competing neo-Nazi group (the Detroit-based National Socialist Movement), there are signs that the Creativity Movement is growing again. From 11 chapters in 2008, the group had grown to 14 by the end of 2009. Of those, eight are based in McAdam’s home state of Montana, which has seen a rash of leafleting and other activity this year from Goff and his friends in The Creativity Movement.

    It’s almost impossible to say just how many people belong to The Creativity Movement, which is now headed by James Logsdon of Zion, Ill. McAdam estimates there are no more than 40 to 50 members in his state. But he says that Americans should be concerned. “There is a new generation of Creators in Montana,” he says — younger than their predecessors, increasing in numbers, and working to ally themselves with other racist groups. Most importantly of all, McAdam warns, is “you have this history of [Creativity] activists becoming violent.”


    Ben Klassen, founder of the Church of the Creator

    ‘Racial Holy War’
    Ben Klassen, a one-time Florida state legislator and inventor of the electric can opener, founded the Church of the Creator (COTC), the Creativity Movement’s predecessor, in 1973. From the start, it was imbued with a Nazi-like credo: Whites are a superior race, responsible for virtually all creative enterprises in human history, and non-whites (“mud races”) and especially Jews intend to subjugate whites. These views were elucidated by Klassen in some 13 tedious books, among them such racist classics as The White Man’s Bible and Building a Whiter & Brighter World.

    “Now the White Race has a racial religion of its own and we call it CREATIVITY,” Klassen wrote at one point.

    But it was a “religion” with no deity and very little philosophy outside an earnest belief in unprocessed foods. The Creator is not an unseen higher being — he or she is simply a white who subscribes to “Creativity.” Creators don’t believe in “spirits, gods and demons.” They do believe “that our race is our religion.”

    Over the years, many of Klassen’s followers responded to his insistent call for a “racial holy war” — “RaHoWa!” remains the organization’s primary war cry — and were sent to prison for violent, racially motivated crimes. In 1991, a Creator named George Loeb murdered a black Gulf War veteran, Harold Mansfield, in Florida and went to prison for life.

    Klassen was fearful that the Mansfield murder would land his group in court with the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), which had successfully sued a number of hate groups for the violent actions of their members. Aging, he also was interested in turning over the COTC to younger leadership.  To protect the COTC’s assets from a possible SPLC case, Klassen sold the COTC headquarters for a price far below its fair market value to fellow racist William Pierce, the head of the neo-Nazi National Alliance. After giving Rudy “Butch” Stanko (then serving time for intentionally selling tainted meat to public schools) a trial run as the leader of the COTC, Klassen turned over the reins of the group to Rick McCarty, a con man from Florida. Believing his life’s work was safe in McCarty’s hands and depressed over the recent death of his wife, Klassen committed suicide in 1993.

    As Klassen had predicted, the SPLC eventually filed suit against the COTC over the Mansfield killing. McCarty, more interested in using the COTC to make money than to promote Klassen’s beliefs, chose not to defend the case, and the SPLC obtained a $1 million default judgment. The SPLC then brought an action against Pierce, claiming that he knew that Klassen had sold the COTC headquarters to him for a fraction of its value to keep it safe from a possible claim from the Mansfield family. A jury agreed, awarding Mansfield’s family $80,000, the amount by which Pierce had profited from the fraudulent, bargain-basement sale from Klassen. McCarty, in the meantime, allowed the COTC to wither.

    Around the same time, in 1993, eight individuals with ties to the COTC were arrested in Southern California for plotting to bomb a black church in L.A. and assassinate Rodney King, whose videotaped beating by white police officers in 1991 had sparked national outrage. Later that year, Jeremiah Knesal, a member of the COTC, was found with weapons, ammunition and hate literature in his car; he later confessed to his involvement in a July 1993 firebombing of an NAACP office in Tacoma, Wash.

    Matt Hale
    Matt Hale

    In 1995, Matt Hale arrived on the scene. Smart, energetic, and media friendly, he resuscitated the COTC and, in a sign of his ambitions, changed its name to the World Church of the Creator (WCOTC). Composed largely of racist skinheads, the Hale-led “church” grew from 14 chapters in 1996 to 88 in 2002, making it, for a time, the neo-Nazi group with the largest number of chapters in America.

    Meanwhile, its members continued to engage in criminal attacks on minorities in Florida and elsewhere, including, most infamously, a racist murder spree carried out in Illinois and Indiana in 1999 by Benjamin Nathaniel Smith. Smith, enraged that Hale had been denied a law license because of his political views even though he’d passed the bar exam, murdered an African American and a Korean American and wounded nine other people before killing himself. Hale denied even knowing Smith immediately after the killings. But he was lying — it turned out that he had named Smith “Creator of the Year” just months before.

    But the worst blow of all came when Hale was arrested in January 2003 and charged with soliciting the murder of a federal judge who had ruled against him and his group in a trademark infringement complaint. (A Pacific Northwest church with anti-racist views had copyrighted the World Church of the Creator name years before and was demanding that Hale’s group stop using it.) The following year, Hale was convicted of four felonies and sentenced to 40 years in prison.

    That seemed to fatally cripple the group, which had no obvious successor to Hale. Those who remained associated with it were forced by the outcome of the federal case to begin using a different name, and they selected The Creativity Movement. But the group was extremely weak, with various individuals vying for Hale’s scepter unsuccessfully.

    Eventually, in 2007, one group of former WCOTC members formed an alternative organization called the Creativity Alliance. The Creativity Alliance viewed Klassen as its founder, to be sure, but eschewed the goal of a future race war and also decided that “it is in the best interests of Creativity for us to adopt a policy of non-participation in the ‘White Power’ social scene.” Still, the Creativity Alliance, which remains active today with eight chapters in seven states, does not seem far removed from its origins. One article on its website rants about “niggers” and “the hideous Jews” and ends with “White man fight!”

    The Creativity Alliance’s declaration of non-participation in the movement — whatever that may really suggest — does not mean that more active Creators have gone away. On the contrary, they are showing definite signs of life.

    Making a Comeback
    Travis McAdam has a theory of how The Creativity Movement keeps reviving against all odds — Ben Klassen’s books. “The fact that these foundational texts continue to circulate and provide an ideological rudder … helps to keep the message alive,” he says. “Ben Klassen was not a gifted writer, but [he] was a prolific one.”

    That’s why McAdam’s Montana Human Rights Network jumped at the chance when, in 2003, an ex-Creator offered the group 4,100 of Klassen’s hard-copy books for a mere $300. The network purchased the books and provided them to police departments, scholars and other non-racists with an interest. Teaming up with a Helena art museum, it also gave thousands of copies of the books to artists for an anti-racist exhibit. The books were pulped, cut up and made into other objects and shown around the state. It had to be a low moment for Creators, who saw their version of Holy Scripture being ridiculed publicly.

    The loss of the physical books, which can still be downloaded and printed out at The Creativity Movement’s website, has not wrecked the group, however. In fact, in recent months Creators have distributed literature in several cities and staged rallies in Kalispell and Bozeman, where they carried signs and flags.

    Another sign of a limited Creativity resurgence is criminal violence.

    Allen Goff with guns
    Allen Goff

    In August 2009, Allen Goff, who was 17 at the time, was charged as an adult after shooting another teenager in the leg. (Only three months earlier, he had been named “Creator of the Year” by The Creativity Movement.) Despite his youthfulness, Goff was at that point already a four-year veteran of the white supremacist movement. The Latino teen he shot told police that he and Goff used to be friends but parted ways over Goff’s racist ideology.

    In the end, Goff, who claimed the shooting was accidental, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of carrying a concealed weapon — brass knuckles. But he went to trial on a charge of felony assault; a jury acquitted him of that charge after a judge ruled that prosecutors could not introduce evidence of his racist activities, including pictures of Goff with guns, a swastika and racist literature. He was sentenced to six months of probation and a fine of $150.

    In Montana, the current epicenter of the Creativity movement, Goff and his mainly young compatriots now seem to be enjoying some real success in the trial’s aftermath. “He has, and some of the people he has recruited have, an edge in that they can recruit on a peer level,” McAdam says. Since Goff’s acquittal, he adds, “there has been a lot more chatter online. We’ve always felt he’s one of the ringleaders.”

    The resurgence of The Creativity Movement and other white supremacist activity in Montana — where another racist group, Pioneer Little Europe, showed a pro-Nazi film at the Kalispell library in April — shows no signs of abating, McAdam says. And that may only be a sign of bigger things.

    “I think what’s going on in Montana … is a microcosm of what is happening nationally,” McAdam says. “We just have a close-to-the-ground view.”

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    INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY: DECEMBER 11, 2010

     

    INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY

    Quick Facts

    The United Nations’ (UN) International Mountain Day is an occasion to help raise awareness of the people who live in mountainous regions and the role that these regions play in providing food, water, and recreation. It is observed on December 11 each year.

    Local names

    Name Language
    International Mountain Day English
    Día Internacional de las Montañas Spanish

    International Mountain Day 2010

    Saturday, December 11, 2010

    International Mountain Day 2011

    Sunday, December 11, 2011
    List of dates for other years.

    The year 2002 was the International Year of Mountains. As this year drew to a close, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly proclaimed December 11 to be International Mountain Day. This observance, which is celebrated annually, aims to draw attention to the important roles that mountainous regions play in water and food supply.

    International Mountain Day commemorates the role in which mountains play in providing food, water, and recreation. ©iStockphoto.com/Joseph Jean

    What do people do?

    Various  activities are organized on and around International Mountain Day. These aim to  increase awareness of and knowledge around the role of mountains and  mountainous regions amongst the general population and professionals.  Particular examples of events are: book fairs; symposia; themed lectures for  students; workshops and press events. Mountaineering and explorations societies  may hold lectures and social events on or around December 11.

    Public life

    International  Mountain Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

    Background

    The  International Year of Mountains was held in 2002 and with the aim of raising  awareness and triggering action on issues relating to sustainable mountain  development. The leading agency was the Food and Agriculture Organization. The  International Year of Mountains was launched at the headquarters of the United  Nations in New York on December 11, 2001.

    On December  20, 2002, as the International Year of Mountains drew to a close, the UN  designated December 11 as International Mountain Day and encouraged the  international community to organize events to highlight the importance of  sustainable mountain development on this date. International Mountain Day was  first observed on December 11, 2003. Each year  International Mountain Day has a particular theme. Previous themes have focused on freshwater, peace, biodiversity or climate change.

    Symbols

    The symbol  of International Mountain Day consists of three equilateral triangles, each orientated  with two points on a single imaginary horizontal line and one point directed  upwards. The triangles are mainly black and represent mountains. The triangle  on the left has a blue “diamond” shape at the top, representing ice  or snow at the top of a mountain. The middle triangle has an orange circle at  its center, representing resources that are mined from inside mountains. The  triangle on the right has a small green triangle at its lower right-hand point.

    This  represents the crops that grow on mountains. Under the three triangles is a  black stripe containing the words “11 December” and the words  “International Mountain Day” in two shades of United Nations’ use of the  color blue. The symbol of International Mountain Day is based on the symbol for  the International Year of Mountains (2002).

     

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    International Mountain Day Observances

    Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
    Thu Dec 11 2003 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 11 2004 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 11 2005 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 11 2006 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 11 2007 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 11 2008 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 11 2009 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 11 2010 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 11 2011 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 11 2012 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 11 2013 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 11 2014 International Mountain Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 11 2015 International Mountain Day United Nation day

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    HUMAN RIGHTS DAY: DECEMBER 10, 2010

     

    HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

    Quick Facts

    Human Rights Day is an occasion for people worldwide to know and consider the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    Local names

    Name Language
    Human Rights Day English
    Día de los Derechos Humanos Spanish

    Human Rights Day 2010

    Friday, December 10, 2010

    Human Rights Day 2011

    Saturday, December 10, 2011
    See list of observations below.

    The United Nations’ (UN) Human Rights  Day is annually observed December 10 to mark the anniversary of the presentation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


    Human Rights Day is a time for people to reflect about the meaning, importance, and need for human rights.  This illustration is based on artwork from ©iStockphoto.com/Amanda Rohde

    What do people do?

    Events  focused on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights are held worldwide on and  around December 10. Many events aim to educate people, especially children and  teenagers, on their human rights and the importance of upholding these in their  own communities and further afield.

    The day may  also include protests to alert people of circumstances in parts of the world  where the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is not recognized or respected,  or where the importance of these rights are not considered to be important.  Cultural events are also organized to celebrate the importance of human rights  through music, dance, drama or fine art.

    Public life

    Human  Rights Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

    Background

    The  Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted between January 1947 and  December 1948. It aimed to form a basis for human rights all over the world and  represented a significant change of direction from events during World War II  and the continuing colonialism that was rife in the world at the time. The  Universal Declaration of Human Rights is considered as the most translated  document in modern history. It is available in more than 360 languages and new  translations are still being added.

    The UN  General Assembly adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human  Rights at the Palais de Chaillot in Paris, France, on the December 10, 1948.  All states and interested organizations were invited to mark December 10 as  Human Rights Day at a UN meeting on December 4, 1950. It was first observed on  December 10 that year and has been observed each year on the same date. Each year  Human Rights Day has a theme. Some of these themes have focused on people knowing their human rights or the importance of human rights education.

    Symbols

    The UN  symbol (an azimuthal equidistant projection of the globe centered on the North  Pole surrounded by olive branches) is often associated with Human Rights Day.  Copies of the whole Universal Declaration of Human Rights are also regarded as  symbolic of Human Rights Day and are often distributed on or around December  10.

     

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    Human Rights Day Observances

    Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
    Wed Dec 10 1980 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 10 1981 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 10 1982 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 10 1983 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 10 1984 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 10 1985 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 10 1986 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 10 1987 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 10 1988 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 10 1989 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 10 1990 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 10 1991 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 10 1992 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 10 1993 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 10 1994 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 10 1995 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 10 1996 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 10 1997 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 10 1998 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 10 1999 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 10 2000 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 10 2001 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 10 2002 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 10 2003 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 10 2004 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 10 2005 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 10 2006 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 10 2007 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 10 2008 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 10 2009 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 10 2010 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 10 2011 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 10 2012 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 10 2013 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 10 2014 Human Rights Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 10 2015 Human Rights Day United Nation day

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    INTERNATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION DAY: DECEMBER 9, 2010

     

    INTERNATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION DAY

    Quick Facts

    The United Nations’ (UN) International Anti-Corruption Day is annually observed on December 9 to raise public awareness of corruption and ways to fight it.

    Local names

    Name Language
    International Anti-Corruption Day English
    Día Internacional contra la Corrupción Spanish

    International Anti-Corruption Day 2010

    Thursday, December 9, 2010

    International Anti-Corruption Day 2011

    Friday, December 9, 2011
    See list of observations below.

    The United Nations’ (UN) International Anti-Corruption Day aims to raise public awareness of corruption and what people can do to fight it. It is observed on December 9 each year.

    Musicals, plays, keynote speeches and other activities that focus on the theme of fighting against corruption help promote International Anti-Corruption Day. ©iStockphoto.com/Nikada

    What do people do?

    International  Anti-Corruption Day is a time for political leaders, governments, legal bodies  and lobby groups to work together against corruption work by promoting the day  and the issues that surround this event. On this day anti-corruption advocates  organize events to engage the general public to effectively fight against  corruption and fraud in communities. Other  activities that promote the day include:

    • Musicals  and plays to publicize the message of fighting against corruption.
    • Keynote  speeches by those who were victims of corruption or fought against it.
    • Essay  competitions on issues surrounding the topic of corruption.
    • The  dissemination of posters, flyers and other material to increase awareness  levels on corruption.

    Some  organizations hold special recognition ceremonies to pay tribute to people and  projects that provide assistance to nations and communities in the battle  against corruption.

    Public life

    International  Anti-Corruption Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

    Background

    Corruption  is an issue that affects all countries around the world. It can refer to the  destruction of one’s honesty or loyalty through undermining moral integrity or  acting in a way that shows a lack of integrity or honesty. It also refers to those  who use a position of power or trust for dishonest gain. Corruption undermines democracy,  creates unstable governments, and sets countries back economically. Corruption  comes in various forms such as bribery, law-breaking without dealing with the  consequences in a fair manner, unfairly amending election processes and  results, and covering mistakes or silencing whistleblowers (those who expose  corruption in hope that justice would be served).

    By  resolution 58/4 of October 31, 2003, the UN General Assembly designated December  9 as International Anti-Corruption Day. This decision aimed to raise people’s awareness  of corruption and of the role of the United Nations Convention against  Corruption in combating and preventing it. The assembly urged all states and  competent regional economic integration organizations to sign and ratify the  United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) to ensure its rapid entry  into force. UNCAC is the first legally binding, international anti-corruption  instrument that provides a chance to mount a global response to corruption.

    Symbols

    Posters,  slogans, and other promotional material on International Anti-Corruption Day  have featured a slogan or logo that takes up two lines. The first line reads “CORRUPTION”  in capitalized red words, and underneath are the words “Your NO counts”. Most of the  second line is written in black text except for the word “NO” which is  highlighted in red capital letters within a white speech bubble.

    The UN logo  is also associated with promotions for this event. It features a projection of  a world map (less Antarctica) centered on the North Pole, inscribed in a wreath  consisting of crossed conventionalized branches of the olive tree. The olive  branches symbolize peace and the world map depicts the area of concern to the  UN in achieving its main purpose, peace and security. The projection of the map  extends to 60 degrees south latitude, and includes five concentric circles.

     

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    International Anti-Corruption Day Observances

    Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
    Tue Dec 9 2003 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 9 2004 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 9 2005 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 9 2006 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 9 2007 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 9 2008 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 9 2009 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 9 2010 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 9 2011 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 9 2012 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 9 2013 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 9 2014 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 9 2015 International Anti-Corruption Day United Nation day

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    INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION DAY: DECEMBER 7, 2010

     

    INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION DAY

    Quick Facts

    International Civil Aviation Day is observed globally on December 7 each year. It is observed by organizations such as the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

    Local names

    Name Language
    International Civil Aviation Day English
    Día de la Aviación Civil Internacional Spanish

    International Civil Aviation Day 2010

    Tuesday, December 7, 2010

    International Civil Aviation Day 2011

    Wednesday, December 7, 2011
    See list of observations below.

    International Civil Aviation Day is annually observed December 7 to raise awareness of the importance of international civil aviation and the role that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) plays in international air transport.  The organization is a United Nations (UN) body responsible for developing international standards for aviation safety.

    International Civil Aviation Day reminds people about the importance of international civil aviation in modern society. ©iStockphoto.com/Alexander Hafemann

    What do people do?

    ICAO, with  support from governments, organizations, businesses and individuals, actively  promotes International Civil Aviation Day through various activities and  events.  This day is celebrated globally,  especially in countries such as South Africa, through various activities such  as seminars, published material, educational lectures, classroom activities, and  news announcements on international civil aviation topics related to the day.

    Public life

    International  Civil Aviation Day is a global observance and not a public holiday.

    Background

    ICAO was  established on December 7, 1944, to secure international cooperation and  uniformity in civil aviation matters. The International Services Transit  Agreement and the International Air Transport Agreement were also signed. In  1994 ICAO established International Civil Aviation Day by to mark the organization’s  50th anniversary.

    This  observance aims to generate and reinforce global awareness of the importance of  international civil aviation in the social and economic development . The day  also commemorates the ICAO’s role in promoting the safety, efficiency and  regularity of international air transport.

    In 1996 the  UN General Assembly proclaimed December 7 as International Civil Aviation Day, in  accordance with an ICAO initiative and with the Canadian Government’s  assistance. The assembly urged governments and organizations to observe the  day. This day is now an official UN day.

    ICAO is a  UN body that works closely with other United Nations members including the World  Meteorological Organization, the International Telecommunication Union, the  Universal Postal Union, the World Health Organization and the International  Maritime Organization.

    Symbols

    The ICAO  logo is often associated with marketing and promotional material for this event.  It is similar to the UN logo in that the ICAO logo has a pair of aircraft wings  superimposed on the UN logo. The UN logo features a projection of a world map  (less Antarctica) centered on the North Pole, inscribed in a wreath consisting  of crossed conventionalized branches of the olive tree. The olive branches  symbolize peace and the world map depicts the area of concern to the UN in  achieving its main purpose, peace and security. The projection of the map extends  to 60 degrees south latitude, and includes five concentric circles.

    Over the  years the ICAO logo has been published in different variations. In 1995 ICAO  recognized the introduction of Arabic and Chinese as the organization’s working  languages and this was reflected on the logo – both languages are found in the  logo to describe ICAO.

    Note: Although International Civil Aviation Day  became an official UN day in 1996, many people celebrated the day since 1994.

     

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    International Civil Aviation Day Observances

    Weekday Date Year Name Holiday type Where it is observed
    Wed Dec 7 1994 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 7 1995 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 7 1996 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 7 1997 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 7 1998 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 7 1999 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 7 2000 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 7 2001 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 7 2002 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 7 2003 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 7 2004 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 7 2005 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Thu Dec 7 2006 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 7 2007 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 7 2008 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 7 2009 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Tue Dec 7 2010 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Wed Dec 7 2011 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Fri Dec 7 2012 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sat Dec 7 2013 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Sun Dec 7 2014 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day
    Mon Dec 7 2015 International Civil Aviation Day United Nation day

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    SKYWATCH: EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE ANALYZED, AN ABUNDANCE OF DWARF STARS, AND MORE

    News

    GJ 1214 and transiting planet
    ESO /
    Luis Calçada

    Bulletin at a Glance

    News
    Observing
    This Week’s Sky at a
    Glance
    Community

    A Steamy
    Super-Earth?

    December 1, 2010 | For the first time, astronomers
    have detected the atmosphere of an exoplanet that is not a gas giant. > read more

    Starry,
    Starry, Starry Night

    December 2, 2010 | Two astronomers report
    that small, dim red-dwarf stars are far more abundant in elliptical galaxies than thought —
    so much so that the total number of stars in the universe is likely three times higher than
    previous estimates. > read more

    Observing

    S&T:
    Lauren Darby

    Tour
    December’s Sky by Eye and Ear!

    November 30, 2010 | One of
    the grand tales of celestial mythology is playing out overhead during December
    evenings. Host: S&T’s Kelly Beatty. (6.5MB MP3 download: running time: 7m
    00s) > read more

    Revival on
    Jupiter Continues

    December 3, 2010 | The King of Planets was
    missing one of its signature dark belts last February, but it’s gradually
    returning to view. > read more

    Encounters
    with Comet Hartley 2

    October 28, 2010 | Comet Hartley 2 comes
    back into moonless view around the morning of November 1st — in time for the
    spacecraft encounter on November 4th! > read more

    This Week’s Sky at a Glance

    Jupiter on Dec. 1, 2010

    This Week’s Sky at a Glance

    December 3, 2010
    | Jupiter’s South Equatorial Belt Outbreak has spread its dark stuff halfway
    around the planet. Venus blazes high in the dawn, with Saturn looking on. And
    deep in the sunset, the Moon occults Mars. > read more

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    COLORLINES: DREAM VOTE LOOMS AS PRESSURE BUILDS

    December 2, 2010 ColorLines Direct | Published by the Applied Research
    Center

    Senate
    Negotiations Narrow DREAM Act’s Scope as Vote Nears

    Legislators are jockeying and the White House is weighing in big as both chambers ready a
    lame-duck vote. Julianne Hing is following the action.
    For up to the moment news on the DREAM Act visit colorlines.com/dream

    A
    Conversation with Harry Belafonte on Race and Politics Today

    The music legend and human rights icon sits down with ColorLines publisher
    Rinku Sen.
    Also: Harry
    Belafonte’s Love for Racial Justice—and Radical
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